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Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

Freshman 




VR BASIL B. 
LIBRARY 



WOOD 



Mmiui 




Vol. XLVII 



AMIIKKST, MASSACHUSETTS, Till RSDAY, SEPTEMBBB 21, 1936 



No. 1 



New Members of Staff 
Announced by President 



N T ine Additions and 
Promotions on List 



President Hugh P. Baker recently 
announced changes and additions 
made in the teaching and research 
personnel of Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. Four additional instructors were 
appointed to the faculty of the College, 
two new members were appointed to 
the staff of the experiment station, 
and three of the present faculty mem- 
bers were awarded promotions. 

Those appointed as instructors are: 
Leonta G. Horrigan of Springfield, 
instructor in English; Wilho Frigard 
<>f Maynard, instructor in physical 
education; James C. Hillier of Austin, 
Minnesota, instructor in animal hus- 
bandry; Walter H. Hodge of Worces- 
ter, instructor in botany. 

Miss Horrigan was graduated from 
State College last June. She is a 
member of Phi Kappa Phi, honorary 
scholarship society. 

Mr. Frigard was graduated from 
M.S.C. in 1934. He won varsity 
letters in football, baseball, and basket- 
ball, and has been serving as assist- 
ant in the department of physical 
education. 

Mr. Hodge was graduated from 
Clark University in 1934, and last 
June earned his master of science 
degree from M.S.C He has partici- 
pated in several botanical field surveys 
and is a member of several botanical 
societies. 

Mr. Hillier, a graduate of Iowa 
siaie College in 1934, was awarded 
his Master's degree from Iowa in 1936. 
He held the positions of county club 
agent in Iowa and teaching fellow at 
Iowa State before coming to M.S.C. 

New appointees to the staff of the 
Experiment Station are Dr. Monroe 
E. Freeman who will act as research 
professor of chemistry, and Alfred A. 
Brown, who will serve as assistant re- 
search professor of agricultural eco- 
nomics. 

Dr. Freeman graduated from the 
I niversity of Minnesota and received 
his doctor's degree from there in 1931. 
He has been instructor in chemistry 
at the University of Arizona and 
unttant professor of agricultural and 
biological chemistry at the University 
"l' Maine. 

Mr Brown graduated from Massa- 
chusetts State College in 1931, and 
has received the degree of master of 
science. He has been serving as acting 
assistant research professor of agri- 
cultural economics. 

The three faculty members who 
w 'rc promoted are Arthur P. French, 
from issistant professor of pomology 
to p, :..ssor of pomology and plant 
breeding, Richard C. Foley, from 
instructor in animal husbandry to 
issistant professor in animal husban- 
r >: Dr. Claude C. Neet, from in- 
Continued on Page 2 



|Freshmen Elect 
Class Officers 



Election of temporary class officers 

° held by the freshman class in 
r "T Auditorium last Wednesday, 
s chosen are: president, Fletcher 
I'r.ut . vice-president, Betty Bates; 
er, Bob Jones; secretary, Vir- 
ginia Gale; class captain, Larry 
,ie Ran sergeant -at-arms, Al Smith. 

" 1 " above officers will supervise the 
°*gani - ition of the freshman class 

nt, i 1 ■ rmanent officers are chosen at 




President Baker 



Honor Rating 



Tin- Associated Collegiate Press 
of the National Scholastic Press 
Association, on the hush* of 
critical judgment, has awarded 
the Massachusetts Collegian u 
certificate of First Class Honor 
Bating. This rating places the 
Collegian on a high level as 
com pa i i-<l to papers of other 
small college*. There is only 
one higher rating, that of All- 
American, or superior. 



INFORMAL 
SATl RDAY NIGHT 
DRILL HALL AT 8 



Near-Record Registration 
As 322 Freshmen Enroll 




Dean Machiner 



President and Dean Welcome New Students 



The Collegian has generously offered to me this 
opportunity to express to the new students of the 
College cordial greeting and warm welcome. We are 
happy to have you with us in this fine old College and 
hope that you will be quick to make it your College 
with all that adoption in this sense implies. It is a 
peculiar though gratifying circumstance that the more 
of us there are who intimately share the College the 
more precious it seems to become. 

Adoption of the College in the sense to which I have 
referred means, first: becoming one of the College 
family. I hope that you will get acquainted early with 
your classmates, other students and the faculty. Let 
us recognize each other with cordial greeting as we 
meet upon the campus. Then, to those who faithfully 
adopt the College, its traditions will become significant 
and worthy of sincere support. 

But the most important characteristic of the College 
is sound scholarship and all her sons and daughters 
should make this their own principal objective. 

Let me again express to you, for the Administration 
and the Faculty, our very cordial welcome into the 
College family. We have high hopes for the class of 
1940 and I am sure we shall not be disappointed. 

HUGH P. BAKER, 

President 



To All New Students: 

We are glad that you elected Massachusetts State 
College as your Alma Mater and give you cordial 
welcome. You represent different communities and 
cherish individual objectives. You would not have 
come but. that you share with us a sense of the im- 
portance of collegiate education. It shall be our chief 
concern to help you realize maximum intellectual 
growth. The expenditure of time and other units of 
value can be justified only if it shall eventuate in some 
positive good to you individually and to society. 

Other generations of students have been successful in 
realizing objectives important to society. They have 
advanced the frontiers of knowledge, they have achieved 
industrial progress and made notable scientific dis- 
coveries and advances. These gains must be con- 
tinued and increased. Your generation, however, must 
give greater attention to the study of the social sciences 
in order that there may be a proper control and more 
equitable distribution of the "plenty" you have in- 
herited. 

We want you to enjoy the opportunities which this 
College can offer through the facilities provided in every 
department, to the end that progress may be easy and 
results adequate. 

WM. L. MACHMER, 

Dean 



M.S.C. Cavalrymen Encounter Wide Variety of 

Experiences During Ft. Ethan Allen Encampment 



date. 



It was with sorrowful faces that 
junior military majors watched others 
leave for their respective homes, on 
the ninth of last June, knowing that 
they themselves were about to start 
on an adventure, widely publicized by 
the tales of woe of cadets who had 
previously gone through that which 
every military major must endure. 

After an entire day spent in inten- 
sive preparation, the column of twen- 
ty-five men left familiar scenes for 
those not so familiar early on the 
morning of June 10th. 

The first day's trip was typical of 
every day and the mounties arrived 
into camp at Bernardston at about one 
o'clock — tired, sweaty, hungry, thirsty 
and dirty, particularly very tired, 
especially very sweaty, indeed very 
hungry, unquestionably very thirsty 
and above all else, very dirty. Every- 
day there was the ordeal of pitching 
shelter tents as soon as the arrival at 
camp. And after the customary half 
hour of bungling with the canvas, try- 
ing to button where there weren't any 
buttonholes and trying to make things 
straight with poles so crooked we 



could just as well have kept them in 
a hat box, we finally found ourselves 
ready for the pleasure and joy of each 
camping day — the grooming of the 
horses. Senior cadets can still hear 
that fiery ringing in their ears — that 
"Curry combs and brushes, Stand to 
Heel" — which signified for them an 
hour — and sometimes more, of the 
hard, dirty, mean and miserable work 
of acting as chamber maids to twenty- 
seven army nags. 

Kipling's Old Home Town 

The second day took the glorified 
Hoy Scouts to a spot called Dunners- 
ton, Vermont, the spot Rudyard Kip- 
ling chose in America for solitude, 
that being all there is to find there. 
En route to this paradise for all tour- 
ists, Roy Clark and his mount Bertha 
were hit by a truck. Bertha broke her 
leg and had to be shot — but not until 
Captain Conner U. S. A. could borrow 
a gun from a neighboring farm house. 
And so the army proceeded on its way. 

Eating out of mess kits while in the 
field was a treat which none of those 
condemned will not soon forget. A 
mess kit, dear readers, happens to be 



an aluminum pan into which every- 
thing from the soup to the nuts is dis- 
pensed, a cover which can be used as 
a bread and butter plate, yet seldom 
is, an aluminum cup which has the 
capacity of retaining its hot white 
heat long after the fiery "army Java" 
has cooled, and a knife, fork and 
spoon. Three times each day these 
utensils were used and three times 
again they were dipped and cleansed 
(Oh Yeah?) in buckets of boiling 
water. That according to that much 
quoted book, Army Rules and Regu- 
lations, was the proper way, in fact, 
the only way, to eat. 

The third day out saw the detach- 
ment posting to Saxton's River, and 
then on the next day — Saturday morn- 
ing — a quick trip to Springfield which 
meant a two day stay. Saturday 
night meant everybody out of camp 
except for the poor guard detail. 
Nightly four of the traveling cow 
punchers were assigned to stand guard 
the equine horde for a twenty-four 
hour tour. Watches would last for two 
hours at a time and some of the fel- 

Conti nucd on Page I 



25 Transfers; Other 
Lists not Complete 



According to a late report from the 
Registrar's office, 322 students have 
registered in the class of 1940. This 
number is an even dozen short of 
last year's record enrollment, but it is 
still above the usual quota of 300. 
Twenty-five students have transferred 
into the three upper classes. 

Sophomore, junior and senior en- 
rollment had not been completed at 
press time. 

The freshman list is as follows: 



GIRLS 

Abrams, Betty V. 
Alvord, Edna 
Archibald, Jean M. 
Archibald, Priscilla B. 
Bak, Mildred 
Banuzkewic, Anna M. 
Barton, Beryl 
Bates, Mary E. 
Bluemer, Charlotte E. 
Bowman, Louise 
Bradshaw, Marie T. 
Campbell, Janet 
Carew, Pauline 
Carpenter, Jean P. 
Carpenter, Millicent 
Chapin, Hazel R. 
Clark, Edith M. 
Cooper, Kathleen F. 
( "oreoran, Anne K. 
Creesy, Lorraine 
Davis, Ida B. 
Doran. Katherine H. 
Dec, Anne S. 
Dunham, Agnes A. 
Ellery, Evelyn D. 
Karnsworth, Reaetta B 
Firth, Margaret A. 
Flynn, Mary V. 
Gale, Virginia 
Garipay, Ruth V. 
Glazier, Thelma N. 
Gould, Evelyn A. 
Graves, Myra C. 
Hall, Frieda L. 
Holmes, Paula Y. 
Howe, Elizabeth M. 
Irwin, Marjorie 
Jackson, Olive G. 
Jacobs, Priscilla 
Jewell, Eleanor F. 
Johnson, Margery D. 
Kelly, Dorothy M. 
Kohls, Rosa F. E. 
Kenny, Loretta C. 
I^amon, Ruth D. 
Kunsela, Ruth M. 



Springfield 

Turners Falls 

No. Amherst 

Norwood 

Hadley 

Pittsfield 

No. Adams 

Pittsfield 

Holyoke 

Med ford 

Chicopee Falls 

Springfield 

Worcester 

Webster 

Worcester 

Sheffield 

Sunderland 

Amherst 

Stoneham 

Westwood 

E. Taunton 

Amherst 

Hadley 

Gloucester 

Worcester 

Lawrence 

Stock bridge 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Leverett 

Walpole 

Sunderland 

Braintree 

Winthrop 

Pittsfield 

Palmer 

Monson 

Holliston 

Worcester 

Southboro 

Watertown 

Dorchester 

Palmer 

No. Adams 

Gardener 



I^eete. Catherine M. 

Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 



Levy. Roma D. 
Little, Barbara 
Luce, Nancy E. 
Maddocks, Mary E. 
Malm, Irma I. 
Marshall, Helen A. 
Matuszko, Victoria 
Merrill, Dorothy 
Messer, Genevieve E. 



Pittsfield 

Newbury port 

Fitch burg 

Foxboro 

Worcester 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Norwood 

Spencer 



Continued on Page i 



German Group At 
First Social Union 

During the first semester, the Social 
Union will present three exceptionally 
fine programs, all of them musical. 

On Tuesday, October 27, the Ger- 
man Student Group will appear. 
They are about twenty students at 
German conservatories who have won 
first prizes in competition. They are 
making a good-will tour of a few 
selected American colleges and uni- 
versities and while here will sleep in 
the dormitories and fraternity houses. 
Continued on I'agr 2 



2 



THE MASSACHUSETTS CQ1XECHAN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 



1936 



THE MASSACHISETTS COLLEC.IAN. Till RSHAY. SEPTEMBER 24. WMi 




/IftaeeacbueeflP^ Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State Collet* 
LOUIS A. BREAULT 'Z7. Editor-in-chief 



Published every Thursday by the s tudent*. 



FREDERICK LINDSTROM "38. Managing Editor 



WALTER GURALNICK '37. Associate Editor 

CAMPUS DEPARTMENT 

Newt 
PHILIP B. SHIFF '37, Campus Editor 
RICHARD C. DESMOND 37 
JAMES S. WALDMAN 37 




STANLEY A. FLOWER "38 
MARY P. OCONNELL '38 
MAURICE TONKIN '38 
ROBERTA D. WALKEY 38 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE "39 
NORMAN THOMAS 39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 



CLIFFORD E. 



Athletic* 
JULIAN H. KATZEFF '38. Editor 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 
ALFRED M. SWIREN '3S 
THOMAS J. ENRIGHT '39 

Make-up Editor 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37 

Stock bridge Correspondent 
KENNETH MASON S'36 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 

BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37. Business Manager 
SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr. 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38. Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

DONALD L. SILVERMAN^ 

SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME 38 

SUBSCRIPTIONS WOO PER YEAR 



In case of change of address, subscriber 



u.k. all ardars Mvmbte te Tin U*it*(kmtUi Cottsfts* 
asBce before 9 o'clock. Monday evening. 



1935 Member 1936 
Pbsocided Golle6iale Press 

Distributor of 

Golle6iate DitSest 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pest Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In Section 1103 
Act of October 1917. authorised August 20 

1918. 

Printed by The~Klngsbury Press. 82 North 
Street. Northampton. Mass.. Telephone 554 



EDITCRIAL 

TO THE CLASS OF 1940 

Are you bewildered by your preliminary round of freshman 
activities'? Transition from high school to college is somewhat 
bewUdering, yet if you make the change properly, you will have 
successfully completed one of the most important phases of your 
adult career. ,_ A m n nn nna not 



You are adults now, you know A year or so ago, no one 
even your parents, would have dared call you such without a 
twinge of conscience. But now, because you are in college, you 
mSst think and act as befits an adult. Education for you now is 



not spoon and bottle process, but an experience to be under 

gone with the adult characteristics of responsibility, concern and 

adaptability^ ^ ^ ^^ be y You ^11 be 

shown about and treated like a visitor on a sightsee ing tour. 
You will be examined, catalogued and ordered about - all be- 
cause the college wants to help you in your transitional process. 
BilTto you alone falls the problem of formulating a collegiate 
program 



One columnist has the idea of leav- 
ing his typewriter and his desk with a 
note pinned thereto simply saying 
"Gone fishing." Such a dirge is often 
with this writer. Other columnists 
satisfy the urge by chopping comments 
from other papers. Then too there 
was the one who actually did let his 
column appear blank once, only to be 
beseiged with readers expressing their 
appreciation. It's an idea. 

First of all, a note to you people 
who have such a time of going to 
sleep because of business or monkey- 
business worries . . . there is nothing 
like eating a banana before going to 
bed, and then you slide right to sleep. 
And with that, we pass right on and 
pay homage to the columnist who tells 
us that there is only one way to get a 
professor out of the room. That is to 
teU him that he is overpaid and he 
will go through the roof. 

One of the students at a neighboring 
college answering a magazine adver- 
tisement promising to give informa- 
tion as to the means of acquiring a lot 
of money easily. Of course, the 
nominal sum of one dollar was charged 
for the giving of this information. In 
a few days the student received this 
answer, "Do as I did, brother." 

Professors were astounded recently 
by a theme discussing the progress of 
civilization in which it was declared: 
"Aristotle, one of the most learned 
men of ancient times couldn't speak a 
word of English." 

The story is told of one of our own 
professors who, upon discovering a pup 
in one of his classes, ordered, "Will 
one of you please take the animal 
out." When the command was exe- 
cuted, he explained, "After all, ^ we 
have to draw the line somewhere." 



^Musical J*/ote. 



THE CAPKHART 

Two years ago, the college received 
from the Carnegie Corporation the 
gift of a College Music Set, consisting 
of a Capehart phonograph, a collection 
of over eight hundred records, about 
two hundred and fifty scores, and a 
library of one hundred and twenty-five 
books. This fine equipment is located 
in the seminar room in the basement 
of the Goodell Library, and is avail- 
able to all members of the college. 
The room is open at stated times under 
supervision. A list of the hours will 
be posted shortly in the library and 
elsewhere on the campus. 

New students are invited to ac- 
quaint themselves with this oppor- 
tunity to hear good music in pleasant 
surroundings. 



:-: Vesper opeak 



pea 1 



;gps :-: 



that will make your college life a success 



One member of the faculty of the 
University of North Carolina an- 
nounced in a recent lecture that in his 
opinion "Garbo is lousy, 
piteous, Dietrich trivial." 



Crawford 
Yeh. We 

wrote them for pictures and failed to 

get them too. 



MASS MEETING 

All students who are interested in 
the various activities of the State 
College musical organizations are in- 
vited to attend a mass meeting in 
Bowker Auditorium, Stockbridge Hall, 
next Tuesday evening, Sept. 29, at 
8 o'clock. The purpose of this meeting 
is to make general announcements of 
plans for the year's work, to discuss 
details of policy, and to receive appli- 
cations for membership. 

The program of the Club's activities 
last year included the production of 
Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta, "Trial 
by Jury," a concert program by the 
combined clubs, a two-day trip by the 
Men's Glee Club, as well as several 
local and out-of-town engagements for 
individual organizations. This year 
it is hoped to undertake an even more 
ambitious program, which will require 
the active support of a large member- 
ship. In particular, students who are 
interested in accompanying, in stage 
managing and costuming are asked to 
attend the meeting and make them- 
selves known. 

The managers of this year's organi- 
zations are Richard Irving '38, Or- 
chestra; Bernard Kohn '38, Men's 
Glee Club; and Barbara Keck '37, 
Women's Glee Club. They will be 
glad to meet applicants at anytime 
before the meeting. 

It is particularly important that all 
old members be present. 



Time: Sundays at 5:00 
Place: Memorial Hall Auditorium 

Sept. 27: Dr. James Gordon Gilkey 
of Springfield, speaking on "New 
Starts in Life." 
Oct. 4: Dr. Michael Williams, Editor, 

The Commonweal. 
Oct. 18: Prof. Kirtly Mather, Harvard 
Oct. 25: Rev. A. L. Kinsolving, Trin- 
ity Church, Boston. 
Nov. Is Prof. Frank P. Rand, M.S.C. 
Nov. 8: Lecturer from The First 
Church of Christ Scientist, Boston. 
Nov. 15: Dr. James Gordon Gilkey, 

Springfield. 
Nov. 22: Rabbi Abraham J. Feldman, 

Hartford. 
Dec. 6: Prof. Harry N. Glick, M.S.C. 
Dec. 13: Dr. Edwin B. Robinson 

Grace Church, Holyoke. 
Jan. 10: Mr. W. J. Kitchen, Executive 
to the New England Student Christ- 
ian Movement. 
Jan. 17: Prof. James T. Cleland, 

Amherst College. 
Jan. 24: Pres. Hugh P. Baker, M.S.C. 
Jan. 31: Rev. J. Paul Williams, M.S.C. 
Feb. 14: Annual Student Religious 
Council Conference, led by a 
Catholic. 
Feb. 28: Prof. Andrew Kerr, Colgate. 
Mar. 7: Prof. S. Ralph Harlow, Smith. 
Mar. 14: Rev. Hilda Ives, Portland. 
Mar. 21: Rabbi Milton Steinberg, 
New York City. 

Dr. Gilkey, the first speaker is a 
well known figure on campus, having 
appeared at numerous vesper services. 




SPORTS 




Soccer And Cross Country 
Teams Await Oct. 3, Opener 




Vour greatest concern wiU.be ^J^}t^±f a A^} 



relaShfp^rwVn^youV curricular and extra-curricular activi- i And of course, we must have Just 

tie? Studies of course, come first, but since campus activities are one more. 

of sufficient value to be considered an important part of modern 

coUegiate education, you will find it very worth while to devote 

some of vour time to them. Just how much time you will spend 

iHny of the various activities this col ege affords is up to you 

but a good piece of advice to follow is this: Don't try to do 

everything: whatever your talents are, select the one or two 

activities that allows them the best chances of expression, and 

pursue those activities with everything you have in you - but 

^o^musTUtfor^t that the sooner you decide on a course 
of study for yourselves, the easier will be your next four years 
here You? freshman year is so planned for you that vou should 
be able to find from its courses a study group in which you shall 
want to specialize. Find that group as soon as you can and your 
coUege work will mean a great deal more to you ; People who go 
through college dabbling in this and that taking all the gut 
coursei" they can crowd into their curriculum are wasting time 

the L n ;ortVnrtoo gai will be your social life.. Nothing, much need 
be said about that, except that it's the easiest thing in college to 
make a fool of yourself over. ... ..,« 

And so with this preliminary word of advice, the editorial 
and business boards of the Massachusetts Collegian wish to express 
t? vou a cordial welcome to Massachusetts State You've picked 
a good college. For the next four years you will be among a very 
democratic group of people. Faculty and students are going to 
combine to make you feel at home in a new environment. And 
si ? nTe that is one of the functions of this newspaper, we hope you 
Wffl meke full use of the Massachusetts Collegian to better acquaint 
yourselves with the goings-on here. 



FACULTY PROMOTIONS 

Continued from Page 1 
structor in education to assistant pro- 
fessor of education. 

In the Extension Service Melby W. 
Brady was appointed as assistant 
State Club Leader. Mr. Brady gradu- 
ated from Ohio University in 1920 
He has acted as County 4-H Club 
agent in Muskingum County. Ohio, 
and as State Club leader at Ohio 
University. He comes to M.S.C. as a 
special representative of the Connecti- 
cut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 



Knock, Knock 

Who's there? 

Humphry. 

Humphry who? 

Humphry ever blowing bubbles. 

Sigma: Say, your hat is on wrong. 
Phi: Well, how do you know which 
way I'm going? 

The newcomer rapped at the Pearly 
Gates. "Who's there?" inquired St. 
Peter from within. "It is I," was the 
answer. "Go away. We don't want 
any more professors up here." 

He said he was going to name his 
fraternity pin "Old Soldier' because it 
had been on so many fronts. 

"Well," said the heiress as she 

eloped with the family driver, "I've 

got something to chauffeur my 
money." 



CAMPUS CALKNHAK 



PIANISTS 

Students who are studying the piano 
and wish to make arrangements for 
practice should know that the college 
maintains a piano in the Memorial 
Building, the use of which may be 
hired for a small sum. Any student 
wishing to take advantage of this 
opportunity should see Mr. Stratton 
as soon as possible. 



RECORDS AT HOME 

In response to a continued demand 
on the part of many students who 
wish to borrow phonograph records 
for home enjoyment and study, a 
meeting will be held next Tuesday at 
4:30 o'clock in the Auditorium of the 
Memorial Building to discuss plans 
for the formation of a cooperative 
lending library of records. Since the 
success of such a venture depends 
largely upon the number participat- 
ing, all who are interested should 
attend the meeting or see either Mr. 
Stratton or Mr. Coding beforehand. 



SOCIAL UNION 

Continued from Page 1 
The second program, Friday, Nov. 
26, is one of piano music by Harold 
Bauer, one of the best musicians in 
the country. Because of the high 
caliber of his art he is often called 
the musician's musician. Mr. Bauer 
will also spend some of his two days 
in conference with the musical groups 
on campus. 

Last on the program are the Don 
Cossacks, who will appear on Dec. 12. 
Started in Paris they now have almost 
their original force and are one of the 
most successful of their kind of per 
formers. The group is composed of 
white Russians and cossacks, singing 
th^ir native and other songs. 



Prospects for the fall season of the 
M.S.C. cross-country team appear 
none too bright, according to Coach 
Llewellyn L. Derby. With the first 
encounter of the schedule coming a 
week from Saturday, the squad docs 
not have much time to train for the 
gruelling four-mile trek against Spring- 
field College. 

With Proctor and Gillette lost thru 
graduation last June, chances that 
someone will take their places on the 
learn seem slight this year. Five 
• ttermen of last season are again 
available. They are Mitchell Ne.Jame, 
Osgood Villaume, Henry Sampson, 
Kdgar Beaumont, Melvin Little. Prom- 
ising sophomores are Ralph Reed, 
Irving Reade, Charles Slater, Larry 
Bixby, and Pickard, who is as yet 
undecided whether he will compete 
i his fall. Other men who will prob- 
ably he in the running are Roberts, 
Whitney, Dave Beaumont, Whitte- 
mure, and Couhig. 

The crosscountry schedule, which 
opens at home with Springfield will 
be as follows: 
|Oct, 3 Springfield at M.S.C. 

10 Northeastern at Boston 

17 M.I.T. at M.S.C. 

24 W.P.I, at M.S.C. 

31 Amherst at M.S.C. 
Nov. 9 New Englands at Boston 

13 R.P.I, at Troy 

Seven Soeeermeii Honored 

The names of seven Maroon and 
White soccer players grace the honor 
roll of the Intercollegiate Soccer Guide 
of 1936. The Soccer Guide each year 
eumpiles a list of the outstanding 
booters playing in the Intercollegiate 
eugue. Statesmen listed are: David- 
on '36, Haselhuhn '36, Gillett '36, 
Weinberger '36, Kennedy '37 and 
)sley '38. 

The first practice sessions of the 

eason are being devoted to a thorough 

tudy of the fundamentals of the 

ame. Thirty-four candidates are 

ompeting daily for positions, and 

oach Larry Briggs, facing an excep- 

ionally difficult schedule, is anxiously 

• arching the group for material to 

ill the gaping vacancies left by the 

raduation last June of Haselhuhn, 

lavidson, Sweinberger, Gillett, and 

Varlmutter. Remaining lettermen 

ho now form the nucleus of a team 

ire: Kyle '37, Captain Kennedy '37, 

\dams '38, Silverman '38, Feinberg 

17, Osley '38, Buzzee '38, Conant 

137, Couper '38, and Golub '38. 



INSTRUCTOR 




ABOUT THE CAMPUS . . . 

We noticed that the long awaited 
women's athletic field behind the 
physi-ed building has finally been 
completed. Curry Hicks, who has 
spent much time and effort in putting 
this federal project through, says that 
the field will be used this fall. It is 
not that we underestimate the State 
co-eds, but sometimes we wonder. 
Asked what she thought of the new 
women's athletic field, one sophomore 
co-ed replied, "What new field? Do 
you mean the new parking space 
they're making?" 



Caraway Finds Dearth 

Of Football Material 



Bill Frigard 



Coach Briggs is no longer instructor 
in the required physical education 
courses, but is now extension specialist 
in recreation. The courses in physical 
education will be taught this year by 
Sid Kauffman. 

The soccer schedule follows: 
Oct. 3 ' W. P. I. at Worcester 
10 Conn. State at Storrs 
17 Williams at Williamstown 
21 Yale at M.S.C. 
24 Tufts at Medford 
30 Amherst at M.S.C. 
Nov. 7 Trinity at Hartford 
13 Wesleyan at M.S.C. 



The faculty in the division of physi- 
cal education point with pride to their 
new fly swatters. We noticed that the 
best equipped swatters are equipped 
with new red and blue swatters this 
year. Upon inquiry we learned that 
the new implements were donated to 
the division by its head, Prof. Hicks. 




We don't know, we only heard . . . 
but its rumored that the soon-to-be 
appointed coach of basketball, and 
the newly appointed instructor in the 
division, are one and the same per- 
son. As we say, we don't know and 
it hardly official; its only what we 
heard whispered. 



PIIYS. El). COURSES REVISED 



Revisions have been made this year 
in the physical education courses for 
freshmen and sophomores. The course 
for freshmen will extend through the 
entire college year, and will consist of 
one hour a week of instruction in 
carry-over value and life-time Rport, 
and participation in team games. The 
life-time sports to be taught in the 
one-hour period include hiking, touch 
football, archery, badminton, skiing, 
skating, volleyball, swimming, soft- 
ball, golf, and tennis. The team games, 
in two of which the freshman is re- 
quired to participate, include football, 
soccer, swimming, cross-country, track, 
basketball, and baseball. 

The course for sophomores is elec- 
tive. Men may elect two seasonal 
athletic activities per semester or 
their equivalent. 



Coach Derby predicts at least one 
cross-country win this fall. Coach 
Caraway goes him one better and 
predicts two, maybe. Is this the usual 
line they give us before the season, or 
do they mean it? We'll see. 



LIST OF HORSES 



ATTEND THE 



iUSH AND FRIGARD ASSISTING 
COACH CARAWAY ON GRIDIRON 




Adelphia Rally 



Lou Bush, State's stellar athlete 
rhile an undergraduate, was recently 



AND 



THE COLLEC.IAN RECORD 

The editor wishes to call special attention to the top center 
column box on the front page announcing the honor recent y 
SJen the Massachusetts Collegian. Honors of this sort are usually 
considered a credit to the editor, but we would be usurping honors 
be"onglng rightly to others if we were to take all the credit our- 

SelV F , Lt of all there is the staff. They have worked hard and 
conscientiously to make what has been finally proved an excel- 

le \ C h enThe P re P fs r the business staff, the "silent partners" in this 
organization. Nobody ever hears much from them, yet their 
exoe? handling of business affairs has allowed more printing of 
natures and ofher technical aids to the making of a good paper • Tu^-y. Srpt. ■ 

And last, but certainly not least, there is the past editor It 
was of papers printed under his incumbency that most ot trie 

StU 1t iTthe m promise of the present editor and staff that the self- 
same quality that gained the paper this recognition will 
tinue and. impossible, improve. 



Thursday, Sept. 24 

8 a.m. All classes begin. 

9 a.m. -4 p.m. Freshmen call at the 
President's office to have regis- 
tration cards signed. 

4-5.30 p.m. Mental tests. 

7 p.m. Adelphia Bonfire. 
Friday, Sept. 23 

8 p.m. Freshman Reception. 
Saturday, Sept. 26 

4 p.m. Rope pull across the pond. 
8 p.m. Informal, Drill Hall. 

Sunday, Sept. 27 

5 p.m. Vespers. James Gordon 
Gilkey. 



con- 



7 p.m. Hand tryouts, Mem. Bldg. 
7.30 p.m. Collegian Competition. 

8 p.m. Mass meeting of musical 

clubs, Stockbridge. 

Wednesday, Sept. 30 

8 p.m. Orchestra rehearsal, M Bldg. 



Orchestra R«-lienr*iil 

There will be a rehearsal of the 
8rchestra next Wednesday evening at 
o in the Memorial Building. All 
freshmen interested are urged to be 
present as well as old members. 

Christian Federation 

The newly elected members of the 
freshmen cabinet of the Christian 
Federation are Miss Johnson, Daley. 
Blake. Miss Howe, Miss Pratt, Wash- 
burn, and Phillips. 

Meeting of MsMMftMl 

The sports editor would like to 
meet all managers and assistant mana- 
gers of fall sports tomorrow night at 
the Collegian office in the Memorial 
Building at 6.30 p.m. The meeting 
will be a short one to facilitate pub- 
licity and will not interfere with the 
rallv. Please attend. 



Conflagration 



THURSDAY AT SEVEN 



HEAR: 

Some Varsity Captains 

An Editor 

a Roister Hoist er 

An Alumni Secretory 

A Hnnce Representative 

A Rand Manager 

And Probably More 

COME AMI RAISE A KI'MI'I - 




•mted graduate assistant in the 

i<»n of physical education. Ixni is 

assisting Coach Caraway as 



back field coach. Among the new 
appointments to the faculty in the 
division is Bill Frigard, who is now 
an instructor and is also with the 
football team, putting the linemen 
through the paces. 

Lou, a three-sport man while at 
State, e.irned nine letters as an 
undergraduate. In 1932 he was the 
nation's leading collegiate football 
scorer, and is at present the property 
of the St. Louis Cards, playing with 
their columbus team in the American 
Association. Lou will be on campus 
until next spring when he will rejoin 
the Cardinals. 

Bill Frigard, newly appointed in- 
structor, is beginning his second year 
at Stale Since his graduation in '34, 
Frigard. who is a Phi Kappa Phi man 
has taught and coached in Wrentham 
High. He is a member of Lambda 
('hi Alpha. 

Resides being classmates in '34, 
Bill and Lou were teammates on the 
team which made football history at 
Mass. Stale Lou was a halfback and 
Frigard a fullback. Both men were 
members of the oft-mentioned unde- 
feated basketball team of '33-'34. 



No. 


Name 


1 


Masterpiece 


2 


Romeyn 


3 


H ughes 


4 


Watkins 


5 


Wood 


6 


Shy Ann 


7 


Amherst 


8 


Bob 


9 


Stewart 


10 


HUand 


11 


Powder 


12 


Randy 


13 


Henry 


14 


Ceres 


15 


Buddy 


17 


Cheney 


18 


Sumner 


19 


Wihry 


20 


Kennett 


21 


Bush 


22 


Johnny Hyde 


23 


Marlene 


24 


Connie 


25 


Micky 


26 


Willard 


27 


George 


28 


Clarke 


29 


Malloch 


30 


Nora 


31 


Bulman 


32 


J. K. 


33 


Julius 


34 


Cole 


35 


Daybreak 


36 


Foskett 


37 


Frank 


38 


Al Mann 


39 


Utah 


41 


Colonel 


42 


Clark 


43 


Opal 


44 


Shaw 


45 


Dan 


47 


Cinci 


48 


Molly 


49 


Bonny 


50 


Susie 


51 


Salter 


53 


O'Neil 


54 


Cy 


55 


Kate 


57 


Bill 


58 


Ted Grant 


59 


Joe M. 


60 


King's Medal 



Age 
8 

7 



15 
26 
13 
26 

6 
16 

9 
18 
13 
22 

6 

8 

8 

9 
18 

9 

8 
20 

5 
20 

7 
20 

8 
9 

11 
15 
7 
21 
16 
16 
21 
6 
10 
9 
8 
10 
19 
18 
18 
9 
6 
20 
9 
21 
18 
8 
6 





VARSITY 


1 

Otto 


OOTBAIX SCHEDULE 


l»er 


I 


Howdoin at Brunswick 


10 


Conn. State at Storrw 


17 


R. I. State ut M.S.C. 


24 


W.P.I, at M.S.C. 


31 


Amherst at M.S.C. 


Nove 


miter 


7 


Coast Guard, New I^ondon 


14 


R.IM. at Troy 


1 » 


Tufts ut Medford 



I93S REVIEW 



42 Men in Fall 

Football Training 

Inexperience and ineligibility seem 
destined to give State rooters many a 
dismal moment during the next few 
weeks. With the opening name against 
Bowdoin but a little more than a week 
away. Coach Eb Caraway is Working 
hard in the hope of being ahle to pick 
a combination of eleven men who plus 
good enough football to start the open- 
ing game at Brunswick on Oct. 3, 

At present, forty-two men are work- 
ing out daily under the three State 
coaches, Caraway, hush and Kngard. 
The group is willing enough and plays 
with a lot of enthusiasm, a factor 
which may make up for lack of ex- 
perience when the Maroon and White 
ball-toters trot out on the field. How- 
ever, the loss of the Kiel brothers 
through ineligibility and injury, Boh 
Peckham, the outstanding candidate 
for the quarterback berth, and "Taut" 
Bongiolatti, an outstanding guard of 
last year's eleven is enough to darken 
the outlook of any club. 

To give him a little encouragement 
in his work, Coach Caraway has a 
small group of last year's regulars to 
look to as a nucleus for the 1936 
Statesman football machine. Heading 
the list of veterans in the line-up, is 
Dave Rossiter, captain and center of 
the team. Rossiter has been the out- 
standing lineman for two years now. 
He is capable and big enough to in- 
sure the middle of the State line giving 
the opposition much trouble this sea- 
Continued on Page 4 



"Statesmen won five (Conn. State 
25-12, Rhode Island 7-6, W.P.I. 20-0, 
Rensselaer 28-13, Tufte 19-13) in- 
cluding victory over Tufts, ancient 
rivals, but dropped four to stiff oppo- 
sition (Williams 0-28, Bowdoin 6-7, 
Amherst 0-13, N.U. 12-13). Elmer 
Allen featured the Connecticut State 
triumph with a sixty-yard dash, and 
Emil Koenig turned in a 58-yard run 
against Rhode Island. David Rossiter, 
who has been an outstanding center 
for two seasons, is captain." 

Reprint from Spalding's Official 
Intercollegiate Football Guide 



SPORTS MANAGERS 

The sports editor would like to 
meet all managers and assistant 
managers of fall sports tonight at 
the Collegian office in the Mem 
Building at 6.30 p.m. The meeting 
is to facilitate publicity. It will be 
a short one, and will not interfere 
with the rally. 



JE//E 
OWEN/, 

OHIO STATE FLASH , 
COMPETED IN 52 
EVENTS LAST SEASON 
AND WON 44 FIRSTS, 
SIX SECONDS AND 
TWO THIRDS/ 




A. T. Wilaon W. *• Londergan 

THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 

Northampton, Mi 



Telephone 554 



\ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Tlll'KSDAY. SEPTEMBER 24, 1936 



RUSHING RULES ARE CHANGED; 
DECREASE IN EXPENSES NOTED 



The new rushing rules of the Inter- 
fraternity Council were announced 
this week and show a few minor 
changes. The most important change 
of all relates to a new feature called 
"open rushing," a period during which 
all freshmen are free to come and go 
through all of the fraternity houses at 
their will. This is in an effort to allow 
freshmen and upperclassmen to be- 
come acquainted under the most 
normal of conditions. The complete 
rules follow: 

SECTION 1. The rushing season 
shall .-tart at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, 
September 21, 1936 (Freshman Regis- 
tration Day) at a meeting ot all fresh- 
men En Memorial Hall, and shall end 
»n Sunday. October 4, 1936, with an- 
other meeting of all freshmen in Me- 
morial Hall. Freshmen shall be 
pledged in a special freshmen chapel 
on Monday morning, October '>. 1986 
at 7:45 a.m. 

SECTION 2. (a) After a brief 
explanatory lecture at the Monday 
evening (Sept. 21) session, fieshnn-n 
will be escorted for three successive 
nights (Monday, Sept. 21 through 
Wednesday, Sept. 23) through all the 
eleven fraternity houses on the cam- 
pus. Visits shall last twenty minutes 
in each house (7:00-7:20, 7:30-7:50, 
and 8:00-8:20 p.m.) Four houses shall 
be visited by each freshman each 
night except on Wednesday night 
when each freshman shall visit three 
houses. 

(b) On Thursday, Sept. 24, Friday, 
Sept. 25, and Saturday, Sept. 26, 
"open house" shall be held by all fra- 
ternities. All freshmen are invited to 
visit at will during these three days. 
No freshmen will be allowed to eat in 
the houses during this period, nor will 
they be allowed to go anywhere or do 
anything where the expenditure of 
money on the part of fraternities, or 
individual members is involved. Dur- 
ing this open period, all upperclassmen 
may visit freshmen in dormitories and 
the same rules shall apply here. (This 
period is supposed to permit fratern- 
ity men and freshmen to become ac- 
quainted with each other under norm- 
al conditions.) 

ic) Date cards will be handed out 
to freshmen at a time to be set later 
by the Interfraternity Council. These 
date cards shall indicate the time 
which the various fraternities wish to 
. ntertain certain freshmen during the 
"closed date period" which runs Sun- 
day, Sept. 27 until 5 p.m. in the after- 
noon. These invitations shall contain 
a maximum of one date. A date shall 
be limited to Sunday morning or to 
Sunday afternoon. Freshmen may ac- 
cept only one of these dates. Th.-se 
'la:.- cards shall be returned to the 
Interfraternity Council president at a 
time to be designated when they are 
-tied. The president in turn shall 
return the date cards to the various 
fratern;'. 

( d i On Monday, Sept. 28, through 

W< dnesday, Sept. 30, "closed rushing" 

-hall be in effect. Closed rushing 

>hall mean that no freshman will be 

allowed to go inside of a fraternity 

hou.-e, neither .-hall upperclassmen be 

v. d to go into freshmen rooms or 

dormitories. In any conversation be- 

• n fre.-hm* n and upperclassmen, 

the subject of fraternities or matters 

pertaining thereto, shall not be <]i- 

. • <i 

(e) On Thursday, October ] and 

Friday, October 2, a second "open 

house" period -hall be in effect. Here 

gain, "fraternities shall not .-p<md 

ney" on fre-hnr n. 

if) At a time and a plat- to be let 

.. the Interfraternity Council, 

Invitation for anoth' i doted, date 

period shall en out. Thii second 

period of dates shall be held 

Mid Sunday, Oct. 

4. 1986 H< •• again fn hmen may \»- 

nd only one third of ■ 

day (from breakfs t to dinner, from 

'. Upper i or from upper to 

w,th a fraternity. 

■ ing will ' on 

■ ;.', October 4, 1 'f!'i at 

§ pm, At a ipeclal meeting of all 

fr^ihm'-r. thai the Memor 

.. H ill or. that i reninf it 7 :.;u i all 



R.O.T.C. RECEIVES 
FIVE NEW HORSES 

Five new horses were received by 
the college R.O.T.C. unit from the 
Front Royal, Virginia, remount depot 
during September, Lt. Col. Horace T. 
Aplington. commandant announced 
recently. 

One of the bones has been officially 
named Wat kins, in honor of Major 
Herbert E. Wat kins, who was trans- 
ferred in July to the Third Cavalry 
at Fort Ft ban Allen, after four years 
at Stale. 

Three horses have been named 
Wood, Kennett and Clark, in honor 
of three ranking cadets of the class 
of 1936. 

The fifth animal will be known as 
Julius, named for the mythical orderly 
who, according to Col. Aplington, 
"performed numerous imaginary duties 
for the class of 1937 during the march 
to and from Fort Ethan Allen last 
June and July." 



fraternity bids shall be awarded to 
freshmen. No members or representa- 
tives of fraternities or of the three up- 
perclasses shall talk or communicate 
with any freshmen between 5 p.m. 
Sunday, October 4 and 7:30 p.m. 
Monday, Oct. 5, 193d. 

(h) A special freshman chapel will 
be held on Monday morning, October 
5, 193(5 at 7:30 a.m. at Stockbridge 
auditorium at the close of which fresh- 
men will be allowed to wear the pin 
of the fraternity which they wish to 
pledge. Unaccepted bids shall be re- 
turned to the president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council at the end of this 
chapel. 

SECTION 8. (a) No freshman shall 
be permitted to sleep overnight in a 
fraternity house from the opening of 
the fall rushing season to the close of 
the fall rushing season. 

( b ) Freshmen shall not be allowed 
to accept invitations for dates or bids 
for pledgeships, except those issued 
through the Interfraternity Council. 

(c) Freshmen shall not be allowed 
to indicate their fraternity preference 
to any upperclassmen before the 
special chapel on Monday, October 5, 
1936. 

(d) No invitation to membership 
tn a fraternity in the conference shall 
be given to any student who has not 
matriculated as a regular four-year 
student at the Massachusetts State 
College. 

SECTION 4. (a) Any infringement 

of any of these rules shall constitute 
a misdemeanor and the accused shall 
be tried by the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil. 

(b) Fraternities or individuals hav- 
ing complaints to make shall make 
them to the Intel fraternity Council. 

SECTION 5. (a) The wearing of a 
pin or button binds the freshman to 
the fraternity whose insignia he wears 
in freshman chapel and by this he 
-hall not be eligible to membership in 
any other fraternity for one year from 
date of dropping. All pledges drop- 
ping out from a fraternity shall be re- 
quired to report the same immediate- 
ly to the secretary of tlv- Interfratern- 
ity Council. 

SECTION <>. (a) False information 
concerning other hOBsea -hall not be 
given out by any fraternity or indi- 
vidual to freshmen. 

(b) Other fraternities, their mem- 
or their policies shall not be dis- 

d by fraternity men with th« Ir 
prospectivs pledges. 

SECTION 7. No freshman pledgea 
to a fraternity during the regular 

rushing I I on -hall !«• allowed to b>' 
initiated into that fraternity until a 
ch'iiar. hip average of at bast 669f 
be attained ai Rhown by the Dean's 
Office for the fir.-t . lift t.i. After 
that time, no pledge hall be initiated 
■ a member of u fraternity until he 
ha ic< ■ fully maintained that ever 

f'ii i,w half a term. 

SECTION R. fa) 'lb. a rata hall 
be printed in th" Fn bman Hand- 



RULES GOVERNING 
THE RAZ00 NIGHT 
CLASS RIVALRY 

1. The contest will begin in the 
Physical Education Cage at 7:00 p.m. 
Friday, October 2. All Sophomores 
and Freshmen are requested to be 
present at 6:45 p.m. 

2. The contest will be divided into 
the following three sections: 

1. Boxing and wrestling matches. 

2. The "night-shirt" contest. 

3. The "battle royal." 

3. Five points will be awarded to 
the winner of each boxing or wrestling 
match. 

4. After the boxing and wrestling, 
Freshmen will leave the Cage, crawl- 
ing on their hands and knees between 
a double line of Sophomores. 

5. An arena of suitable size shall be 
roped off on the lower level for the 
"night shirt" contest. There shall be 
a "pen" roped off on each end of the 
enclosure. 

6. The freshmen and sophomore 
classes shall form concentric circles 
inside the enclosure, the sophomores 
forming the outer circle. 

7. At the first pistol shot the 
sophomores shall move in one indi- 
cated circular direction. 

8. At the second pistol shot the 
sophomores shall break their circle 
and attempt to remove the "night 
shirts" from the freshmen. Only one 
sophomore may encounter one fresh- 
man. 

9. At the end of ten minutes two 
pistol shots in succession shall end the 
contest. 

10. The sophomore class shall re- 
ceive one point credit for each "night 
shirt" removed, and the freshmen 
class shall receive one point credit for 
each "night shirt" retained at the ex- 
piration of the contest. The "night 
shirt" shall be considered removed 
when the body of the shirt is torn off. 

11. The two classes shall line up as 
at the start of the second division 
with the sophomores forming the 
outer circle. 

12. One pistol shot shall start the 
"battle royal." In this contest two 
sophomores may carry or push one 
freshman into the sophomore "pen," 
and two freshmen may do the same 
with one sophomore. A man is con- 
sidered "dead" as soon as he enters 
either "pen" and is out of the re- 
mainder of the contest. Two points 
shall be awarded for each man cap- 
tured. This contest will be terminated 
by two pistol shots after ten minutes 
have elapsed. 

13. Two shots in rapid succession 
means someone is injured and all 
contestants must cease battling, im- 
mediately. 

14. Slugging positively prohibited. 

15. The contest will be awarded to 
the class obtaining a total majority of 
points in the three divisions. 

16. Violation of the rules will result 
in the immediate stopping and for- 
feiture of the contest. 

17. The Senate will be the judge. 



ADMINISTRATION ADOPTS NEW 
FRESHMAN ORIENTATION PLAN 



THE MASSACIIISKTTS tOI.I.Kt.lAN, Till KSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, l»3tt 






FR0SH-S0PH ROPE 
PULL ON SATURDAY 



book, ami the Collegian in the first 
ItSJtte in September. 

(b) These rules shall be posted in 
each fraternity house throughout the 
rushing season. 

(c) A brief introduction explaining 
fraternities -hall lie written by the 

ident of the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil and published in the Freshman 
Handbook, 

(d) The Dean, Or a representative 

appointed by him hall at the first as- 
sembly <>f th. freshmen clas- explain 
to the elasa there assembled the re* 
iponsibHItiea of the rushing season 
and the pledging of freshmen to a 
fraternity. 



I'KFVIKWS 

Out glorifying even the gnat im- 

presaario himself) the lavish spectacle 

centered about the life of Flore ns 
Ziegfeld will be screened early n« . I 
week at the Amherst Theater. Con- 
trary to previous announcements there 
will be no advance in price*. II its 

glamor and glider you're interested 
in, it's a hIiow worth seeing. 



The annual freshman-sophomore 
rope-pull, opening the interclass 
struggle, is to be held Saturday after- 
noon at 4 o'clock, under the direction 
of the Senate. Someone will get wet. 

The present sophomore class, thus 
far victorious, will have a difficult 
time to beat the record set by '37, 
the only dry class in recent years. As 
in the past, hitching the rope to posts, 
greasing opponents' hands, and splash- 
ing the losers are strictly barred. 



VAKSITY FOOTBALL 

Continued from Page 3 
son. The other two members of the 
center trio, Ed Bernstein and Fred 
Sievers, both guards who played as 
regulars last year, will capably assist 
Rossiter. 

Other lettermen on the squad are 
Guy Gray, Chuck Collins, Walter 
Moseley, Windy Lapham and "Babe" 
Brown. Lapham was a regular last 
year, and earned his letter two years 
ago as a sophomore. He's seen enough 
service to make him a valuable asset 
to this year's varsity eleven. Gray, a 
tackle, got his experience last season 
as an understudy to Arnie Shulkin. 
Collins, a junior, plays at center and 
is a capable replacement for Rossiter. 
Brown did well in the few times he 
saw service as a halfback, last year, 
and if he continues to show improved 
form, should win a starting berth. 
Moseley, an end, is starting his third 
season for the Statesmen. Walt is a 
basketball player and a stellar pass 
receiver who will probably be heard 
from this year. 

The backfield situation is the most 
difficult problem Coach Caraway has 
to deal with. With the graduation 
last June of Stewart, Koenig, Allen, 
and Sturtevant, plus the transfer of 
Mike Alpert, experienced backfield 
talent was virtually depleted. At 
present, hopes for capable ball-toters 
seem to rest with Sabin Filipkowski, a 
letterman who showed promise as a 
running back last season, Eddie Cze- 
lusniak, George Niden, Steve Silver- 
man, Babe Brown, Russ Hauk, Pick 
Towle, and Bill Bullock. 

In the line, George O'Brien, Bud 
Fisher, Frank Southwick, Cliff Morey, 
Norm Linden, Al Gricius, and Bill 
Roberge are all possibilities to answer 
the opening whistle against Bowdoin. 
O'Brien, Fisher, and Gricius are not 
wholly without experience, all three 
men having played somewhat in the 
previous two years. 



FKKSHMAN REGISTRATION 

Continued from Page 1 

Monk, Carolyn E. (Jroton 

Morley, Dorothy R. Amherst 

Oertel, Priscilla M. No. Hanson 

Pease, Virginia H. Amherst 

I'elissier, Helene Hadley 

Phipps, Dorothy Holliston 

Purdy, Elizabeth H. Pittsfield 
Pratt, Esther 

Reinap, Mia Waltham 

Reynolds, H. Elizabeth Worcester 

Rice, Katherine L. Springfield 

Robbins, Patricia J. Worcester 

Rourke, Dorothy J. Springfield 
Russell, Sylvia Lynnfield Centre 

Shaw, Marjorie C Melchertown 

Sherry, Myrtle R. Haverhill 

Smalley, Dorothea F. Worcester 

Smith, H. Marjorie Springfield 

Spofford, Elizabeth I.ee 

Stewart, Jacqueline I.. Amherst 

Stewart, Mary A. So. Duxbury 

Stutsman, S. Elizabeth So. Hadley 

Vannnh, Margaret V. Monson 

Taylor, Prise ilia W. Roxbury 

Webber, Helena ,). Winchendon 
Wheeler. Esther H. Dunbarton, N.H. 

Wood, Beatrice w. Upton 

HOYS 

Abramovitz, Sydney B e v e rl y 

Adelson, Arthur Chelsea 

Atwaler, C.eorgc I,. West field 

Pnrnard, Vincent J. No. Adams 

Harney, C. Henry So. Hadley 

Barlosiewicz, .1. A. Northampton 

Beagarie, Bernard .1. Greenfield 

Beanies, Geoffrey H. Woodstock, Ct. 



A new plan to make the transition 
from high school to college as easy as 
possible for freshmen has been adopted 
this year by the administration. The 
"Orientation Week" program is a 
special program designed to adjust the 
thinking of freshmen and their way of 
living to college conditions. 

After registration was completed, 
entering students listened to Prof. 
Frank Prentice Rand, historian, relate 
highlights of the history and tradi- 
tions of the College. Arrangements 
were made to have the beginners meet 
their classmates in social hours spon- 
sored by members of the faculty, and 
for a series of talks by student upper- 
class leaders introducing the beginners 
to fraternity and sorority life, social 
affairs, and student organizations. 
The usual physical examinations will 
be given all members of the class, 
mental tests will be given, photographs 
will be taken, and students will meet 
their faculty advisers. 

"Instead of making the freshman 
feel like a neophyte," said Dean 
Machmer, "we will try to direct him, 
instruct him, and educate him in 
making adjustments to conditions 
which, for the average freshman, are 
markedly different from those he has 
ever known before." 



BAND LAYS PLANS 
FOR BUSY SEASON 



This year the Band is to be organ- 
ized into two separate groups, one for 
the football season, and one for the 
concert season. This will give those 
men in athletics this fall a chance to 
participate in the activities of the 
Band this winter. As was the case 
last fall, several trips with the foot- 
ball team are planned. 

The concert activities of the Band 
this winter will consist of several 
concerts on campus and several trips. 
The climax of the concert season will 
be the May concert on the lawn in 
front of the Memorial Building. In 
these concerts various men in the 
Band will be featured as soloists, and 
several novel specialties have been 
selected for the Band as a whole. 

As usual military instruments will 
be available for those men who wish 
to join the Band, but have no instru- 
ments at school. All men who play 
band instruments and who wish to 
join the Band are urged to be at the 
Memorial Building Tuesday night. 
September 29, at 7 p.m. The regular 
rehearsal will be held Thursday at 
7.30 p.m. 

The Band is fortunate in again 
securing the services of Mr. Charles 
B. Farnum of Holyoke as coach. This 
past summer he has been on tour as 
featured trombone soloist with vari- 
ous bands in New England. In August 
he appeared on the same program as 
Walter Smith's son, Walter, Jr. 

For further information concerning 
the Band see the managers, Ralph B 
Pates '37, and Robert L. Spiller, Jr . 
'37. 



Beattie, Robert A. 
Benemelis, Robert L. 
Bennett, Charles W. 
Bernstein, Robert H. 
Beytes, Deane A. 
Blake, Richard F. 
Blasko, .John E. 
Blauer, Harris 
Bowen, Earl K. 
Boyd, Glenn D. 
Brault, Clement 
Brown, Roger W. .Ir. 
Brunner, Harold A. 
Buckley, .James B. 
Burakoff, Morris H. 
Burns, Herbert V. 

Carroll, Lao G. 

Casey, Thomas A. 
Cashman, Robert N. 
Chalfen, Melvin H. 
Chapman, Robert M. 
Clark. Ralph G. 
Cohen, Isadore 
Cole, Frederick .1. 
Cowling, Douglas 
Creswell, Robert M. 
Curran, George M. 

Dailey, Gerald 

( 'on 



Lowell 

Holyoke 

S. Hadley Fall* 

Springfield 

Plymouth 

Southvi 

Amherst 

Brooklin. 

W. SpringhVM 

Amherst 

New Bedford 

Lexington 

Webslrr 

Springfield 

Chelsea 

Gloucester 

Bridgewal' r 

Somer 

Kaslhnmpl"" 

Brooklint 

WaverK 

Enfield 

Dorchester 

Springfield 

Falrhavi n 

Won e ! 

Northampti 

Ashmoiii 
turned on Pag< ■ 



LAPHAM, DANF0RTH WINNER, 
REVIEWS SUMMER COURSE 



By Wendell E. Lapham '37 

"Hello, you nigger-lover." 

"Hi, you Texas longhorn." 

"Well, if it isn't that Utah Mormon 
: .gain." 

Such were a few of the numerous 

ee tings, and salutations given and 
received by the thirty-seven college 

udents representing thirty-six states 
id St. Louis the opening day of the 
Danforth fellowship course. As dele- 
gate from Massachusetts, I noted that 
the "damyankee" classification of New 
' nglanders was still in vogue. 

The first two weeks in St. Louis 
were very well spent studying, through 
actual experience, problems of manu- 
facturing, sales, grain exchanges, stock- 
yards, research laboratories, and farm 
experimentation management. We 
were all very fortunate in having 
personal interviews with the personnel 
director of Purina Mills, owned by the 
director of the foundation. 

The last two weeks of the fellowship 
trip were spent at Camp Miniwanka, 
an American Youth Foundation camp 
in Shelby on the shores of Lake 
Michigan. Camp is not an unusual 
experience, yet there was something 
about Camp Miniwanka that made 
it unique — morning dips in the 40 
degree water of the lake, for instance. 
The southern boys could never quite 
|et used to that. 

It's a man's paradise there, with 
hundreds of youths from all over the 
country, all engrossed in the great 
youth movement which is beginning 
to make itself felt in America. With 
none of the city's distraction, there 
was plenty of time both for study and 
sports. 

The mornings were spent in class 
periods which included discussions of 
achievement analysis, life's essentials 
and four-fold development. After- 
noons were given over to swimming, 
baseball, volleyball, soccer, tennis, 
etc. Everyone took part in all camp 
activities. Near the end of the camp 
period an athletic meet was held in 
which everyone was required to take 
part. 

Evenings were well taken up by 
inspirational meetings, night beach 
games, council circle and stunt periods. 

The entire fellowship is offered each 
year to a junior of this College. During 
recent years it has been given to an 
economics major, due to the immea- 
surable value of the fellowship to a 
young man who plans to enter the 
business field upon graduation. A 



ANNUAL FRESHMAN 
RECEPTION FRIDAY 



Outstanding upperclassmen have 
been invited to meet the freshmen at 
the faculty reception to the freshmen 
on Friday, Sept. 25 at 8 p.m. in the 
Memorial Building. For the past two 
years all upperclassmen have not been 
allowed to attend. 

The freshmen will form into line to 
meet President and Mrs. Baker, Dean 
and Mrs. Machmer, all faculty mem- 
bers, and invited students. Refresh- 
ments will be served in the lobby of 
the Memorial Building, and dancing 
will follow until 10 o'clock. 

The practice of having the leaders 
of the different religious organizations 
speak during the reception, which was 
discontinued last year, will not be 
observed this year. As was the case 
last year, a special meeting of the 
freshmen is now held for the purpose 
of acquainting them with the different 
organizations on the campus. 



great amount of competition for next 
summer's fellowship is expected, and 
details will be available at an early 
date from the Dean's office and from 
the writer. 



If, S. C. CAVALRYMEN 

Continued from Page 1 
lows who had to parade up and down 
in front of twenty-seven horses from 
two A. M. until four A. M. found 
trouble in trying to keep awake — in 
fact, one dark and dreary night 
Houghton was found sound asleep with 
his head upon his saddle. 

Monday morning and the detach- 
ment took the longest ride of the 
whole trip — to Woodstock — thirty- 
three miles away — followed by suc- 
cessive stops at Randolph, Northfield, 
Waterbury, Richmond and Fort Ethan 
Allen. 

It was feared that the ideal weath- 
er could not last long and we were 
not disappointed, for on the hike to 
Waterbury we awoke with the threat- 
ening rain. 

The Waterbury location proved to 
be some farmer's cow pasture and it 
was our bad luck to know that the 
Norwich group, also en route to the 



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Other makes $2.95 and up 

For women the latest in dress and sports 
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Bolles Shoe Store 




(S(/f//e ~M. Swifze, 



Fort, had camped there the night pre- 
vious. The fatigue detail that never- 
tiring group of diggers was busy 
working all afternoon in picking up. 

Northfield is the home of Norwich 
U. and we camped there on their polo 
field and had the use of their bathing 
facilities as well. Hot water was a rare 
treat and indeed appreciated by all. 

It was on a Saturday morning that 
we reached the Fort, having met the 
Norwich group in Jericho. We took 
impish delight in leading into camp 
before them to the tune of the 7th 
Field Artillery band. Review was 
held and we then marched over to our 
tents. 

Something to Sleep On 

At the fort, all rumors to the effect 
that the Colonel had ordered Beauty- 
rests for each of us seemed to be true 
— a luxury which we had not dared 
even hope for. After ten days on 
the ground, a night in a cot with a 
mattress was almost heart-breaking. 
As for eating at a table, we felt sure 
that we never could quite go back to 
that — but we did for it was back to 
excellent food once again and plenty 
of it. 

Arising at five each morning we 
found it necessary to keep very quiet 
lest we disturb the slumber of the 
Yale and Harvard men across the 
street who beefed because they had 
to arise at 6:30. And it was a crack 
band which would blast forth directly 
into our tents each morning to com- 
mence the day's work. 

Mornings were spent with the 
Springfields, either firing them or else 
in the pits marking targets for others. 
Red flags were frequent at first and 
indicated that the Statesman couldn't 
hit the back side of a barn door but 
as the days went by white discs dom- 
inated the horizon and black and blue 
shoulders returned to normalcy. 

The afternoons were well taken care 
of by mounted drills, which believe it 
or not, proved to be the easiest part 
of the afternoon's work. The horses 
had a way of getting filthy in the open 
corrals and all too much time was 
spent in getting them to look present- 
able. And furthermore all equipment 
had to be thoroughly cleaned after 
each drill and when we would get 
through there would be barely enough 
time to walk a mile and a half back to 
camp to get cleaned up for supper. 
And the Norwichites had a way of 
using up all of the hot water on us 
too. 

Outside the Line of Duty 

Despite solemn vows that early re- 
tirement was in order the majority 
would start off for the post theatre or 
the Van Ness in Burlington. 

Vermont U's summer school was in 
session much to the delight of a few 
and of course there were other wom- 
en in Burlington who made life worth 
while. 

Ingalls and Lapham journeyed up 
to the Lake Champlain Club one eve- 
ning and were convinced that they 
should take out memberships in the 
place, which they did. 

Bob Bieber was clever enough to 
have an orderly take care of his boots, 
etc. while at camp — and so adapt was 
Julius that the whole camp soon took 
him in. 

Davis was living a quiet and seclud- 
ed life until one day rather than walk 
the length of company street to wash 
he used his canteen filled with water 
and the college guidon. To him right- 
fully belongs the title of guidon sar- 
geant. 

Gricus and one of his cronies got 
picked up in Burlington for a Vox 
Pop program over the ether wave.- 
and suffered none the less from the 
bargain — they each received a quart 
of Veedol oil for their efforts. In the 
end, Chick Cutter got the oil. 

Boot* and Saddles for Home 

On the 8th of July once more we 
started out, now fully aware of most 
things which had perplexed us four 
weeks previous. VY< left good friend.- 
from Norwich behind us and trotted 
to Hinesburg. Surpris« | were num< r- 
0UI when it wa> found that a special 



CAPT. STEWART TAKES OVER 
DUTIES IN MILITARY DEPT. 



FIRST INFORMAL 
DANCE SATURDAY 



The Informal Committee this year 
has already announced plana for 
several dances during the fall season 
now at hand. Elaborate preparations 
are now being made for a tea dance in 
the afternoon following the Amherst 
game, as well as for a poverty dance 
sometime in December. 

The first informal will be held next 
Saturday evening in the drill hall from 
8 to 11:30. Dave Rossiter, chairman 
of the Informal Committee, haB in- 
vited Prof, and Mrs. Harold W. Smart 
and Major and Mrs. Leo B. Conner 
to serve as chaperons and Helen 
Downing's orchestra will furnish the 
music. Other members of the com- 
mittee include Phil Layton, Ken Ross 
and Russ Hauck and all are anxious 
to assure the college and members of 
the i.. -simian class in particular, that 
this first dance of the college year will 
be a successful one and one at which 
all attending will have an enjoyable 
evening of fun and romance. 



detachment from the Univ. of Ver- 
mont were following in a Connecticut 
Clevelot. 

Swimming facilities were excellent 
at Bristol, Lake Dunnore and then 
Lake Bomaseen where the weekend 
was spent. 

The following night at Welles 
looked as though the camp had been 
pitched in the middle of a breeding 
station for mosquitoes. So thick were 
they that they worked in sets of 
three — two to hold your arms and the 
third one to bite you. 

On to Manchester, to Jamaica, to 
Wilmington and to Colrain — getting 
ever closer to Amherst — and ever 
closer to the heat of Massachusetts. 

As might be expected, every one 
was getting anxious for the trip to end 
and one Saturday morning as we 
headed for Amherst from Colrain we 
beheld scenes which we left some five 
weeks previous and everyone was in 



Appointment of Captain Harold P 
Stewart to fill the vacancy left by the 
transfer of Major Herbert B, Watkina 
to Fort Ethan Allen, and the promo- 
tion of Captain Leo B. Conner to the 
rank of Major, have been announced 
by the military department. 

Captain Stewart, who arrived here 
early this month, has a daughter 
enrolled at M.S.C. 

< 'aptain Stewart 

Captain Stewart was born in Mis- 
souri in 1893 and was from there 
appointed to the army. He was made 
Second Lieutenant of Cavalry in 
October, 1917; First Lieutenant, Sep- 
tember, 1919; and Captain, August, 
1921. He served a detail in the Ord- 
nance department from 1923 to 1926. 
He was graduated from the Ordnance 
School of the Army in 1925 and from 
the Cavalry School at Fort Riley in 
1927. Upon graduation from the 
Command and General Staff School 
in June he was granted two months 
leave. 

Major Cornier 

Major Conner is a graduate of West 
Point in 1917 and of the U. S. Cavalry 
and Infantry schools. He has served 
with the 7th, 10th, 12th, and 14th 
U. S. Cavalry and was assistant pro- 
fessor of military science and tactics 
at the University of Arizona from 
1921 to 1924. Both Colonel Appling- 
ton and Major Conner have received 
four-year appointments to the college 
staff. 



high spirits. 

Horses were tied on the picket line 
and groomed for the last time. A 
quick lunch, a thorough scrubbing at 
the Phys. Ed. a turning in of duffle 
bag, clod hopper shoes, blue jumpers, 
campaign hats with orange bands and 
much beloved mess kits. 

And then the much to be desired 
government checks — for it seems that 
the first ones had long been used up 
— on the following Monday morning. 
With that gesture no one lost any time 
in leaving Amherst — the hike was 
just a thing of the past but an event 
never to be forgotten. 



WELCOME 
MEN OF STATE! 



Matinees at 2 30 
25c 




Evenings 6:30 8:30 
35c 



Fri.-Sat , Sept. 25-26 



Technicolor Special 
"DANCINCi PIRATK" 

with Steffi hiimi 



Walter Abel (iertrude Michael 



in 



A I so 



"Detective Storv" 



"SECOND WIFK" 

Stranger Than Fiction" 



3 days only Sun.-Mon.-Tues.. Sept. 27-28-29 

Intact! Complete! Exactly the same as the three-hour road show 

presentation! 

THE GREAT 
ZIEGFELD 

With William Powell. Myrna l.oy. I.iiUc Kaincr. Frank Morgan, 

Fannie Kriee, Kay Bulger 



THICK DAILY 

Matinee- all »cat» 2.V l-Scning* all -eats 3.V 



SOON: Frixl Astaire in "Swinp Ti 



me 



Anthonv Adverse" 



Clothing and 



Haberdashery 



-v - 4r- t>c ; ,* rn- 



tt 



TIIK MASSAC III SKITS COLLBtilAN, Till KSIKVY. SWTKMBKH 3B. 193B 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



WWLCOME FRKSIIMKN 

"The House of Walsh" bids you welcome especially all 
the Infant Class. Learn your lesson and visit the shop 
that's . . . More than a Toggery -A College Institution. 



DEANS LIST 

With the release of the Dean's list 
for tin- second semester of the 1935-88 
year, a total of 296 names is printed. 
In tb« first group of 90-100', ibefS are 
ten, five in the class of '37 

The second group, 85-90 r ,' contains 
ninety-five names and the third rat- 
ing. SO-S/v; contains 190 names. 

The lists art- as follows: 

CiKOlI' 1 

IfM J H. Clarke. A. H. Fisher. 
D. N. Click. S. Neuman. 

1937 Birdsall. Ferner. R. K. Pratt- 
Swansea, A. Thomas. 

1939 Miller. 

CiKOl 1' II 

1936- Barrow*, Bixb> 

ley. Brneckner, Miss 



Brad* 

Miss 



, Mi* 

Brum 

Bullard. Miss Chase. Miss Cznjkowski. 
Miss Driscoll, Forer. Foster, Frye. 
Glazier, GUckstein, Coldman. Miss 
Hager, Miss Horrigan. Lavin. T. Lord. 
Miss Low. Miss Macintosh, Miss 
Mallory. Miss Nurmi, Miss Paulding, 
R. T. Peckham, L. C. Peterson. H. D. 
Pratt. R. Proctor. Miss Rafter, A. 
Richards. Shulkin. Sjogren. Miss F. 
Smith, Tanner. Miss Vickery. Wainio. 
Whaley, Miss Winsor. Wood. 

j937 J. F. Appel. Herman. Rem, 

Brooks, Butler. Chandler, Ciosek, 
Miss B. R. Clark. Ferrucci. Miss Gala, 
Hanson. Holdworth. Irvine, Miss Keck, 
Klihanoff. Lipman, Milne. Miss Mon- 
roe Moss. Nogelo, Nowakowski. R. B. 

Peckham. L. W. Rice. P. L. Richards. 

Ryer. San Clemente, M. Silverman. 
Sleeper. Miss Stepath. Swan. Talinski, 

Widlansky. Williams. 

193> Bergman, Miss Bloom, Miss 

E Brown. Caruso. Miss Crowell. 

EuODOUlas, Miss Fahey. Cage. Miss 

Hadro. Miss Kinsman. Klayman. 

Lindstrom. Miss Shaw. Slesinski. 

191J Auerhach. Bischoff, Miss 

Booth. Brody. Carp, Cordon. Mi>s 

Herman, White, Wintman. 

(iKOlT HI 

|93t R. T. Adams. Miss Allis. 
M,,< Andrus, Arenherg. Bahcock, 
Balavich. Ballou. M. Bernstein, Miss 
Bilskv. Boylan. R. 8. Bray. Brennan. 
Bull. Clapp, R. B. Clark, Miss Cooney, 
Mi.-s Crahtree. Crowe, deWilde, Dim- 
ock. Donnelly. Miss Dow. Dunker. 
Gardner. W. R. Gillette. Glynn, C.od- 
dard. Hale. Hannum. Miss Hopkins. 
Miss Horgan. D. Johnson. Kennett. 
Miss Kingston. Miss Kleyla. Klick- 
stein. Koemg. Krtil. LeDuc. Miss 
Inquire. Levine. Miss Lincoln. R. 
Lincoln. Lipovsky. Lolhrop. Miss 
Luhach. Miss Masters. Mil liaslsntl, 



Monroe, K. R. Newman. Norwood, 
Miss O'Brien, Packard, Parker, Miss 
Proctor. Riley, Miss Saulni r, Snow, 
Miss Stratton, Sturtevant, Sweinber- 
ger, Thayer, Wolcott, Miss Ziomek. 

1937 Miss Ash. Barr, K. Bernstein, 
Miss Blassherg, Bobula, Bohm, Bolton, 
Bristol, Miss M. E. Cain, Miss Cal- 
kins, L. F. Clark. M. I. Cohen, Des- 
mond. Miss Donnelly, Entin, Miss 
Filios. A. W. Fisher, .1. Freedman, 
Gates, George, Miss Goldsmith, Good- 
hue, Miss Jackson, Kewer, Kushlan, 
Miss D. Lannon, Liberfarb, Ludwin, 
Miss Nice, Planting, Miss Priest . 
Richason, Ruffley, Ryan, Simonsen, 
Thorndike, Tubiash. Witney, Wyman, 
Zukel. 

193S Allaire, Miss E. Barton, R. 
W. Barton. D. W. Beaumont, H. L. 
Belgrade. Miss Bixby, Bode, Miss 
Boron, Buzzee. Miss C. E. Carpenter, 
N. Clark. W. J. Collins, Coutu, Miss 
Ourtin. Davidson, C. G. Edson, Farns- 
worth, Finkel Forbush, French, Golub, 
Gruner, Heller, E. Higgins. Judd, Miss 
C. Julian. Kelley, Miss Kenyon, Miss 
Kingsbury, Miss Kodis, Lee, Miss 
Mann, Miss Milkey. Mish, Nolan, 
Miss O'Connell, Osley, Miss Parker, 
Putnam, Rosenbloom, Rozwenc, Miss 
Seal, Sherman, D. L. Silverman, S. I. 
Silverman, Slocomb, Snyder, Miss 
Streeter, Tannenbaum, Wheeler. 

1939- Barrett, Bettoney, I. Blass- 
herg, C. W. Cassidy, W. E. Cassidy. 
Christie, Ciereszko, Miss Clapp, Miss 
Copeland, Decker, Degraff. Elliott, 
Fisher, Miss Fortin, A. E. Freedman, 
Glow, D. Goldberg, Gove, Healey, 
W. Howe, Kaplan, Kaplinsky. Levin, 
Mendall, Meurer, Moore, Miss Nich- 
ols, Miss Olson, Miss Richmond, 
Roberts, Sedoff, Steinberg. N. T. 
Thomas, Turner, Vittum. 



Foster, Willard O. Jr. 
Fram, Harvey 
Fram, Paul 
Freeman, Lawrence J. 
Geoffrion, Philip 
Glashow, Arnold I. 
Gillmore, Vern W. 
Gleason, Charles L. Jr. 
Glendon, Richard R. 
Goodrich, Carl A. Jr. 
Goodwin, William F. 



Marion 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Southbridge 

W. Springfield 

Roxbury 

Gilbertville 

Hanover 

Winchester 

Holyoke 

Winthrop 



Gregg, Burton W. Westminster, Vt 



Griffin, Harold E. Jr. 
Hagelstein, Arthur H. 
Hager, Myron D. 
Hall, John W. 
Hall, Robert E. C. 
Hanley, Robert H. 
Harding, Malcolm B. Jr. 



Dorchester 

Stoughton 

S. Deerfield 

Marshfield 

Upton 

Hopedale 

Westfield 



Hennessy, David E. 
Herrick, T. Waldo Jr. 
Hill, Ralph B. 
Hopkins, Franklin 
Hitchcock, Stanley H. 
Howe, Arthur F. 
Hoxie, Howard M. 
Hughes, Frederick K. 
Ingham, John S. 
Jakubek, John C. 
Johnson, Louis F. Jr. 
Jones, Robert 
Jaquith, Richard H. 
Joseph, Richard P. 
Joyce, Robert A. 

Kelfer, Albert I. 

Kelso, John H. 

Keville, Francis B. 

Kennedy, Robert C. 

King, James H. Jr. 

Kokins, Carl E. 

Krauss, Herbert 



FRESHMEN CLASS 

Continued from Page 4 
Daley. Frank R. L. Jr. 



Dalton, Frank H 
Davenport, G. G. Jr. 
Davis, Franklin M. Jr. 
Deneault, Emile E. Jr. 
Dereg, Edmond 
Dingman, Robert O. 
Downs, Currie H. 
Ducy, Robert A. 

Dunn, Robert 

Eaton. Robert B. 

Filios, John E. 

Finik, Stanley 

Flanagan, George F. 

Fleming, Urban C. 

Foley, Robert T 

Foley. William G. 



Holyoke 
Greenfield 
Hopedale 
Waltham 
Greenfield 
Holyoke 
Palmer 
E. Lynn 
Thorndike 
Pittsfield 
Waltham 
Westfield 
S. Hadley Falls 
Easthampton 
Holyoke 
Turners Falls 
Salem 



Langworthy. Everett W. 
Lanson, Raino K. 
Lavrakas, Vasilis 
Larkin, Joseph P. 
Lepine, Arthur J. 
Levine, Robert H. 
Levitch, Gerald J. 
Levy, Sumner C. 
Lindsay, Roger H. 
Lipshires, Sidney S. 
Mahoney, Donald J. 

Malins, Dana H. 

Mango, John J. J. 

Mansfield, Charles F. 

Marcus, David M. 

Martin, Robert A. 

McAndrew, Gerald 

McCarthy, John J. 

McCartney, Robert J. 

McLaughlin, Charles L. 

Merrill, John E. 

Meunier, Roland G. 

Miller, John C. 

Miller, Norman D. 

Morgan, Roger W. 

Morris, Herbert I. 
Morse, Roy 



Moseley, Maynard F. 
Mosher, Robert H. 
Muller, Richard K. 
Neznayko, Michael 
Nictupski, Dominic E. 
Norwood, Lewis F. Jr. 
Novelli, G. David 
Noyes, Arthur A. 
Nutting, William B. 
O'Connell, D. J. Jr. S 
O'Neill, John R. 
Oppenheim, Edward 
Osmun, John V. 
Palumbo, Ralph F. 
Paul, Christopher 
Payson, James W. Jr. 
Pearlman, Martin Jr. 
Phillips, Lester 
Pike, Kenneth V. 
! Pitts, George 
Plichta, Richard 
Podolak, Edwin 
Powers, Charles A. Jr. 
Powers, John J. Jr. 
Prouty, L. Fletcher, Jr 
Reagan, Lawrence H. 
Reisman, Melvin 
Rice, Leonard I. 
Robbins, Shirley 
Richards, W. H. Jr. 
Rodman, Robert 
Roffinoli, Rino J. 
Rojko, Anthony 
Rosen, Sidney W. 
Ross, Walter A. Jr. 
Rossman, Edwin M. 
Rubinwitch, Walter R. 
Rudge, Alfred 
Ryan, Winslow E. 
Saltzman, Theodore 
Sanderson, James J. 
Saunders, Francis R. 
Santucci. Leo J. 
Sawyer, David 
Scholz, Evi C. 
Scannell. Flourence P. 
Schoonmaker, Norman J 
Schreiber, Henry M. 
Searle, David H. 
Serex, John P. 
Shaw, Donald H. 
Shaw, Samuel P. 
Shapiro, Everett 
Sheldon, Robert I. 
Shepardson, Daniel E. 
Sherman, Arthur 
Shepardson, Wilfred B. 
Sichol, Myron H. 
Silberberg, Bernard 
Slack, Tracy B. 
Slater, Edgar 
Smith, Alan C. 
Springfield I Smith, Carlton V. 

Charlton Smith. John Jr. 
Springfield Smith, Frank B. 

Medford Spencer, Everett R. Jr 
Dorchester Spencer, Frank H. 
S. Bvefield Spungin, Benjamin 



Allston j Spungin, Sidney 
Holyoke . Stahlberg, Eric, Jr 
Amherst ! Staples, Robert 



Cherry Valley 
S. Duxbury 
Ipswich 
Leverett 
Gilbertville 
Brockton 
Northampton 
Holyoke 
Ludlow 
Hadley 
Gloucester 
Princeton 
Northampton 
N. Truro 
Florence 
Winthrop 
Chester 
E. Lynn 
N. Dartmouth 
Worcester 
Ashland 
Great Barrington 



Amherst ■ 
N. Wilbrahaml 
Rockport ! 
N. Agawam 
Waban 
W. Boylston 
5. Hadley Falls 
Holyoke 
Brockton 
Amherst 
Leominster 
Dorchester 
Millis 
Brookline 
Pittsfield 
Pittsfield 
Beverly 
Amherst 
Hadley 
Braintree 
Pittsfield 
Springfield 
Dorchester 
Brighton 
Winthrop 
Lexington 
Northampton 
Dorchester 
Williamstown 
Hadley 
Lynn 
W. Springfield 
Allston 
Springfield 



Storey, Harold F. 
Stranger, Homer L 
Straube, Harold L. 
Sullivan, Albert 
Swenson, John W. 
Tappin, Warren R. Jr. 
Taylor, Roy C. 
Terry, Dean T. 
| Thornton, Henry S. 
j Tiberii, Chester 
Tobey, George B. 
Tolnick, Bernard 

Trees, Malcolm P. 

Tuttle, Matthew N. 

Twible, Carlton W. 

Vigue, George D. 

Washburn, A. W. Jr. 

Watson, Frederick J. 

Wetherell, Howard D. 

Wilansky, Nathan L. 

Wiieikes, Walter A. 

Williams, Robert 

Winchester, George A. 

Winer, Nathan 

Willson, Harold Jr. 

Wing, Francis 

Winter, Wilfred M. 

Wolfe, John F. 

Woodbury, Edgar H. Jr. 

Woytisek, Richard W. 

Wright, Fred L. Jr. 

Wyman, Wallace W. 

Zabierek, Julian 

Zelbovitz, Myer S. 
Zuckerman, Sidney 



Chester 
Worcester 
Watertown 
Watertown 
Holyoke 
Roxbury j 
Greenfield 
Cambridge 
Ware 
Northampton 
Holyoke 
Brighton 
W. Upton 
Taunton 
Roxbury 
Fittsfield 
Barre 
Worcester 
Salem 
Amherst 
Southbridge 



Greenfield 
Northampton 
Northampton 
Millis 
Kingston 
Bloomfield, N.J. 
S. Hadley Falls 
Worcester 
Winchendon 
Greenfield 
Palmer 
Amherst 
Charlton 
Framingham 
Roxbury 
Maynard 
Lynn 
Gilbertville 
Framingham 
Attleboro 
Jamaica Plain 
Westfield 
Holyoke 
N. Amhersi 
Milford 
Worcester 
Three Rivers 
W. Harwich 
Sandwich 
Wrentham 
Winchester 
Littleton 
Westfield 
Brockton 
Westfield 
Chelmsford 
Chelsea 
Pittsfield 



Hudson 
Roxbury 
Washington 
Gloucester 
Palmer 
Dorchester 
State Line 
Greenfield 
Amherst 
Winthrop 
Housatonic 
Amherst 
Belmont 
Middleboro 
Mattapan 
W. Springfield 
Athol 
Lanes boro 
Winthrop 
Holland 
Dorchester 
Charlemont 
Tyringham 
W. Newton 
N. Brookfield 
Southwick 
Holyoke 
Holyoke 
Northampton 
Springfield 



New Styles, Shapes and 

Colors in 

STATIONERY 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



COLLEGE 
CANDY KITCHEN 

Always Reliable 
Best Food Best Soda 

Fountain Refreshments 
Pastry Candy Nuts 

Prices reasonable 

Excellent Service 
SAKRIS RESTAURANT 



ial Board Com 
Massachusetts 



Positions are open on the Editorial Board of the Massachusetts 
Collegian for Freshmen and Sophomores. All applicants should 
register at 7:30 p.m. or get in touch with the editor at Lambda 
Chi Alpha before that time. The Collegian Board would be 
very pleased if there were a good secretary among the applicants. 



\ 



CURRENT 
EVENT 

M. S. C. 

VH. 
Itowiloill 




Mpn 



Ot 


TSTAND1NG 




EVENT 




Record 


K 


iirollmeiit 



Vol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THUBSDAY. OCTOBER 1, 193« 



No. 2 



First Caraway Team 
Faces Bowdoin Squad 



LEADS TEAM 



Game Looms as Acid Test RQSS H£ADS 
For Inexperienced Grid- 
men; Potential Strength 
Evident. 



All pre-season uncertainty and pre- 
season predictions from sideline men- 
tors will end next Saturday afternoon 
whin the first Caraway coached foot- 
ball team takes the field against a 
favored Bowdoin team in Brunswick. 

Both teams are more or less un- 
known quantities since the game on 
Saturday will be the curtain raiser 
for the Walsh team as well as for the 
Caraway men. However, last year the 
team which later copped the Maine 
State title, edged a 7-6 victory over 
the State team in our first home game 

last fall. 

Although neither team has as yet 

played a game, both elevens will be 

( handicapped next Saturday afternoon 

by pre-seaBon injuries. Bowdoin will 

Continued on Page 3 



R.O.T.C. BALL 
COMMITTEE 



Dance Will Be Held Early 
In December 



TL'KMft. 



7::tO P.M. 



MEMOR1 AL II ALL 



I CONCERT DRIVE 
STARTS MONDAY 

The annual campaign for member- 
ships in the Amherst Community 
1 Concerts Association is to be conducted 
next week, October 5th through Oc- 
tober 10th. Memberships will be sold 
during that time by a committee 
under the direction of Mrs. John L 
| Rogers. 

I -.nil Rati* 
Memberships are to be sold at the 
I usual rates and entitle the member to 
[attend all the concerts of the Amherst 
I series as well as those in all other 
|cities operating under the same plan. 
This year, because of a change in 
1 1 . .I.ral law, it will not be necessary 
Ifor the Association to pay the 10, 
lamuscment tax which has been levied 
]in past years, so that all money collec- 
ted in the campaign will be spent 
|directly for concerts. 

Sp nildiiiu. Smiromii to Appear 

Two of the attractions to be pre- 

ented this season are Albert Spaulding 

[famous American violinist, and Jesus 

■Maria Sanroma, pianist, whose work 

Ivsith the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

irned him a wide reputation in 

|the Hast. The remaining attractions 

Continued on Page 6 



Mtholic Editor 
At Next Vespers 



M issachusetts State students will 
I the Opportunity Of hearing 

e] Williams, editor of the Com- 
al, speak on the topic "The 
'ith.,lic Church and the World 
f at the Vespers service to he 

I " led in the Memorial Building 

i Sunday at 6 p.m. Mr, Williams is 
rt from Protestantism to 
icifltn, 

Vespers ser\ ices promise to 
i I liHffe audiences because ol (he 

caliber of the upeakers they erUI 
to the campus Among the 

'•I speakers are: Kirllev F. 
Jamei T, CleUind, and Arthur 
"■solving. 



Cadet Sergeant Kenwood Roes '37 
was elected chairman of the Military 
Ball committee at a meeting of all 
military majors Wednesday morning. 

Other senior members elected were 
Cadet Sergeant Robert Couhig, Cadet 
Sergeant Leroy Clark, Cadet Sergeant 
Wendell Lapham, and Cadet Sergeant 
Louis Breault. Cadet Robert Lyons 
is the junior member. 

The Military Ball is an annual 
formal dance sponsored by the student 
R.O.T.C. officers at the college. As 
usual the dance will come early in 
December. It is the only formal of the 
fall season. No ruling against corsages 
will be made, the committee has an- 
nounced. 




Registration Exceeds 
All Previous Records 



EIGHT MORE 
MEN ADDED 
TO FACULTY 



Author Here on 
Scholarship Day 

Rollo Walter Brown, eminent auth- 
or, professor and lecturer, will address 
the scholarship day convocation, Oct. 
8 on the subject, "The Romance of 
Being a Student." In keeping with 
the tradition of previous years, the 
exercises will include an academic pro- 
cession, and a recognition of the 
scholastic and oratorical accomplish- 
ments of the last semester. 

Mr. Brown was born in Ohio, and 

was educated in the middle west and 

New England. He was formerly a 

professor at Carleton College, but he 

Continued on Page 5 



Dave Rossiter '37 

Captain of the first Caraway-coached 

State football team 



PHI LAMBDA TAU, 
ALPHA LAMBDA MU, 
HAVE HIGH HONORS 



Dr. Redman Takes Over 
Parrott's Classes 



For the fourth consecutive semester 
Phi Lambda Tau heads the fraternity 
and sorority scholarship list with 
80.41, according to recent announce- 
ment from the registrar's office. 

For the first semester of 1934-35 
Phi Lambda Tau led the list with an 
average of 78.66, followed by Kappa 
Sigma and Kappa Epsilon. The 
sororities were headed by Alpha 
Lambda Mu, Lambda Delta Mu, and 
Sigma Iota. 

During the second semester of that 
year, the list was again headed by 
Phi Lambda Tau. Kappa Epsilon 
and Alpha Epsilon Pi came next in 
order. 

The first semester of last year saw 
Phi Lambda Tau again at the head of 
the list with an average of 79.85, with 
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Kappa Sitrma 
running second and third respectively. 

The complete list of averages for 
Continued on Page 5 



The names of eight new members of 
the college staff have been announced. 

William H. Lacham, Jr.. who has 
been appointed instructor in olericul- 
ture, is a graduate of Pennsylvania 
State College and received his M.S. 
degree there this spring. 

Bryan C. Redmon has been ap- 
pointed instructor in chemistry to 
replace Mr. Parrott. 

John D. Swenson, the new instructor 
in mathematics, has been graduated 
from New York University of Engin- 
eering and received his M.A. in edu- 
cation from Columbia Teachers Col- 
lege in 1936. 

Gilbert L. Woodside, who is to be 
Continued on Page 5 



Total Enrollment Is Eight 
Above Former Record; 
Statistics Show Decrease 
In Women. 



Registration this year in the four- 
year undergraduate course shows an 
increase of eight students over regis- 
tration for last year. With registration 
practically complete, the enrollment of 
1077 students for this year tops the 
1069 of last year for an all-time high. 

Fewer Woinrii 
As shown in the table below, how- 
ever, the number of women students 
is ten fewer this year than last, total- 
ling only 290. The enrollment of men 
students shows an increase of 18 over 
last year, totalling 787. The enroll- 
ment by classes remains relatively the 
same; the freshman class this year is 
slightly smaller than last, while the 
present junior class is larger by 19 
students than its predecessor. 

Enrollment 1936-37 



38 Report for 
Editorial Staff 



Thirty-eight students entered the 
fall competition for positions on the 
editorial staff of the Collegian at the 
first meeting last Tuesday. 

Thirty-four of the candidates are 
from the freshman class, and six from 
the sophomore. Active competition 
will begin this week. 

Fall competition for positions on the 
business staff is announced in this 
week's Collegian. 

Freshmen entering the editorial 
board competition are: 

Esther Wheeler, Melvin Chalfen. 
Continued on Page 5 



1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
Specials 



Men 
163 
188 
202 
232 
2 



Women 
60 
70 
72 
87 
1 



1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
Specials 



787 290 
Enrollment 1935-36 

153 68 
63 



176 

198 

239 

3 

769 



78 



300 



Total 
223 
258 
274 
319 
3 

1077 

221 
239 
276 
828 

5 

1069 



Japanese Schoolboy Attempts to Find the Orient 
In Orientation Week at M.S.C., hut All Is Confusion 



Japanese Schoolboy are been away 
from home-land now for toetal ot 
three years, so when it are seen in 
papers that college are to have 
"Orientation Week," think to self. 
"Very good, go home." 

Bright and erly of Monday Japan- 
ese Schoolboy arrive on campus 
dressed in very cerimonial costume of 
forefathers. Think to self that best 
place to go is administration offlcs to 
find out BS are said in America, "the 
score." Arrive in office, see Miss 
Cook. Now think everything alrite; 
get to Orient by Cook's Tour. 

Wish to join Orientation Week," 
Japanese Schoolboy aver, 

"Have registered/ 1 Miss Cook pro 

pound. 

"No, would like ticket first." 

MiSS CoOR ire give what sou sa\. 
"Fish cake stare" and suggest Japan 

ess Schoolboy go to Regis trator) 

office. All very confusing. 

In (lie Lineup 

Outside are hi^ line. Japanese 
Schoolboy wait for three I hour-. 
Finally sign name on one side only, 



get card which say "Return in one 
week." Also say German, English. 
History, Chemistry and other coun- 
tries of which are never heard. 

Stay in line, go into other office, 
where may say, "One hundred and 
thirty-two dollars and fifty-five cents." 
Cheep trip to Orient, think. Pay 
money, are given two (2) red ticket. 
Hound trip, think. 

For long time nothing happen. 
Look on program, find it are four i4i 
o'clock until something are done. At 
4 o'clock go to big hall where are all 
people. Man get up. May "Welcome." 
and lot of stuff. Other man say 
Mass.-u -hewsetts college are have his- 
tory and tradition, tell stories, laugh. 
All very confusing. 

Nijiht Work 

At night go to something called 

Rushing." Now .Japanese SchoolbO) 

are not one who like to be tooled. 

Find Hushing are not Soviet I'nion at 

all. ju^t lot ol people shake hands, say 

"We arc leaders oi fraternities, dues 

are only so much," and all stuff like 

thai. Japanese Schoolboy get tired. 



"Can tell me when boat are sailing 
to Orient," ask. 

Fish cake stare again. Then laugh. 
"He are card," they say, shake hands 
again. Another thing are very con- 
fusing are people call Japanese School- 
boy "Frenshman" or something of 
sort. Repeat are Japanese by birth 
until orange in face, but no good. 

Week are all like that. People talk, 
shake hands, take pictures, ask foolish 
questions. No one tell when boat is 
leave, Saturday arrive, and talk all 
time of rope pull. Decide to see. Oct 

out on campus and are loi of people. 
Coin are tired and see men on both 
sides of pond try to break rope Very 
foolish. 

"Have not got knife," ask ot man 
standing. 

"Sure, here." he are mumble, not 
giving glance. He are hold out knife. 

No (in Btt 

Japanese Schoolboy take kniie. 
think to make great hero by cutting 
rope, show brains. ("limb through 
ropes, get hold ol big rope, then try 

Continued on Page 5 



The Stockbridge School of Agricul- 
ture opens its eighteenth year of in- 
struction on October 5 with one of the 
largest enrollments in its history. 

According to announcement from 
the Registrar's office, 168 freshmen 
and 110 seniors are expected OH cam- 
pus when the fall term In-gins next 
Monday. The class of S'37 will in- 
clude three women students, and the 
class of S'38 twelve women students. 

Freshmen registration will com- 
mence on Monday at the Short Course 
office in South College The seniors 
are expected to arrive in Amherst on 
Tuesday, and will register in the 
Short ('Miirse office also. 



JUDGING TEAM 

AT EXPOSITION 

Placing first out of ten teams in 
judging Ayrshires. the Massachusetts 
State College dairy cattle judging 
teaflB won high honors at the Eastern 
States Exposition in Springfield last 
eJeek lh' geasral livestock fudging 
!■ un piaffed fourth out of six compet- 
ing teams 

The dairy cattle team was com 
posed o| H .1. Fit/p.unck. D. W 

Kingsbury, and W, B Aveey, ail of 

l he junior class, and » is > >aohed by 
Mr H (' Foley In placing first in 
the Ayrshire class thej scored 

points out of t possibli t>(Xl 1 i! ' 

patrick eras high man %<t 

,»nt< in judging Ayrshires end sixth 

high in all breeds Kingsbury wis 

fourth in AyrabJres. ami Averv was 

,i\th in plain Jersey* The team was 
fourth in all breeds 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. OCTOHER 1. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBKR 1, 1930 



/Ifoassacbuee 




Collegian 




Official newspaper of the Massachusetts" State College. Publi«hed erery Thursday by the st udents. 

LOUIS A. BREAULT '37 Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK "37, Associate Editor 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Campus Athletics 

PHILIP B SHIFF '37 JULIAN H. KATZEFF '38, Editor 

RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 

JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 ALFRED M. SWIREN '3S 

STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 THOMAS J. ENRIGHT '39 

MARY P. O CONNELL '38 Stockbrldfle Correspondents 

MAURICE TONKIN '38 RALPH HARRIS S':',7 

ROBERTA D. WALKEY '38 GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 

MARY T. MEEHAN '39 Financial Ad »U.er 

EMERY MOORE '39 PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

ELEANOR WARD 39 Faculty Ad»lser 

Make-up Editor DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 

RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37 

BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37, Business Manager 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37, Circulation Mgr. 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38, Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

MITCHE LL F. NEJA ME '38 DONALD L. SILVE RMAN '38 

SUBSCRIPTIONS t2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



The Nobel prize for sarcasm goes to 
a Lehigh student. At a dance he was 
heard to remark to a fraternity 
brother: "Will you please tell my girl 
and her escort that I'm waiting?" 



The Southern father was introduc- 
ing his family of boys to a visiting 
Governor. 

"Seventeen boys," exclaimed the 
Governor. "And all Democrats, I 
suppose." 

"All but one," said the father 

proudly. "They're all Democrats but 

John, the little rascal. He got to 

readin'." 

— Drexerd 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



W •*» all «rders *«y*bfc t« Thi MMikusiUi Co0#f«««. In case ol change of address, subscriber 
•111 please notify the business manager as soon as possible Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
tributions are sincerely encouraged. Any communications or notices must be received at the CoUitwn 

ssTce before 9 o'clock. Monday evenin g. _ 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In Section 1103 
Act of October 1917, authorised August 20 

1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press, 82 North 
Street, Northampton. Mess.. Telephone 554 



1935 Member t93^ 
Pbsocided GoUeftide Press 

Distributor of 

0oHe6iate Di6est 



I I 114 I I VI 

MATCH OUT FRESHMEN 

Next Sunday night, freshmen men, most of you will be invited 
to join a fraternity. Don't for a moment think that the accept- 
ance or decline of fraternity offers is not, for you, a serious business. 

The acceptance of a bid and the consequent joining of a fra- 
ternity means that you have taken the big step of choosing your 
friends and housemates for the next four years, that you have 
definitely planned an association with a group already recognized 
for various characteristics. After next Monday, people will begin 
looking at you and calling to mind the house that you have 
pledged. So watch out before you put on a pin. 

Fraternities have been on their best behavior the past two 
weeks, you know. Some of them have gone even further and have 
been putting on a show purely to attract you. Some of them have 
stretched interfraternity rulings almost to the breaking point for 
the sole purpose of luring you. 

Watch out for the actors; they are not sincere. Watch out 
for the braggarts; they are covering up their otherwise notice- 
able faults. Watch out for the confidence men; they think they 
have you in their clutches and they want you to admit they have. 

It should be easy for you to pick out the fraternity men who 
are treating you squarely and who are not allowing their zeal for 
new faces in their fraternity role to carry them to undue heights. 
Fraternity rushing is not a circus and you will be classed as a 
performer if you associate yourself with a group having a Barnum 
complex. 

You will be much wiser if you enter into the group with which 
you feel most at home. If you decide to enter a group you will 
find that much of the enjoyment of your years at the college will 
be a direct result of your association. So watch. 



A rather elderly lady, while walking 
down the street, sights a small child, 
of the poor white trash variety, 
dressed very shabbily and distinctly 
suggestive of the moronic type. 

Feeling some compassion for the 
youngster, the lady asks, "Young man, 
haven't you a father?" 

"Nope, no father." 

"Hum, haven't you a mother?" 

"Nope, no mother." 

"Then, haven't you any brothers or 
sisters?" 

"Oh yes, I've got a brother. He's 
up at Harvard Medical School." 

Slightly shocked, "You mean you 
have a brother, and he let's you go 
around looking like this. Doesn't he 
help you any? What's he doing there?" 

"Oh him, he's up there in a bottle 
of alcohol,- two heads." 



Thursday. Oct. 1 

7.30 p.m. Band, Memorial Hall 
Friday. Oct. 2 

7 p.m. Interfraternity Council 
Saturday, Oct. 3 

2 p.m. Football, Bowdoin, there 

8 p.m. Alpha Gamma Rho 
Sunday, Oct. 4 

5 p.m. Vespers, Dr. Michael 
Williams, editor of Common- 
weal, Memorial Building 
Monday, Oct. 5 

First semester begins for Stock- 
bridge freshmen 
Tuesday, Oct. 6 

First semester begins for Stock- 
bridge seniors 
Thursday, Oct. 8 

11 a.m. Convocation, Scholar- 
ship Day 
7.30 p.m. Band, Memorial Hall 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN does 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opinions 
voiced in this column. Communications need 
not be signed, but the identity of the writer 
must be known to the editor-in-chief. 



Announcements 



AH frc*dimen will meet on 
Saturday morning at 7.15 
a. m. in Bowkcr Auditorium 
and will receive fraternity 
date cards at that time. 



EVERY YEAR 

Adelphia held a bonfire a few evenings ago. Not enough people 
attended the affair to make it even mildly interesting which 
occasions, of course, the annual howl about college spirit. 

It has been increasingly noticeable since our coming to college 
that the simple outburst of healthy emotion required by college 
spirit has been inhibited, and for no better reason, we believe 
than an apathetic and detached attitude on the part of the stud- 
ents. We don't mean that students should weep tears every time 
they hear the name of Massachusetts State mentioned, nor do we 
wish them to conduct revival meetings on the top of Stockbridge 
Hall proving their desire to do or die to the rest of the Connecti- 
cut Valley. 

But we do mean this: There will be football games here this 
fall, not many of them, we admit, but that's another story. There 
will be soccer games, cross-country meets, and, later on, other 
athletic contests. You are here as students, presumably because 
you like the place and the least you can do is let yourselves go a 
bit and show the boys on the field that you wish you were out 
there with them. Besides, the Amherst air is a good medium in 
which to exercise the lungs. 



Flunk 

They tell of a college student who 
was taking a course in modern writing. 
Just before going to class one morning 
the youth suddenly remembered that 
the students had been ordered to pre- 
pare an article for that day. 

With no time to write something of 
his own, the youth grabbed a copy of 
the American Mercury and copied, 
word for word, some of the writings of 
H. L. Mencken. He handed the paper 
in. And the following morning it 
came back with a marking of 100?. 

The boy was completely surprised. 
He hadn't even been suspected. So 
when the nsxt test came along he em- 
ployed the same trick. He copied an 
article by George Jean Nathan and 
handed it in under his own name. 
That, too, came back with marking 
of 100?. 

The youth was now supremely confi- 
dent. This was a cinch, and it was 
obvious that the professor knew noth- 
ing about anything. He grew still 
bolder. In fact he grew too bold. 
When the third and final test came 
along he copied one of Mark Hellinger's 
alleged articles. Hellinger's copy came 
back with a marking of 60 r ;, which 
meant that it had just passed. 

The student decided to brazen this 
thing out. So he walked up to the 
professor as soon as class was over. 

"I can't understand this marking," 
he stated. "You give me a perfect 
rating on my first two articles and. 



Correction 

Through an oversight the name 
of William G. O'Donnell '39 was 
omitted from the first honor group 
of the Dean's List which was pub- 
lished last Thursday. 



Harold Bauer Recital 

The Social Union program featuring 
Harold Bauer, pianist, scheduled for 
October 19 on the campus calendar, 
will be presented Friday, November 6, 

at 8 p.m. 

Continued on Page 5 



on my third, you just pass me. Why 
is that?" 

The professor looked very tired. 

"You're lucky," he sighed. "I don't 
mind giving Mencken 100?, and cer- 
tainly don't mind giving Nathan 100','. 
But I'll be damned if I even wanted 
to pass Hellinger!" 



WHAT'S THE USE? 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

There is one question which is cor. 
stantly on the minds of undergradu- 
ates and it is "Are student activiti< - 
worthwhile?" Like so many other 
problems, this is one that can be] 
settled by experience alone. 

I must believe that the student who 
ties himself to his work and who- 
avoids any form of campus activity 
losing an opportunity that will never 
be given again. Student activities call 
for a wide association with men. Suchj 
associations will help any student tol 
be more successful in after life 
meeting his fellow men. 

Motives 

It is rather interesting to see tlie| 
underlying motives which lead stud- 
ents into campus activities. These 
motives are multitudinous: the desire I 
for honor, a liking of the work, the] 
desire for glory, the love of notoriety, 
and the will to create, to master, and| 
to do something worthwhile. 

And it is this last motive which im- 
presses me. The greatest joy any man; 
can have is in his work well done and; 
the joy of the creator is the most! 
self-satisfying of all. The student whoj 
enters any activity and does his work ■ 
faithfully is twice blest. He has served! 
his fellows in accomplishing the workj 
which they intrusted to him, and he 
has satisfied his ego in the thought of J 
work well done, of obstacles overcome, 
and a work of art created. 

Too Few Participate 

Far too small a proportion partici- 
pate in extra-curricular activities,; 
Those who are the most inactive ad- 
vance forth the explanation that these' 
activities belong to the aristocracy. 
But on the contrary, there is ample 
opportunity to participate available 
the trouble is that people do not] 
bother to interest themselves. It isn't 
that they will not be received by the 
different organizations on the campus 
Some have expressed the fear but it 
can quickly be disspelled. 

Some day students will realize that 
Continued on Page 5 



Poem of the Month 

This space will be reserved once each month for that 
selection of original verse adjudged by some member of 
the faculty as the best of the manuscripts submitted by 
students for the contest. 

Manuscripts for the November contest must be in Pro- 
fessor Rand's office not later than the 15th of that month. 

At the end of the year two prizes of $15.00 and $10.00 
respectively will be awarded for the two poems adjudged 
best and second-best of all the poems which are printed 
during the year. 



DAME Ml SIC 

More and better music is the prospect for Massachusetts 
State this year. Student organizations report a much greater 
interest in things musical than has been the usual fortune for this 
institution. The band, glee clubs, and orchestra have drawn a 
large number of prospective participators and on the face of this 
fact have planned the most ambitious program we have seen at 
this college. 

Although final programs have not as yet been released, we 
may expect a much finer band, a more extensive glee club sched- 
ule which may include a more lengthy operetta than last year. 
Also with the formation of a newly-organized musical committee, 
we may be assured of better preparation and organization in 
things musical. 

It's all within the past two or three years, too, that Massa- 
chusetts State really took a musical lease on life. 



FRESHMEN: 



All candidates for positions on the Business 
Board of the Collegian will meet in the 
Collegian office this afternoon at 3 p. m. 




SPORTS 




Seven Veteran Booters 
To Meet W.P.I. Saturday 



SI CI II III 



CAPTAIN KENNEDY WILL LEAD 
TEAM IN OPENER 



CAPTAIN 



Seven lettermen form the nucleus 
of the State soccer team which travels 
next Saturday to Worcester to meet 
Worcester Tech eleven. The State 
booters are eager for a win, not only 
to avenge two successive defeats for 
the past two years against the Wor- 
cesterites, but also to give State an 
edge in the team rivalry which stands 
at three wins each for the two schools. 
Two weeks of practice sessions show 
that State can field a team equal to 
the most ambitious schedule in its 
soccer history. "All-American" Cap- 
tain Joe Kennedy will lead the team 
from his accustomed right half posi- 
tion. Bob Buzzee and Bob Feinburg, 
two lettermen, are still in heavy com- 
petition for the other flanking half- 
back position. Both of last year's 
starting fullbacks, Vin Couper and 
Kay Conway, are back in school. 
Podolack, a sophomore, however, may 
displace one of the vetearns. Center 
half is a toss-up between Conway and 
Adams. Turner, ineligible last year, 
but goalie two years ago, will guard 
the nets, with Benjamin a capable 
substitute. Kyle and Golub, both 
lettermen, have the upper hand at the 
outside forward positions, with Conant 
the leading substitute. Don Osley 
seems to have center position clinched. 
Candidates for the inside posts are 
Rodda, Lyman, Roberts, Silverman, 
and Johnson. 

Worcester Tech is more or less an 
unknown quantity, since both fresh- 
men are allowed to play on the var- 
sity and the State game is its first 
contest. However, in McEwen, a 
sophomore center who scored two of 
the three goals against State last year, 
Tech has one of the best forwards in 
eastern intercollegiate circles. "Stop 
McEwen!" is the password for a 
State victory. 




When the State football team takes 
the field next Saturday at Bowdoin, 
the boys will all be equipped with 
natty new uniforms. Whipcord ma- 
roon pants and striking maroon jerseys 
with wide white shoulder pads and 
numerals ought to make the Bay 
Staters conspicuous. 



With only three games at home this 
year, and the first one not until the 
17th, the bleachers and scoreboard 
out on the athletic field look very 
much out of place. 



First Caraway Team 

Faces Bowdoin Squad 



Frigard Named 
New Varsity 
Five Coach 



Of interest to the students as well 
as to some of the faculty is the news 
that the date of the Freshman-Sopho- 
more gridiron brawl has been changed 
this year. Unlike past games which 
have been held at the close of the 
varsity season, this year's encounter 
is slated for Wednesday, November 
11, Armistice Day. It seems to us 
that this change is a good idea, filling 
in a mid-week holiday and giving 
everyone interested a chance to witness 
the spectacle. 



LOU Hl'SH TO COACH 
FRESHMAN TEAM 



THE 



Joe Kennedy 
State Soccer Captain 



Harriers Open 
With Maroon 
Here Saturday 



STATESMEN OPEN SEASON ON 

HOME coram 



Sport! 



Greek sports 
To Begin On 
Tuesday Next 



1. Varsity squad men are not eligi- 
ble for intramural competition during 
the term. 

(a) Men who have been dropped 
from the varsity squad because 
of ineligibility in their scholastic 
work shall not be allowed to 
compete in any intramural ac- 
tivities for that term. 

(b) Any man dropped from the 
varsity squad for infractions of 
rules will not be eligible for intra- 
mural activities for the term. 

(c) Any freshmen squad men are 
subject to ineligibility upon the 
request of the coach of any re- 
spective freshman sport. 

id) A man is not eligible to com- 
pete in any interfraternity sport in 
which he has ever won a varsity 
letter. 

2. Fraternity pledges may partici- 
pate in interfraternity competition. 

3. Any team using an ineligible man 
will automatically forfeit the game. 

1. There will be no postponed 
ts without the sanction of the 
I'livsical Education department. 

6, A man may participate in only 
"ne sport per night. 

6. Any team not ready to play 
1 'hin five minutes of the time sched- 

i shall forfeit the game to oppo- 
'• nti, If both teams scheduled to 

) fail to appear, both shall be 
liven a loss and no such games shall 
1 •• rescheduled. 

7. All protests must be filed within 
1 hours with Sid Kauffman of the 

1'hysical Education department. 



In its first contest of the season, the 
varsity cross-country team will en- 
gage the Springfield College harriers 
this Saturday on the home course. 
The initial gun will be at 2:30. This 
will be the first meet with Springfield 
College since 1928. 

The starting team for the States- 
men is as yet indefinite. In the first 
trial of the season last Monday, 
Mitchell NeJame, a letterman, and 
Lawrence Pickard, a sophomore, 
showed the way. They were followed 
by Beaumont, a letterman, Couhig, a 
spring trackman, Slater, Reade and 
Stoddard, three sophomores, Little, 
a letterman, Roberts, a veteran, and 
Harris. Ingram, a fine prospect, did 
not compete. 

With only this week left for in- 
tensive training, the Statesmen will 
probably not be in finest form for this 
first meet. They have an enviable 
record to maintain in that the State 
cross-country teams have not lost a 
home meet in five years. 



NeJame and Pickard copped honors 
at the cross-country time trials last 
week by coming in neck-and-neck. It 
seems that these harriers are doing 
all right by themselves and the team 
so far this season, covering the local 
course in 24.07 as compared with the 
time of 24.31 that Proctor and Samp- 
son recorded last year at this time. 
If Pickard and NeJame can show the 
same improvement as last year's stars 
did, State will have at least two men 
in the scoring this fall. 



Pageant Will 
Dedicate New 
Women's Field 



Wilho (Bill) Frigard has been 
named coach of varsity basketball at 
Massachusetts State the coming sea- 
son, it was announced yesterday by 
Curry S. Hicks, head of the division 
of physical education. He succeeds 
Mel Taube who resigned last spring 
to return to his Alma Mater, Purdue. 
Lou Bush, who like Frigard is act- 
ing as assistant to Coach Eb Caraway 
in grooming the State grid men, will 
act as mentor for the freshman 
quintet. 

Frigard, who won letters in foot- 
ball, basketball and baseball and 
graduated from M.S.C. in 1934, was 
named an instructor in physical edu- 
cation this fall. He is well qualified 
to tutor the Statesmen in the hoop 
game. He was a member of Taube's 
undefeated 1934 varsity quintet and 
last winter assisted in coaching. 

Bush, who is doing graduate work 
was engaged in high school coaching 
in North Carolina last year. Compar- 
ing favorably with his performance in 
football and baseball, his work in 
basketball was outstanding for three 
seasons and was climaxed in 1934 
when as a forward on Taube's unde- 
feated five he tallied a total of 167 
points during the season. 



Sophomores Fall 
Before Freshmen 



The class of 1937 still remains the 
only dry class in recent years as the 
result of the ducking given the present 
sophomore class by the class of 1940 
in the annual rope pull last Saturday. 
Last year the present sophomore class 
was victorious. 

With the lightest man on the team 
weighing over 147 pounds, the fresh- 
men took the lead from the opening 
gun, and when the final gun was fired 
the knot in the center of the rope was 
well in freshman territory. The soph- 
omores walked through the pond. 



Plans for the formal dedication of 
the recently completed women's ath- 
letic field are being formulated under 
the direction of Mrs. Curry Hicks, 
head of the department of physical 
education for women. October 23 has 
been set aside as the tentative date 
for the dedication. 

Although in their incipient stage at 
present, plans call for a division of the 
program into a short formal ceremony 
including addresses by prominent per- 
sonages of the College, and a pageant 
depicting in symbolic form the con- 
struction of the field and the season 
progress of the workers. The cast will 
include all the girls of the school. The 
various developments of the pageant 
have been sectioned and assigned to 
five groups. Alpha Lambda Mu, the 
first group, will depict the primary 
stage of the work on the athletic 
field; and Lambda Delta Mu, the 
second group; Sigma Beta Chi, the 
third group; Phi Zeta, the fourth 
group; and Sigma Iota, the fifth 
group, will in turn offer interpreta- 
tions of advanced stages of the con- 
struction. Progress and activities of 
the laborers will not be dramatized, 
but will be picturesquely suggested 
through the medium of the dance. 
Appropriate costumery is being 
planned. 



SPORT CALENDAR 

Football. M.S.C. vs. Bowdoin 
at Brunswick, Saturday 

Soccer. M.S.C. vs. W.P.I, at 
Worcester, Saturday 

CroftH Country. M.S.C. vs. 
Springfield, at home, Saturday 



Continued from Page 1 
be set back by the loss of a guard and 
a back, while State may have some 
trouble filling left tackle. 

With the graduation of "Power- 
house" Koenig, Stewart, Sturtevant, 
and "Where's Elmer" Allen, prac- 
tically a new backfield had to be 
drafted by Coach Caraway. Several 
of the backfield lineup show distinct 
signs of promise. Sabin Filipkowski 
or Babe Brown will probably start at 
the right halfback position against 
Bowdoin, while Towle or Czelusniak 
will take care of left half. Either 
Russ Hauk or Bill Bullock are slated 
to start as quarterbacks next Satur- 
day, while George Niden, playing hiB 
first varsity game for State will be at 
fullback. 

In the line, Captain Rossiter will 
fill the pivot position, flanked by two 
able veteran guards, Ed Bernstein 
and Fred Sievers. Both men look 
good at the outset of the season, and 
seem to be playing much better ball 
than they did last year at this time. 
Wingmen next Saturday will be Wendy 
Lapham at left and Moseley at right. 
Left tackle will probably be O'Brien 
while either Gray or Perkins who are 
at present out with injuries will prob- 
ably be playing right tackle. 

Like the State team, Bowdoin has 
lost several valuable men through 
graduation. Three of last year's senior 
linemen are consequently missing and 
two other line stars have not reported 
for duty this fall. This leaves Walsh 
with only two veteran men, George 
Griffith, left tackle, and Harold Ash- 
kenazy, right guard, in the line. 
Walsh was ready with replacements 
for the three seniors but is having some 
difficulty developing n right tackle 
and a center. 

Captain Buck Sawyer will quarter- 
back the team for the third season, 
seconded by Bob Smith who played 
guard last year. A shift in the Bow- 
doin backfield finds Junior Frye and 
Brick Reed sharing left halfback 
duties. Bob Gentry, a light, right 
halfback, weighing 147 pounds, will 
probably start Saturday, with veteran 
Ara Karakashian at fullback. 




now 300 

YEARS OLD.i 



Early oay meals' consisted 

of: breakfast- bread and beer. 

dinnlp. - i lb meat, supper - 

BREAD AND MILK ' 



8. All varsity or freshmen squad 
men that are declared ineligible for 
interfraternity athletics shall auto- 
matically contribute one point to 
their fraternity's total score for that 
particular season. 



VARSITY 




FOOTRALL SCIIEDl LE 




October 




3 Howdoin nt Rrunswick 




10 Conn. State nt Storm 




17 R. I. Stnte at M.S.C. 




24 W.P.I, at M.S.C. 




31 Amhernt at M.S.C. 




November 




7 Conot CJunrd, New London 




14 R.P.I, nt Troy 




21 Tuft* at Medford 






PORTERHOUSE 
TAVERN, 

A FAVORITE 

WITH 
.STUDENTS 
IN THE EARLY 
I800'S\ WAS 
FAMOUS FOR 
IT'JT DRINKS 
AND STEAKS 1 - 
HENCE PORTER- 
HOUSE STEAKS' 



fc CAMPUS STATUE BEARS" 
THE INSCRIPTION. 'JOHN HAZARD, 
FOUNDER, l«6" ALL OF THESE 
STATEMENTS ARE rAL9E A FOR 
JOHN HARVARD WD NOT FOUND 
TUB COLLEGE \ IT WAS FOUNDED 
IN Ifc56 v AND IT IS NOT A STATUE 
OF HARVARD BECAUSE NOBODY 
KNOWS" WHAT HE LGfcKED UKE ' 



3 



» flACR 



W 

Crimson , the 

school color, 
originated from 
the large ban- 
danna handkercueif.' 

(Faculty 'snooping* 
caused the "great 

REBELLION OF- I&2* " 
WHICH RESULTED IN OVER 
HALF OF THE SENIOR CLAS; 

BEING EXPELLED A FEW 
WEEKS BEFORE COMMENCEMENT 




ROOM AND KARD 
HAS INCREASED 
30 FOLD ANP 
TUITION IF 3 

70 TIMES w 
HIGHER THAN 
WHEN 

HARVARD • 
WAb YOUNG' 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 554 



Northampton, Man 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 193G 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. OCTOBER I. ItM 



Work on Grounds to Be Continued 

Throughout Fall and Spring Season 



Grounds Department 
Improves Roads 

Construction and renovation of the 
campus, which has been in progress 
for the last four years, will continue 
through the fall and spring. 

During the summer a macadam 
road was built from the Experiment 
Station to Flint Laboratory, a new 
parking area was begun behind GoCM- 
mann Laboratory, Draper Hall, and 
Stockbridge Hall, sidewalks were put 
in at the Waiting Station and the 
Drill Hall, the foundation of a new 
4-H building was laid, and the girls' 
athletic field was completed. The 
town of Amherst is repaving the part 
of Pleasant Street that crosses the 
campus. 

Plana la* Full 

Work planned for this fall includes 
paving a part of the triangle, formed 
by the new macadam road near 
Draper Hall, to provide a straight 
walk across the intersection, grading 
and planting of the sides of the new- 
macadam road, scraping of the new 
parking area behind Goessmann, grad- 
ing of the new ambulance entrance at 
the Infirmary, and continuation of 
the tennis court project. 

In the spring, the new parking area 
will be completed and surfaced with 
tinders, the new 4-H clubhouse will 
be finished, and work may begin on a 
road which will cut diagonally across 
the field opposite the physical edu- 
cation building. 

Space for .">00 Car*. 

With the replacement this summer 
of the cinder road in front of Goess- 
mann Laboratory, the faculty parking 
area opposite the building was elimin- 
ated, and replaced with a parking 
area behind the building with space 
for 500 cars of faculty and students 
commuting from the north. After the 
loam is removed, the area will be 
levelled and surfaced with cinders. 
Six roads will lead in and out of it. 
Although incomplete, the area is al- 
ready in use. 

Construction of a sidewalk over the 
steam tunnel to the Waiting Station 
from Goessmann Laboratory carried 
out a plan formed when the tunnel 
was built. It was proposed at the 
time to use the concrete top of the 
tunnel for a walk. However, for 
drainage purposes, the new walk Is 
built over it. 

On the south side of the campus, a 
concrete walk has replaced the cinder 
path leading from Lincoln Avenue to 
the side entrance of the Drill Hall. 

New 4-H Clubhouse 

On the west side of the campus, a 
4-H clubhouse, a companion house to 
the present Farley 4-H clubhouse, is 
being built under the supervision of 
Larry Peck. The new building, 43 
feet by 63 feet, will contain a main 
floor 30 feet by 50 feet. 

Upon completion the new house will 
provide a large assembly hall, and 
facilities for games, both of which the 
Farlev 4-H clubhouse lacks, and to- 



Much Improved Freshman Handbook 

Makes Belated Campus Appearance 



Distinguished by several new fea- 
tures and catalogued information, the 
1936-37 freshman handbook made its 
belated appearance on the State cam- 
pus this week. 

Although the same in appearance 
and in several of the articles, this 
year's book presents a decided im- 
provement over the last issue. 

Mod** Printed 

Each individual section is intro- 
duced by a particular title page and 
pictures. The Honor Council page has 
been supplemented by a copy of the 
pledge, a hither-to-unmentioned neces- 
sity as far as freshmen are concerned. 

Freshmen women are informed as to 
the rules and regulations of the 
W.S.G.A. which has direct control 
over their behavior for the first part 
of their stay at M.S.C., and the rules 
are explained in simple and concise 
language. 

Information for the benefit of the 
members of the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture has been segregated and 
assembled in one section instead of 
being scattered all over the book as 
was the case in former years. 

Mcssinie to Freshmen 
A new addition to the store of in- 
formation contained in the book is a 
message by the president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council, in the way of ad- 
vice as to the thought and decision 
connected with the affiliation to a fra- 
ternity. Rushing rules, of which there 
are several new ones this year, have 
been divided into sections and ex- 
plained in full detail. The sorority 
rushing rules have been increased by 
the addition of the new bidding rules. 
The traditions and customs which 
Mass. State men hold dear to them 
are listed in a new section with a title 
page. The old familiar customs of 
saying "Hi," ringing the tower bell, 
and attending the night-shirt parade 
have been augmented by the news of 



PREVIEWS 



gether with the Farley 4-H clubhouse 
will provide separate dormitories for 
men and women during meetings of 
4-H groups on the campus. 

The clubhouse will be completed as 
far as possible before winter. 

Student* Employed 

Superintendent Armstrong of the 
grounds department has announced 
that between twenty and twenty-five 
students will be employed by his de- 
partment on various projects this fall. 

Planting of trees along the new road 
in front of Goessmann and the raising 
of sidewalks a foot where they meet 
the construction on Pleasant Street 
will be completed before winter. 

Further grading will be necessary 
at the infirmary where an ambulance 
entrance has been built, and on the 
new parking area behind Goessmann 
Laboratory. 



the Winter Carnival which was in- 
augurated last year. 

Who's Who 

"Who's Who at M.S.C." is written 
in much more orderly and therefore 
clearer fashion and will enable the 
freshmen to recognize the various and 
sundry notables about campus. 

Of special explanatory benefit to the 
freshmen will be the new article on 
the bewildering mental tests which 
each new student faces and wanders 
through before he is officially a 
"stude" at the college. For a long 
time freshmen have gone blunderingly 
through the "psych" exams without 
the slightest idea of what it's all about. 
But this article will, in the opinion of 
the editors, help clear up the situation. 

An Improvement 

All in all, this handbook is an im- 
provement over last year's edition. It 
is more compact and more better 
organized. Less verbose and more to 
the point, it will be a welcome addition 
to the bewildered freshman's library. 

It will be distributed from the 
Student Religious Council office in the 
Memorial Building between 4 and 5 
o'clock for the rest of the week. 



Gilkey Talks on 
Life Technique 



Dr. James Gordon Gilkey of Spring- 
field, delivered a sermon on "New 
Starts in Life" at the first Vesper 
service of the coming series on Sunday 
afternoon in the Memorial Building. 

In answer to the question, "What is 
the technique of making a new start 
in life?" Dr. Gilkey made the follow- 
ing suggestions: study the new task, 
and you will find some thoroughly 
familiar and manageable elements in 
it; find ways by which to strengthen 
your resolution and endurance; al- 
ways keep the rules you have laid 
down for yourself; remind yourself 
of the powers that lie undiscovered in 
your heart. 

In his usual manner Dr. Gilkey 
drove home his points by means of 
numerous stories taken from life. 

Members of Adelphia, campus hon- 
orary society, ushered. 



A good show is worth seeing again, 
which probably occasions the recall 
next Tuesday and Wednesday of "The 
Private Life of Henry VIII." Laughton 
and Company will be as welcome as 
they were before. But in the enthusi- 
asm for Old England, those who like 
a good comedy shouldn't slip over 
"Piccadilly Jim," that other English 
bit to be shown Sunday and Monday. 

Advance notices from the theater 
also show a well planned series of 
pictures for the next few weeks, for 
"Anthony Adverse," "Swingtime," and 
"Midsummer Night's Dream" are on 
their way. 



4-H Club Meets 
Next Wednesday 



Plan for National 
Forum to Convene 
On Campus in 1937 

Baker Appointed to Board 
Of Directors 



INTERFRATERNITY SING IS GIVEN 
PLACE ON DAD'S DAY PROGRAM 



The first meeting of the Massachu- 
setts State College 4-H Club will be 
held in the Farley Club House on 
Wednesday evening, October 7, at 
7.15, George L. Farley, state club 
leader, announced today. 

All students at Massachusetts State 
College who are or have been 4-H 
Club members or who are interested 
in 4-H activities are invited to attend 
this meeting. Mr. Farley especially 
urges freshmen interested in 4-H work 
to attend this first meeting of the year. 

Present plans call for a meeting of 
the M.S.C. 4-H Club each month dur- 
ing the school year. 

Officers of the club are as follows: 
president, Charles E. Eshbach '37; 
vice-president, Forrest Hartin '37; 
treasurer, Nelson Newell S'37; his- 
torian, William Avery '38. The pro- 
gram committee is made up of Phyllis 
McDonald '39, Frank Kingsbury '38, 
Lawrence Bixby '39, Margaret Cal- 
kins '37, and Douglas Graves S'37. 



Plans are underway to hold the 1937 
annual national forum of the American 
Country Life association at M.S.C 
President Baker stated this week. Dr. 
Baker was appointed to the board of 
directors of the association at its 
meeting last August in Kalamazoo. 
Michigan. 

The association was originally 
founded in January, 1919, by Kenyon 
L. Butterfield, president of M.S.C 
from 1906 to 1924. The purposes of 
the association are fourfold: 

1. To promote discussion of the 
problems and objectives in countr> 
life and facilitate the means of their 
solution and attainment. 

2. To further the efforts and in- 
crease the efficiency of persons and 
agencies engaged in this field. 

3. To disseminate information cal- 
culated to promote a better under- 
standing of country life. 

4. To aid in rural improvement. 

The Country Life association pub- 
lishes each year a book reviewing the 
papers, addresses, and talks given at 
the annual session, and also published 
the magazine, Rural America, monthly 
except June, July, and August. 



BARsaonrs cape 



ICE CREAM 



LUNCHES 



Students of Massachusetts Slate 
College will be given their first oppor- 
tunity to entertain their Dads at the 
college on Dad's Day, October 24. 

The main features of this year's 
Dad's Day will be the football game 
between State and W.P.I, and the 
interfraternity sing. The sing, which 
is usually held in the spring, will be 
an added feature this year. As the 
sing is part of the interfraternity 
competition, the committee believes 
that this will provide excellent enter- 
tainment for the dads. The remainder 
of the program will be announced at a 
later date. 

Committee* Announced 

Leroy Clark, general chairman of 
the committee, has announced the 
following committees: 

Entertainment: Kenwood Ross, 
chairman, Donald Cadigan, Elinor 
Stone. Registration: Herbert Brown, 
chairman, Louise Rutter, Priscilla 
Bradford, Chester Conant, and Harry 
Snyder. Invitation: Priscilla Brad- 
ford, chairman, Bettina Hall, and 
Harry Snyder. 

Reception: Robert Spiller, chair- 
man, Robert Buzzee, Elinor Stone, 
and Leroy Clark. Military: Leroy 
Clark. Publicity: George Haylon, 
chairman, Robert Buzzee, and Ken- 
wood Ross. 



James Hodder 
Heads Committee 



The Horticultural Show which is 
held annually in the Physical Educa- 
tion Building is being planned for 
November 6, 7, and 8. Plans are, as 
yet, incomplete. 

W. J. Hodder '37 is general chair- 
man. Faculty chairman is Professor 
Thayer; student chairman of flori- 
culture is N. W. Butterfield. The 
rest of the plans will be completed at 
a later date. 



FIVE NEW MEMBERS 
CHOSEN FOR A. B. 
DEGREE COMMITTEE 



SMOKES 



Serving a quiility £1iikm of HKKlt 

llallantine'H Ale 

Hampden Cream Ale 

Bonded Wines 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 



Electric Wiring Supplies 
Electric Grills, Casseroles 
Electric Coffee Pots 
Electric 1 -Burner Stoves 
Electric Lamps and Bulbs 
Philco and R.C.A. Radios 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



L 



Persian and India Prints 

for Table or Chiffonier 
Covers, Wall Hangings 

Miss Cutler s 
GIFT SHOP 

COLLEGE 
CANDY KITCHEN 

Always Reliable 
Best Food Best Soda 

Fountain Refreshments 
Pastry Candy Nuts 

Pi ices reasonable 

Excellent Service 

SARRIS RESTAURANT 



FOR YOUR COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 
HUY AT ROLLES AND SAVE 

"Bostonian" Shoes are the outstanding shoes 

for college men. In rich cordovans — reverse 

calfskins — in smooth and grain leathers. Real 

values from 

$7.00 to $10.00 

Other makes S2.95 and up 

For women the latest in dress and sports 
footwear at prices you can afford to pay. 

"As You Like It" Hosiery in all the popular 
weights and shapes. 79c to $1.35 



Bolles Shoe Store 



JAPANESE SCHOOLBOY 

Continued from Page 1 
to cut. Very difficult. Rope is mov- 
ing. Follow rope, but not getting 
someplace. Begin to sweat. 

Finally someone fire gun again, and 
in minute people run into water. 
Think how crazy. 

"Come on, you too," man with 
black hat with red and white stripes 
say to me. He give shove into water. 
.Japanese schoolboy are very, very 
confused. Try to help, get thrown 
into water. Are resolved next time 
let men break rope alone. 

Monday come, and somebody wake 
up Japanese Schoolboy very erly and 
make to sing at girls. More confuson. 
Wonder when boat are leaving. Japan- 
ese Schoolboy begin to suspicion fowl 
play, as are said in America. Today 
get note, say "You are overcut in 
German, English, history, chemistry, 
and all subjects." Big question now 
is how are found out who it are that 
cut rope? And why think Japanese 
Schoolboy also cut all other things? 
Suggest editorial by Colligian editor 
to suggest that .because man do thing 
once he are not do it all time. All 
very confused. 



Five new members have been put 
on the student committee trying to 
procure an A.B. degree for the College. 

Julian Katzeff '38, Herbert Brown 
'38, George Haylon '39, Elizabeth 
Streeter '38 and one other girl yet to 
be selected make up this group. 
Katzeff is majoring in Pre-med, Brown 
in Forestry, Miss Streeter in Home 
Economics. 

Sometime during the week the com- 
mittee is planning to organize and 
start work for the coming year. 



Alphii Ciuimitfi Hho 

Alpha Gamma Rho initiated one 
new member, Roger H. Decker, this 
week. 

Alpha Si&mn Phi 

Officers for the coming year elected 
last Monday are Alfred Bruneau '37, 
president; John Kabat '37, vice- 
president; Franklyn D. Berry '.'17, 
treasurer; Russell E. Smith '38, cor- 
responding secretary; William Mc- 
Cowan '39, secretary; and Carl J 
Bukina '38, marshal. 

FH ATE KN IT Y A V K It A< JES 

Continued from Page 1 

the last semester of 1935-36 are as 

follows: 

Fraternities 

Phi Lambda Tau 80.41 26 mem. 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 78.08 15 " 

Kappa Epsilon 77.07 39 " 

Kappa Sigma 76.88 37 " 

Alpha Sigma Phi 76.53 18 " 

Phi Sigma Kappa 75.96 43 " 

Alpha Gamma Rho 75.85 24 " 

Q. T. V. 75.69 31 " 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 75.31 21 " 

Theta Chi 75.31 33 " 

Lambda Chi Alpha 74.48 23 " 

Sororities 

Alpha Lambda Mu 81.09 16 " 

Sigma Iota 80.37 9 " 

Sigma Beta Chi 79.34 29 " 

Lambda Delta Mu 78.92 31 " 

Phi Zeta 78.41 31 " 

Average* 

All Men 75.95 

All Women 76.16 

Nonfraternity 75.49 

Nonsorority 73.78 

All College 76.01 



NEW REDFERN ART COLLECTION 
DISPLAYED IN MEMORIAL HALL 



MANY DOCTORS 
WILL ADDRESS 
PRE-MED CLUB 



Prominent doctors are scheduled to 
address members of Pre-med club on 
the campus this fall. On October 22, 
Dr. Hough will give the first talk. 
"Medicine in Russia." 

Others who will probably speak at 
later dates are Dr. Kisil of Springfield, 
Dr. Elkind of Boston, Dr. Meyerson 
of Boston, and Dr. Zelinski of Holyoke. 

Officers elected last fall are Philip 
Chase '38, president; John Talinski 
'37, vice-president; Julian H. Katzeff 
'38, secretary; and Robert Gage '38, 
treasurer. 

Forty students have joined this 
organization whose purpose is to 
acquaint pre-med students with the 
field of medicine. 

The fall program of the newly- 
formed M.S.C. Pre-med club will open 
with a business meeting in Fernald 
Hall next Thursday at 7:30. 



Slide Rules 75c to $5.00 Triangles Protractors 

T Squares Drawing Pens and Brushes 

A.J.Hastings ""SKEST 17 So. Pleasant St. 



STUDENT SUPPLIES 

Loose Leaf Notebooks . . . Fountain Pens ($1.00 and up) 
Inks all kinds . . . Book Ends (25c and up) ...Dictionaries 
(all languages) . . . Typewriter Paper 500 sheets 69c 
Manila Sheets 500 sheets 45c . . . Artist Materials. 

NEW AND STANDARD BOOKS 
We will get any book in print. 

JAM£5 A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



roLLKUIAN COMPETITION 

Continued from Page 1 
Robert McCartney, John J. Powers, 
Dorothy Merrill, Carolyn Monk, 
Nancy E. Luce, Helene Pelissier, 
Fletcher Prouty. 

Morton J. Pearlman, Arthur Noyes, 
Sydney Abramovitz, Jacqueline Stew- 
art. Dorothy R. Morley. Robert 
Staples, G. Godfrey Davenport, Jr. 
Arnold Glashow. 

Joseph A. Bortasiewiez, Richard 

(llondon, Richard P. Joseph. Donald 

Shaw, William H. Richards. Donald 

I Ma honey. Robert Dunn, Robert 

limps, John J. McCarthy. 

Franklin M. Davis, Jr., John Kilios, 
BugWM Deneault, Norman Miller, 
Robert M. Chapman, Sidney Lip- 
liires. 

Sophomores include George Brody, 
Irinces Merrill, Jeanette Herman,, 
Mdney Rosen, Bettina Hall, Mabelle 
Booth. 



ACiOKA 

Continued from Page 2 
they hold an almost unlimited power 
over destiny of the school. Organiza- 
tion and cooperation is all that is 
needed. However the student body 
isn't now and isn't ever likely to get 
together to the extent of helping them- 
selves and overcoming their voluntary 
inertia. No, the school will remain 
under the heriditary rule of the so- 
called big shots. What's the use? 

Senior 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Continued from Page 2 

Minnie Reeord Club 

There will be a meeting of the 
Music Record Club in the Memorial 
Building, Tuesday afternoon at 4:30. 
All interested are invited to attend. 

Band 

The Band will start its regular re- 
hearsals tonight, Thursday, at 7:30 in 
the Memorial Building. Those who 
couldn't come to tryouts last Tuesday 
and who would like to play in the 
Band are urged to attend. There will 
be rehearsals every Thursday night 
at the same time and place. 

Phy*. Ed. OmmM 

Sophomore elective Physical Edu- 
cation will begin on Tuesday, Oct. 6. 
Classes will meet on Tuesday and 
Wednesday from 2:50 to 4:30. 



JUDGING TEAMS 

Continued from Page 1 

The general livestock team included 
Leroy Clark, Horace Bolton, and John 
Brooks, and was coached by Mr. R. 
W. Phillips. Its score was 2264 out 
of a possible 2550. Pennsylvania 
State College placed first in this 
division with New Hampshire and 
Cornell second and third. 



I.iiiuImIh Delta Mu 

On Tuesday, Sept. 29, a tea was 
held at the sorority house in honor of 
the new faculty wives and patronesses 
of the sorority. Elinor Brown '38 was 
in charge. 




THE COLLEGE STORE 

Featuring Student Needs 

on M.S.C. Campus 

Luncheonette Soda Fountain 

Sunday Night Special 

WIN TIIK RADIO 

The Quink Ink Way 

( Olltisl cloMCN Oct. 15 



Matinee 2:30 Evening 6:30 8:30 



Fri.-Sat. 

Lionel Barrymore and 

Maureen O'Sullivan in 

"THE DEVIL DOLL" 

— and — 

WALT DISNEY REVl E 

'One hour of Mickey Mouse and 

fSilly Symphony cartoons. All in 

technicolor. 

Also 3 Stooges Comedy 



CONVOCATION 

Continued from Page 1 

gave up this position to assist Dean 
Briggs of the Harvard University 
English department. Later, he re- 
signed his position in order to devote 
more time to writing and lecturing. 
Mr. Brown is the author of numerous 
books, some of which are: Dean 
Briggs; Lonely Americans; and the 
Creative Spirits. He has also written 
for Harper's and the Atlantic Monthly. 

A special program which is to be 
distributed to all students is being 
prepared by the Dean's office. It will 
contain the names of the newly 
elected Phi Kappa Phi members, the 
candidates for departmental honors 
and the Dean's scholarship groups. 

The program has been arranged as 
follows: 

Academic Procession 

Statement of the Purpose of the Day 
by the Dean 

Main Address by Rollo Walter Rrown 

Song by James Kerr 



FACULTY ADDITIONS 

Continued from Page 1 
assistant professor of biology, is a 
graduate of Depauw. He received his 
MA. and Ph.D. at Harvard. 

Other new instructors are John N. 
Everson, who is to be instructor in 
agronomy; Daniel C. Plastridge. labo- 
ratory assistant in agricultural eco- 



Consisting of a collection of prints 
by members of the Redfern Color 
Print Association, an Knglish organi- 
zation, the first monthly art exhibit 
has been set up this week in Memorial 
Hall. These are the color block prints 
which have become a fad during the 
last few years, and which were de- 
veloped to their highest hy the old 
Japanese and by modern English 
artists. 

Fifty Print* 

There are about fifty prints in the 
collection. Among the outstanding 
ones is that entitled Affaire d' ffonneur 
by Tschudi, depicting a duel, and re- 
markable for the movement which it 
portrays. Rhythm by H. (Jreengrass 
is exceptionally successful in repre- 
senting rhythm in the picture of a 
negro band. Whence and Whither, the 
work of Cyril E. Power, is an inter- 
pretation of the theme from the 
Rubaiyat. "The nightingale that in 
the branches sang, Ah, whence, and 
whither flown again, who knows." 
Divertissement, also by Mr. Power, 
stands out for its arresting line and 
form. 

Sports Representation* 

Night Fishing by Margaret Barnard 
is notable for its study in color and 
shade. There is also a group of 
modernistic representations of sport, 
hockey, rugby, cricket, rowing, run- 
ning, and skating, and a more con- 
ventional group of five studies of 
flowers. All of the prints are striking 
through their bold colors. 

The present exhibit of the Amherst 
Camera Club in Goodell Library 
comes from the Syracuse Camera 
Club and will remain through the 
month. 



nomics and farm management; Chester 
W. Smith, laboratory assistant in 
agricultural economics and farm man- 
agement. 

C. Collis Lyle, Jr., who was a 
graduate student last year, has been 
appointed as a new instructor in 
German. 



P 



Sun. -Mon. 

Robert Montgomery ill 
"PICCADIU.V JIM 

Plus: G«argi« Stoll Band 
Popeye Pat he News 



■ 



COMMUNITY CONCERTS 

Continued from Page 1 

will be announced at the close of the 

campaign. 

The officers of the Amherst Com- 
munity Concerts Association are: Wm. 
P. Bigelow, president; Charles Fraker, 
Vincent Morgan, and R. C. Magoun, 
vice-presidents; Stowell Coding, secre- 
tary; Frank Nestle, treasurer; Mrs. 
John L. Rogers, campaign manager; 
and Frank Stratton, publicity. 



HYGBONIC I>RY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



Tue.-Wed. 

Charles Laughton in 

'•Pit IV ATE LIFE 

OF KIMi HENRY VIII" 

with Merle Oberon Robert Donat 
Binnie Barnes 



I 



Added Technicolor 



Sport.' 



i 



WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

TIIK CUT BATE STOKK 

The Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. is the only cut rate drug 
store in town. We cut prices on all patent medicines, 
drugs, cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco, to the extent that 
we challenge comparison. Our cut rate policy is extended 
also on our modern and up-to-date soda fountain bar. It 
is our privilege to call to your attention and impress upon 
you the word CUT RATE. It is a symbol of saving 
money in your own pocket book. It's wise to be thrifty. 

Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. 

TIIK (IT RATE STORK 



L 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

.3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hi6h«rln*sed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



WELCOME 

Upperclassmen know, and freshmen soon learn, that 

Thompson's Clothes combine quality with low price. 

Michael-Stern Clothes Arrow Shirts 

Mallory Hats Interwoven Sox 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five year* 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and 



Haberdashery 



6 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1936 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



IUCKEY-FREKMAN CLOTHES 

Hickey-Freeman is a young man's organization. 
No wonder their clothes are so smartly styleful. 



Editorial Board Competition for the 

Massachusetts Collegian 



All Freshmen and Sophomores who are candidates for positions 
on the Editorial Board of the Massachusetts Collegian will meet 

in the Collegian office at 7:30 p.m 



TUESDAY 



7:3© P. M. 



>H3IOItl \l HALL 




. . . for tobacco 

cut right to smoke right 



There's a right way to carve a chicken or slice a ham. 
And there's a right way to cut tobacco. 

When the tobacco in your cigarette is cut the way 
it is in Chesterfield . . . right width and right length 
... it burns even and smooth ... it smokes better. 



CURRENT 

KVENT 

M. S. C. 

vt». 

Conn. State 




(Mfijiiui 



'it rsTANDJNG 

l\ K\ 1 

Scholarship 

Dm 



Vol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8. 1936 



No. 3 



Phi Kappa Phi Elects 
13 From Senior Class 



CLASS WAR 

ON 
THE CAMPUS 



121 Freshmen Pledge 
During Fall Rushing 



Four Are Now Majoring 
In Distributed Sciences; 
Thomas Is Awarded the 
Phi Kappa Phi Prize 



Thirteen students of the senior class 
have been honored by membership in 
Phi Kappa Phi, the honorary society 
at the Massachusetts State College. 

I Those elected are: Melvin Irving 
Cohen of Boston, a distributed science 
major; Richard Clancy Desmond of 

I Lynn, a major in langugages and 

I literature; Shirley Gale, of Marble- 
head, a major in Botany; Barbara 
Knox Keck of Boylston, whose major 
is languages and literature; Samuel 
Klibanoff of Springfield, a major in 
distributed sciences; Morris Lerner 
of Springfi^d, a major in distributed 
sciences; Leo David Lipmann of 
Springfield, also a major in distributed 

I sciences; George McLean Milne of 
Lexington, an English major; Lucille 
Amelia Monroe of Southbridge, an 
Knglish major; William Henry Moss 

I uf Fairhaven, also an English major; 
Roger Kingman Pratt Jr. of Brockton, 
whose major is entomology; Carl P. 
Swanson of Rockport, a botany major; 

I and Albert Stetson Thomas of Bur- 
lington, Vt., an economics major. 

Albert Thomas has been awarded 
the Phi Kappa Phi prize. 



Exchange Students 
To Be Discontinued 




According to an announcement made 
I by Fred J. Sievers, Director of the 
Craduate School, there will be no 
Herman Exchange student accepted, 
nor any appointed from this college. 
Financial restrictions was given as the 
I reason. 

Commenting on the decision, Mr. 
I Silvers said: "It has been our gener- 
ally accepted policy, more or leas, to 
participate in an exchange relation- 
ship with the Institute of Inter- 
national Education, under which re- 
lationship we supported in the Gradu- 
1 School a graduate of some ap- 
proved school. It has been deemed 
impossible to continue the policy this 
I ■ r because of an inadequacy of 
Minds. Consequently no successor 
Iwill be appointed to Baron Von 
I hoot-neck who held the graduate 
assistantship last year, and who has 
|i'« turned to Germany. 

Incidentally the forced policy oper- 

to the disadvantage of any of our 

L'raduates who were eligible and might 

jliave been given similar recognition by 

I reign university". 



16 MORE OUT FOR 
STAFF POSITIONS 



Six new members have been added 
<> thirty-eight students who have 
dy entered the 1936 competition 
»r positions on the editorial board of 
Massachusetts Collegian. 
I hey are Everett Spencer '40, 
* umner Levy '40, Edwin Rossman 
Penjamin Spungin '40, Katherine 
ran '40, and Henry Schreiber '40. 
1 his bring the total to forty-four 
inpetitors, of which forty are mem- 
i of the class of 1940, and the re- 
nder of the sophomore class. 



Alpha Epsilon Pi Leads 
with Eighteen; Many 
Freshmen Prefer to 
Wait Until February 



Freshmen and sophomores engaged in their annual battle on Razoo Night, October 2. The sophomores won by a 
score of 118 1-2 to 44 1-2. The photograph was taken during the Battle Royal, the highlight of the evening. 



MUSICAL CLUBS 
TO REORGANIZE 



Amalgamation of the orchestra, 
men's glee club, and women's glee 
club was announced this week. At 
the same time it was announced that 
the groups will present Gilbert and 
Sullivan's Utopia Limited this winter. 

Last year the three groups com- 
bined informally to present Gilbert 
and Sullivan's Trial by -hiry, the first 
operetta to be presented on the 
campus in many years. 

Irving Heads Hoard 

The combined clubs are headed by 
a board of five managers: Dick Irving, 
manager of the orchestra: Roger Cole, 
his assistant; Barbara Keck, manager 
of the women's glee club; Barbara 
Strode, assistant; and Bernard Kohn, 
manager of the men's glee club. Dick 
Continued on Page 6 



New Doctor Added 
To Health Service 



FIRST SOCIAL 
UNION OCT. 19 



Dr. Ernest J. Radcliffe, college 
physician, announces a new addition 
to the student health service on 
campus. She is Dr. Florence Jenney, 
former resident doctor in the Child- 
ren's Hospital of Pittsburgh. 

Dr. Jenney, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, will make her 
office in the South Building of the 
Infirmary and, in addition to her 
health service duties, will take charge 
of girls' freshman hygiene. 

Dr. Radcliff announces further that, 
as soon as the North Building of the 
Infirmary is ready for occupancy, all 
beds in the South Building will be 
moved into it and the South Building 
will thenceforward be used as an out- 
patient department. The change will 
be effected as soon as the kitchen in 
the cellar of the North Building is 
painted. 



Monday, October 19, has been 
chosen as the definite date for the 
appearance of Harold Bauer, pianist, 
as a Social Union presentation. His 
program has not yet been announced. 

Born and educated in England, 
Harold Bauer began his musical career 
as a violinist at the age of nine when 
he made his first public appearance. 
Later, on the advice of the famous 
Paderewski, he took up the study of 
the piano and became an accomplished 
artist on this instrument. 

In 1900, after a long and successful 
tour of the Continent, he made his 
first appearance in America as guest 
artist with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and has continued to make 
appearances with this musical organi- 
zation. 

Continued on Pagt 6 



College Receives Nation-Wide Congratulations 

After Presenting June 17th Radio Broadcast 



When President Roosevelt gets fan ' 
mail, that's to be expected When a 
movie idol receives fan mail, that's 
not to be wondered at. But when | 
college gets fan mail, that's news. 
And when the college is Massachusetts 
State College, that's News with a 
capital N. 

On June 17 this year the college 
presented a broadcast over a nation- 
wide national broadcasting company 
hook-up. 

Letter* Pour In 

Following the broadcast, letters 
from as far south as St. Petersburg, 
Florida, and as far west as New 
Mexico, came pouring in to President 
Baker's office. Old grads, well-wishers, 
and interested listeners were among 



O 1936, Liggett tc Myers Tobacco Co. 



those who wrote to express thanks and 
congratulations. 

A friend in St. Petersburg, Florida, 
not an alumnus of this college, re- 
ported "a very worthwhile program." 

"I think the whole thing was very 
well done and without doubt many 
people have become better acquainted 
with the college, its purposes and 
activities," wrote one member of the 
Department of Agriculture in Boston. 
From CIhm* of 1921 

"As a result of receiving notice of 
the Massachusetts State broadcast 
over the N.B.C. farm and home hour, 
we listened in today. It was mighty 
nice to hear Dean Machmer, who 
eased tnv path through college as he 
has many others. . . You picked some 



fine musical selections that we enjoyed 
very much," wrote in a graduate of 
the college in the class of 19J4, who is 
at present a member of the depart- 
ment of entomology and economic 
zoology in a midwestern university. 

The program itself was an hour in 
duration and consisted of talks by 
President Baker and various members 
of the faculty and administration, a 
series of skits, and musical selections 
by the musical organizations at M.S.C 
The broadcast was directly from the 
campus and was conveyed to the 
entire United States over the N.B.C. 
national farm and home hour hook-up. 

Wants Catalogue 

"As a result of your radio broad- 
Continued on Page 4 



One hundred and twenty-one men 
pledged fraternities this fall according 
to figures available last night. Last 
fall 163 men pledged. Alpha Epsilon 
Pi leads the list with nineteen pledges. 

Numbers pledged by other fraterni- 
ties are Kappa Sigma 16, Phi Sigma 
Kappa 14, Theta Chi 13, Phi Lambda 
Tau 12, Kappa Epsilon 11, Alpha 
Sigma Phi 10, Alpha Gamma Rho 8, 
Q.T.V. 6, Lambda Chi Alpha 6, and 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 6. 

Names of students pledging the 
eleven fraternities are as follows: 

Alpha Kp.silon Pi. Freshmen, Ber- 
nard Silberl>erg, Robert Rodman, 
Sumner Levy, Sidney Lipshires, Ben- 
jamin Spungin, Meyer Zelbovitz, 
David Sawyer, Morris Burakoff, Dana 
Malins, Harvey Fram, Paul Fram, 
Harbert Morris, Edward Rossman, 
Arthur Adelson, Arnold Glashow, 
I^eonard Rice, Henry Schreiber, Martin 
Pearlman; Henry Winn '39. 

Alpha (iaiiima Klio. Freshmen: 
Wendell Washburn, John Smith, Ver- 
non Smith, John Wolfe, Wallace 
Wyman, Wilfred Winter, Robert Shel- 
don; Robert Cole '39. 
Alpha Sigma Phi. Freshmen: Harold 
Wilson, George Tobey, Robert Mosher, 
Kenneth Pike, David Norelli, Rino 
Raffinoli, Homer Stranger, John Miller, 
Ray Parmenter '39, I^ee Shipman '39. 

Kappa Sigma. Freshmen: Deane 
Beytes, Robert Chapman, Charles 
Gleason, William Goodwin, Thomas 
Herrick, Robert Jones, Charles Mc- 
Laughlin, John Merrill, Charles Pow- 
Continued on Page 6 

Mountain Day Date 
Remains A Mystery 

Great mystery shrouds plans for the 
annual Mountain Day In fact, it is 
unknown whether or not there are any 
plans at present. The true extent of 
information which has been received 
at tl.. office is that it will be impossible 
to wait for full moon. 

Mountain Day is a much heralded 
event each year. For one solid after- 
noon classes and all other activities 
are called off and the student body, 
even unto the faculty, desports itself 
on Mt. Toby. 

J. Harry Rich, in French Hall, half 
admitted that he had something to do 
with arrangements, and promised that 
he would have some information for 
next week's Collegian. This informa- 
tion, unfortunately, does not include 
the date. Collegians will be on sale at 
all newstands next Thursday. Re- 
serve your copy now. 

DEAN TO REMAIN 
MATH. DEPT. HEAD 

No efforts are being made at present 
to replace Professor Ostrander whu 
retired in 1935 as head of the mathe- 
matics department. Dean Machmer, 
who has been acting head since Pro- 
fessor Ostrander's retirement, will 
continue in that capacity for an in- 
definite period according to announce- 
ments received this week. 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER H, 1936 




/Ifoaesaclweew Collegian 



Official ntwipaper of the Masaachuwtt? State Inline. J'ullUhed eTery Thursday by the student*. 

LOUIS A. BRKAl'l.T "37 K.iitor-in-chief 
FREDERICK 1.1NDSTKOM '88, MaiuiKinK IiHior WALTER GlRAl-MCK '37, Associate Editor 



PHILIP B. SMIEF'37, Edttoi 
RICHARD C. DESMOND *37 
JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 38 
MARY P. OCONNELL'38 
MAURICE TONKIN ':<* 
ROBERTA D. WALKEY 3S 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 
ALFRED M. SW1REN "3* 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletic* 
JULIAN II. KATZEFF '38, Editor 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '3,s 

Make-up Editor 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37 

StockbrUlfte Correspondent* 
RALPH HARRIS 8*37 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE 8**7 

Financial Ad viser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Advlaer 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 




THOMAS J. ENR1GHT '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37. Business Manager 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr. 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38. Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME '38 DONALD L. SILVERMAN '38 

SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 00 PER YEAR. 



Make all •rders payable U Tht Ktiu<tiuilii ColUgian. la case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager a* soon as possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
tribution* ara sincerely encouraged. Any communications or notices must be received at the Collegian 

•Cce before 9 o'clock. Monday evening 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In Section 1103 
Act of October 1917, authorlied August 20 

1 918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North 
Street, Northampton, Mass., Telephone 554 



1935 Member 1936 
Ptesocided Golle6iate Press 

Distributor of 

0olle6iate Di6est 



One of the things that discourages 
many a student from continuing his 
education into graduate school is the 
number of times ho is forced to laugh 
at the same joke. Sometimes the joke 
is varied a little from year to year; 
sometimes it appears garbed in wolf's 
clothing; more often it comes to you 
garbled in Fox's clothing. Hut here's 
a variation of what we call for want of 
a better name the statistician joke. 

"There are FOUR kinds of liars 
liars, damn liars, statisticians, and 
government statisticians." 



YOUR SENSITIVE ZONE 
Our underground system of 
agents uncovered the following 
lucid occurrence that had as its 
leading character our favorite 
jokester professor, who at the 
moment was explaining to his 
class the intricacies of the sensi- 
t ive zone. 

"When you hear a good joke," 
he elucidated, "it tickles your 
sensitive zone and you laugh. If 
it's a hum joke, then you proh- 
ahly read it in the Collegian." 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday, Oct. 8 

7:30 p.m. Band, Memorial Bldg. 

7:30 p.m. Pre-Med Club, Fern- 
aid Hall 
Saturday, Oct. 10 

2 p.m. Football, Conn. State at 
storrs 
Monday, Oct. 12 

Holiday 
Tuesday, Oct. 13 

8 p.m. Men's Glee Club, M Bldg 
Wednesday. Oct. 14 

7 p.m. Home Economics Club 

meeting, Homestead 

8 p.m. Orchestra, Mem. Bldg. 
Thursday, Oct. IS 

11 a.m. Convocation, Miss Jo- 
sephine Schain, "The Future 
of the World Community" 

7:30 p.m. Band, Mem. Bldg. 

8 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Memorial Building 



Stockbridqe 



NEW RECORD 

ENROLLMENT 



Announcements 



EDITCaQIAL 

POST MORTEM AFTKR PLEDGING 

Fraternity pledging is over for another semester and again the 
Collegian is forced to comment on the pledging system in force 
at this college. 

This year there was a noticeable increase in the number of 
freshmen who are purposely waiting until the second semester to 
make their choice of fraternities. Freshmen clearly indicated this j 
to the horde of fraternity men who invaded the dormitories the ' 
last two or three days before pledging. 

The reason for this attitude on the part of a great deal of the 
freshmen is not that they have not enough interest to associate 
themselves with a fraternal group, but rather that they recognize 
even better than does the interfraternity council that what is 
most needed in the consideration of fraternities is time. We do 
not mean by this that those men who pledged during the first 
semester have made a hasty choice. In some instances this may 
be so. but in any case the validity of first semester choices is not 
to be questioned. 

However, we feel that this semester more than any other in 
our experience at college indicates that this should be our last 
first semester pledging season. We don't care to repeat the old 
arguments about the same they've been knocking around edi- 
torial columns, dormitories, faculty talks and fraternities for any 
number of years and although the interfraternity council has 
often come near to making the change, the first semester season 
is still in force. 

This year the interfraternity council came nearer than ever. 
Talk buzzed about by interfraternity council members last 
Friday afternoon made it almost a campus certainty that such a 
change was to be made that evening. However, the council 
considered the time too near the appointed pledging season to 
do anything about it. 

Many fraternity men have considered this recent rushing 
svstem as a farce. Few people were at all serious as to the manner 
of conducting it. Fraternities will admit that, although the council 
attempted to cut rushing expenses, too much money was spent 
rushing the freshmen. 

It's an'easy matter for a freshman to make himself likeable 
to a number of fraternities, enjoy their rushing privileges and then 
refaee to pledge. Whether or not freshmen actually do this will 
hardly be known, yet we feel that fraternities would spend less 
money uselessly if pledging was during the second semester. 

As it is now. fraternities have to throw themselves at the 
freshmen in a manner hardly satisfactory to both groups. Give 
US second semester pledging and you will see the freshmen doing 
their own rushing. And both themselves and the fraternities will 
be glad of it. 



TEACHER'S PETS 
Once upon a time a local prof domesti- 
cated a porcupine. For some time porky 
and the prof got along on fairly good 
terms. It was with great mutual sorrow 
that the two finally parted company 
after porky, in an unguarded moment, 
ate all the woodwork off the prof's ice- 
chest. 



INFORMAL 

There will be an informal on 
Saturday evening, October 17, after 
the Rhode Island game — our first 
home game Help to make a day 
and an evening of it. 

Informal Committee 



TRANSITORY KNOWLEDGE 
This is the time of year when assign- 
ments get so far ahead of the student 
that he is forced to begin pursuing 
his studies. 



TSK, TSK ! 
A chem lab assistant dolefully re- 
marks that water and alcohol seem to 
have different reactions. On what, we 
have not the slightest idea. 



Riding Classes 

Riding classes for faculty and for 
co-eds will be held each Tuesday for 
co-eds and each Thursday for faculty. 
Hour, 3 p.m.; cost, 50c per rider per 
session. First co-ed class, October 13; 
first faculty class, October 15. 

Those interested in participating are 
requested to send names to Military 
department on or before October 12. 

Conn. State Game 

Mass. State students planning to 
attend the Connecticut State vs. Mass. 
State football game this Saturday 
should have their Activities tickets 
with them. 

Mass. State students having their | 
Activities tickets will be admitted for 
one-half the regular admission plus the 
full tax, or 60c. General admission is 
$1.10. 

Pre-Med Club 

There will be an important business 
meeting of the Pre-Med Club tonight 



l . 
in 



EVOLITION 

When a freshman quotes a great 
man, he calls it a quotation. 

When a sophomore quotes a 
great man, be believes that its <*««»" may be made. 
swell original thought. Fcrn.ild Cluh 

When a junior quotes a great 
man, its an allusion. 

Kut when a senior quotes 
great man that's an illusion. 



The first semester for Stock bridge 
School freshmen began last Monday. 
The class, numbering 148 students, 
and including students from New 
Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, 
New York, and Connecticut, is one 
of the largest in the history of the 
school. Following is a list of the 
registered freshmen. 

William S. Allen, Bertha B. Antes, 
Francis A. Ashline, Martti Asikainen, 
William C. Atkins, Howland F. At- 
wood, Knight A. Badger Jr., Philip 
A. Baum, Arlene Beach, Lawrence 
Bearce, Beverly S. Bein, Edwin A. 
Benchley Jr., Virginia Bigwood, Wil- 
liam S. Boettcher, Sanford Bookless, 
Charles H. Bothfeld, Clyde T. Bren- 
nan, Eben B. Brown, Walter H. 
Brown Jr., David R. Bulkley, Ru- 
dolph L. Bume, Frederic M. Burnham 
Jr., Paul F. Callahan, Byron Canney 
Paul S. Cavanaugh, Rudolph E. 
Choun, Richard Clayton, Rachel L 
Clough. 

Robert F. Coffin, Philip N. Colby, 
William G. Collins, Charles H. CUis, 
William W. Cooper, John A. Costa, 
Charlotte L. Cox, Frederick A. Cush- 
ing Jr., Howard P. Davidson, James 
N. Deary, Silvio P. DeBonis, John 
DeSpencer, Vernon G. Doty, George 
C. Douglas, Gardner T. Dunham, 
Philip W. Elmer, Richard H. Emery, 
Norman W. Estabrooks, Arnold M. 
Fischer, Herbert. W. Fisk, Walter G. 
Foster, Ernest C. Fournier, Roy L. 
Frye, James P. Gibson, Walter F. 
Golash, Earle S. Goodale, Henry T. 
Griffin, Edward H. Haczela, Ivan 
Hakes. 

Lowell K. Hammond, Ellis C. 
Harlow, Herbert Harris, George S. 
Hartley, Percival V. Hastings Jr., 
Rolf Heitmann, Edwin Helander, 
Walter M. Hobbs, James J. Jenkins, 
Robert Jenney, John Jesse! , Chester 
M. Johnson, Norman Kehoe, John E. 
Kennedy, Henry F. Knightly, Vaughn 
Kochakian, Charles W. Ladd, John 
I W. Lawrence, Norwood F. Lincoln, 
| Hyman Litwack, Donald Luther, Ro- 
land E. Lyon, Arthur Maki, William 
A. Malmi, Maynard F. Marsh, Ed- 
ward Martinsen, Joseph Martula. 
Freeman Meader. 

Edward Melnik, Lloyd Miett, Wini- 
fred E. Miller, Leon E. Millett Jr., 



at 7:00 p.m. at Fernald Hall. All 

Pre-Med students are urged to come Raymond D. Munde, Fred H. Murray, 
order that plans for the coming \ George W. MacDonald, Robert Mi- 
Hardy, William J. Nagle, Donald 
Nason, William H. Nehring, Mar 

4,i"""l \'"" . , garet Neilson. Robert E. Nelson, Ivar 

The first meeting of the Fernald * 

^,i i_ ii l u u Nielson, Richard B. North, Wesley 

Entomology Club will be held 



Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow 

The wind may sigh and shriek, but 



on 
a Thursday, Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. in Fernald 
Hall. Philip Stone will talk about his 
experiences in Colombia this summer. 
Club officers will be elected for this 
term. 



Debating 

There will 



TIIK FACT MY WRITES MYSTERIOUSLY 

A short time ago the editor was the recipient of a very inter- 
esting note addressed to him by a faculty member. It seems that 
the professor would like to do some anonymous writing for the 
Collegian, It seems also that he does not even wish to take the 
editor into his confidence and admit his identity. The editor, he 
thinks, cannot keep a secret. 

We are sorrv that we have to thwart the journalistic aspira- 
tions of the faculty. But the present board will adhere to the 
policy of not printing B single contribution unless the identity of 
the writer is made known at least to the editor. 

Incidentally, the idea of faculty comment in the Collegian is a 
good one. We wish the elusive faculty member would call the 
editor into conference. 

As far as secrets are concerned, the editor is keeping a couple 
good ones already and he will be very glad to keep this one. 

How about it, Mr. F? 



RAS.OO DERE, CHARLIE? 

Well, another Razoo Night has CORM 
and gone, another evidence that nature 
\n the ronr U seldom mild. 

We doff our hat to the resourceful 
sophomore who. lacking a syllabus 
used hs a text in one of his classes, 
waved aloft a college catalog when the 
prof demanded a showing of texts. 

I he prof beamed approval at the 1001 

showing. 

We always thought that the catalog 

was one of the least-read publications 
on campus. 



it can never blow a whiffle. Kut the 
wind is only one in a series of influ- 
ences that turn the freshman head 
whiffle-conscious. Take the case of 
the frosh who went uptown and had urged to attend, 
his locks shorn in the regular conser- 
vative style. . 

"Shall I put something on it?" — 

queried the barber from a pile of 
clippings. 

"Yuh," grunted the frosh. 
The barber grabbed a Flit -gun and 
sprayed. 

Seventy-rive cents, please," de- 
clared the barber upon completion of 
his reforestation project. 

And the frosh walked out, a con- 
vert to the army of whiffles who look 
just as well with nothing on. 



be a meeting of the 



Nutter, Harold Oehler, John E. Oino 
nen, John E. Parker Jr., Stanley F. 
Parker, Wallace R. Parker, Samuel W 
Peckham, Estelle N. Peirce, G. Harold 
Phillips Jr., Elizabeth Pieper, Eugene 
M. Provenzani, Norman J. Reillv, 
John E. Rice Jr. 

Charles Richardson, Oliver M. Rich- 



men's debating team Thursday eve- ardson, Robert D. Riedl, Louis A 
ning at 8 o'clock in the Memorial R U ggles, Theodore A. Russell, Peter 
Pudding. All men interested are N. Schall. Louis C. Schwaab, B. Loui- 

Searle, Walter J. Seelig II. Henry I. 
Continued on Page 6 Continued on Pagr 6 



DADS' DAY 



A 

Z/JL\\ students of 



the college are openly 
urged to take a few minutes out either 
today or tomorrow and write a letter 
home explaining just what the coming 
Dads' Day is all about and also offer- 
ing parents a further invitation to visit 
you on the 24th. Won't you do this 
today? 

Dnds' Day Committee 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLUSG1AN, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 8, 1936 



TWO STATE TEAMS VICTORS IN OPENERS 



Shin Kickers Subdue 

Worcester Tech 7 - 4 




Sophomores Make Good 
Showing as New Sys- 
tems Are Successful 

State inaugurated its soccer season 
last Saturday by decisively beating 
Worcester Tech 7-4 at Worcester last 

(Saturday. Both a good showing by 
the unseasoned sophomores, who 
scored five of the seven goals, and the 
hoary veterans, proved that Coach 
Brigg's new system of offensive and 
defensive play will show to very good 
advantage. 

Exhibiting its scoring power from 
the outset of the game, State drew 
first blood when Charlie Rodda, fresh- 
roan captain of last year, found the 
Tech nets with an accurate punt. 
Tech evened the count when the 
famed Dave McEwen shot the ball 
past goalie Turner. State retaliated 
when Don Osley scored to give State 

la short lived lead. The first period 
ended in a deadlock when Holt 

| evened the count for Worcester. 

From the second period on, State 

I clearly showed its supremacy by out- 
playing Worcester in every depart- 
ment of the game. In the second 
quarter Tom Lyman, Charlie Rodda, 

|and Don Osley scored a goal each. 
McEwen once broke through his 

I guard to count for Tech. 

In the third period Stan Podolak, 

I outstanding sophomore fullback, per- 
formed the remarkable feat of scoring 
from the full position in midfield. In 
the same period the Engineers made 
their last scoring play when Holt 
tallied. Charlie Rodda ended the 
State scoring spree by counting in 

I the fourth. 

Outstanding for State was the 

I offensive work of center Charlie Rodda 
and forward Don Osley, and the re- 
markable defensive work of Vin Couper 
and Stan Podolak. Couper guarded 

I McEwen like a hawk, and held him to 
two goals — good work considering 
that Dave is one of the best forwards 
ever seen in collegiate circles. Time 

|and time again Podolak broke up 
Continued on Page 6 



SOCCER TEAM 
MEETS STORRS 
RIVALS NEXT 



Conch Briggs to Start Same 
Line-up Saturday 



State will be out to make it two 
straight when the varsity soccer team 
meets Connecticut State at Storrs 
next Saturday. 

The Connecticut squad is not only 
small, but also handicapped by the 
lack of experienced players. Four 
lettermen: Captain Hayes at full, 
Goldring at half, and Child and 
Janiga, forwards, form the nucleus of 
the team. Other men who have seen 
service are Shipley at half, Burton at 
forward, and Loeffier in goal. The 
remainder of the squad is filled with 
stars from last year's yearling squad. 

The Connecticut team, as evidenced 
from the play of previous years, is an 
aggressive, rough and tumble club 
that would rather play the man than 
the ball. The men frequently man- 
euver out of position thus enabling a 
good passing attack to catch them off 
guard. To date State has been Coach 
Dennerly's nemesis, for in the six 
years of State soccer history, Connec- 
ticut has yet to emerge victorious. 

Coach Briggs will probably start 
the same lineup at Storrs as he did at 
Worcester last Saturday. Among the 
starters were four sophomores: Lyman, 
Rodda, Cain and Podolak. Sam 
Golub, however, may spell Cain at the 
outside forward position. Capt. Joe 
Kennedy is recovering from a "sharley 
horse," and will probably be in top 
shape by Saturday. In practice ses- 
sions this week, Coach Briggs is 
emphasizing team co-ordination in the 
hope of continuing the State scoring 
punch and winning streak. 



BUCKSHOT 



MICHIGAN'S" 
FAMED 

WILLIE HESTON 

SCORED 
OVER. 110 
TOUCHDOWNS" 
FROM 1901 
TO 1905/ 



RAN 210 

YARDS FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN . 

LEHIGH V LAFAYETTE 
HE-RANINTHE. 

WRONG DIRECTION 

CIRCLED THE GOAL- 
POSTS, AND RAN 
WX AGAIN THE 
LENGTH OF THE 

i FIELD.' 




***> 



SKIVT DAVIS. 

OKLAHOMA UNIVERSITY, KICKED 
23 GOAL? AFTER TOUCHDOWN? 
IN ONE <3AME X SEPT. 29, 1917. 



*& 



c*e» 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



WHAT THIS roi I .!•:«.!•: NEEDS 



Gridmen Edged 14-12 

In Bowdoin Opener 



Telephone 654 



Northampton, M 



What this college needs is a good 
fighting mascot. What with additions 
to buildings, roads, faculty, and 
courses, everyone seems to have over- 
looked the possible addition of a 
mascot to the college tradition. For 
the past few years there has been a 
growing desire on the part of some of 
the students to enhance some, the 
college tradition by the adoption of a 
suitable mascot which will be repre- 
sentative of the State College spirit 
as well as inspirational (perhaps) to 
the Statesmen when they meet other 
colleges on the gridiron, basketball 
floor, baseball diamond, etc. 

So, beginning this week the Collegian 
in an effort to give rise to a mascot, 
will conduct a contest open to every- 
one — undergraduates, faculty, and the 
alumni. Prizes and judges for the 
contest will be announced in next 
week's issue. But in the meanwhile 
remember that the Army has its mule, 
Princeton has its tiger, Yale has its 
bulldog, New Hampshire has its wild 
cat, and Amherst has its Sabrina. 
What will the M.S.C. mascot be. 
Get busy, think it over, and present 
your ideas on the blank at the bottom 
of the page, or in person at the Col- 
legian office. 

Watch the sport page for further 
developments. 



RUNNERS DOWN 
SPFL'D COLLEGE 
HARRIERS 16-39 



FOOTBALL MEN 
PLAY AT C.S.C. 
ON SATURDAY 



With a well played game behind 
them, the Statesmen make their next 
try for a win against a well primed 
Connecticut State eleven at Storrs 
next Saturday afternoon. 

Last year, playing at Alumni Field 
on Dads' Day, the Taubemen beat the 
Nut meggers 25-12. The game, re- 
plete with many thrills, featured 
Stewart's passing, a 65-yard run by 
Elmer Allen, and a 98-yard run for a 
touchdown by Carney of the visitor's 
team after a recovered M.S.C. fumble. 
The game was entirely State's with 
scoring by the Taubemen in every 
period. 

The Conn. State team is a hard 
driving, rough and tumble outfit 
which is yet to be scored upon this 
fall. They specialize in hard line 
drives at which they seem to be adept, 
perhaps mainly through the power of 
backfielder Lewis, who scored the 
Nutmegger's first touchdown of the 
season against Brown. Coach Chris- 
tian's team opened against Brown 
setting the Bears back 27-0. Last week 
playing Wesleyan, the Connecticut 
Staters were defeated 3-0. 

Coach Caraway will probably start 
the same lineup as he did in the 
Bowdoin game. 



State Team to Run at Frank- 
lin Park, Saturday 



The varsity cross-country team got 
off to a good start by defeating the 
Springfield College harriers 16-39 last 
Saturday afternoon at Alumni Field. 
In winning their twelfth consecutive 
home start, the Statesmen had four 
men tied for first place and just 
missed a perfect score of 15. 

With Pickard and NeJame of State 
setting the pace most of the way, 
Ralph Ingram, going over the course 
after only one trial, caught up with 
the leaders. In view of the finish line 
the State trio waited for Beaumont to 
come alongside. They would also 
have waited for Little, but Holder of 
Springfield, sprinting ahead to take 
fifth place, forced them in for a quad- 
ruple tie for first place. Little took 
sixth place. 

This Saturday the State harriers 
will meet much stiffer competition in 
the Northeastern Huskies at Franklin 
Park, Boston. Although Northeastern 
was nosed out by Connecticut State 
last Saturday, 27-30, Captain Johnston 
and "Hawk" Zamperelli took first and 
second places, respectively, for the 
Huskies. The Statesmen will be seek- 
ing their fourth straight victory over 
Northeastern, having won last year 
27-30, 22-33 in 1934, and 26-30 in 
1933; but having lost in 1932, 39-20. 

The summary: 

Tie for first between Pickard, In- 
gram, NeJame and D. Beaumont, all 
of State; Holder, Springfield, 5th; 
Little, State 6th; Hampson, Spring- 
field, 7th; Slater, State, 8th; Harris, 
State, 9th; Reade and Sampson, 
State, tied for 10th; Couhig, State, 
12th; Snow, Springfield, 13th; Mege, 
Springfield, 14th; Gillis, Springfield, 
16th. Time- 25m. 3s. 



FROSH ELECT 
FALL SPORTS 



CALENDAR 

Football. Mass. State vs. Conn. 

State at Storrs, Saturday. 
Croaa-Country. Mass. State vs. 

Northeastern at Boston, Sat. 
Soccer. Mass. State vs. Conn. 

State at Storrs, Saturday. 



Plans are being completed for the 
various fall sports for freshmen. Each 
freshman has signed up for one of the 
squads, and practice will begin soon. 
Inasmuch as all freshmen are re- 
quired to participate in one of the 
team games, enrollment in most of the 
sports is unusually large. Eighty-two 
frosh will report for the freshman 
football eleven, a decrease of eight in 
the number of men who reported last 
year. The soccer squad will be larger 
since thirty-seven have filed intentions 
of competing for berths. Fifteen will 
report for cross-country, twenty-one 
for all-semester track, and twenty-five 
for all-semester swimming. 

Most of the freshman teams will 
engage in some form of competition. 
Coach Derby, in charge of cross- 
country men, plans to engage the 
Stockbridge runners and the Amherst 
freshman and junior varsity teams. If 
the ability of the freshmen warrants 
it, the team will compete in the 
annual Intercollegiates at Boston on 
November 9. 



Team Scores Twice But 

Fails to Make Point 

After Touchdown 

Edged out of an opening win by 
two conversion kicks, the Statesmen 
bowed to Bowdoin 14-12 last Suturday 
afternoon at Brunswick. As usual tin- 
State team made a persistent aerial 
attack throughout the game, scoring 
in the even quarters. 

Both teams resorted to the air fre- 
quently but the Bowdoin passing 
attack was effectively smothered. The 
Caraway men were successful in the 
air completing eight of their eighteen 
passes. Six of the completed passes 
registered first downs. Czelusniak to 
Brown seemed to be a favorite air 
route for the team. 

Obviously testing his material, 
Caraway sent twenty-three men into 
the game last Saturday against Bow- 
doin. With the Bowdoin team out- 
played, and their weaker line under 
constant pressure from State, results 
of this first game were not at all dis- 
couraging in spite of the two point 
loss. 

The Caraway team opened the 
game strong, making the first period 
decidedly theirs. But no score was 
chalked up by either team until State 
brought the ball behind the goal line 
early in the second quarter a long 
pass at the end of the first period 
brought the ball deep into Bowdoin 
territory and Czelusniak rushed the 
ball over to score the first touchdown, 
for State. The attempt to convert 
by Lindin failed. Soon after, Bowdoin 
also scored after Karakashian ran the 
kickoff back 44 yards to State's 36- 
yard line. 

The third period saw the ball see- 
sawing back and forth until Newman 
and Corey blocked Niden's punt, re- 
covered the ball, and Newman brought 
the pigskin across the goal line. State 
entered the last period with the score 
14-6 against them but managed to 
score once more before the final gun. 
Morey, playing left-end recovered a 
Bowdoin fumble on the enemy's 25- 
yard line. Niden, went through to 
Bowdoin's 4-yard line, and Towle, on 
an end run, scored the last State 
points in the game. The game ended 
soon after, as the Statesmen seemed 
to be on their way to another touch- 
down. 

Outstanding in the Bowdoin line 
were Ashkenazy, and Griffith, while 
in their backfield Karsokas, Reed, 
and Karakashian showed to good 
advantage. 

The summary is as follows: 
Mum,. State. Lapham, Morey, le; 
O'Brien, Fisher, It; Sievers, Linden, 
lg; Rossiter, Collins, c; Bernstein. 
Roberge, rg; Gray, Perkins, rt : Mose- 
ley, Southwick, Howe, re; Hauck, 
Bullock, qb; Towle, Czelusniak, lhb: 
Filipkowski, Brown, rhb; Niden. 
Steff, fb 

Continued on Page 6 



Contest Blank 



l»:H. 



Your Name 



Your Vmliersi Address 
Your < lass 



Your Suggestion 







HIE MASSACHUSETTS COLUMBIAN, Till RSDAY. OCTOBER 8, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 193U 



MAJ0RI1 Y OF 
1936 CO-EDS 
ARE PLACED 

51 of the «W Co IMJN Have Obtained 
Positions 

Out of the sixty-eight co-eds who 
were graduated, fifty-one have posi- 
tions or are taking other courses in 
business or hospital training or are 
doing graduate work. The other 
seventeen are either at home or un- 
reported. 

Following is the list of co-eds and 
their positions: Helen Allis, teaching 
in Chesterfield; Harriet Andrus, per- 
sonnel office, Forbes & Wallace, in 
Springfield; Elizabeth Baker, dietitian, 
Black Horse Inn, Hingham; Florence 
Bilsky, course in Yale Medical School; 
Clare Bosworth, training course, Bos- 
ton City Hospital; Barbara Bradley, 
teaching in New Marlboro High 
School. 

Ella Bridges, housekeeper, Worth- 
ington; Elva Britton, Federal Baking 
Co., Worcester; Helen Bruns, sales 
work at Hovey's in Boston; Marion 
Bullard, statistician in agricultural 
economics department at Mass. State; 
Mary Cawley, graduate student at 
M.S.C.; Madelin Chase, business 
course; Mary Cooney, unreported; 
Dorothy Corcoran, at home; Lois 
Crabtree, unreported; Janina Czaj- 
kowski, assistant dietitian at the 
Belchertown State School; Barbara 
Davis, unreported; Hazel Dow, cleri- 
cal work, Federal Land Bank, Spring- 
field; Frances Driscoll, at home; 
Eleanor Fillmore, teaching in Detroit 
Day School; Anna Flynn, clerical 
position in economics department at 
M.S.C.; Marguerite Ford, position at 
the Remington State School; Dorothy 
Garbose, unreported; Irene Gingras, 
unreported; Louise Gavone, office at 
the State Institution in Niantic, Conn. 

Elizabeth Hager, graduate assistant 
at M.S.C.; Christine Hakanson, sales 
work at Dunholm & MacKay in 
Worcester; Louise Haley, unreported; 
Constance Hall, graduate assistant at 
M.S.C; Alice Hopkins, dental assist- 
ant at Orleans; Frances Horgan, pupil 
dietitian at the Boston Dispensary; 
Leonta Horrigan, instructor in English 
at M.S.C.; Margaret Hutchinson, 
Mass. Mutual, Springfield; Marion 
Jones, Mass. Mutual, Springfield; 
Priscilla King, unreported; Lucy 
Kingston, Mass. Mutual, Springfield; 
Mildred Kleyla, pupil dietitian at 
Springfield Hospital. 

Marjorie Lannon, kennel assistant 
at New Bedford; Marguerite LeDuc, 
French teacher at the Ware High 
School; Dolores Lesquier, Mass. 
Mutual, Springfield; Madeline Lin- 
coln, temporary position, Canaan, 
N. E.; Elizabeth Low, home econom- 
ics work in the experimental kitchen 
of Lever Bros, in Cambridge; Helen 
Lubach, pupil dietitian, Monte Hospi- 




I ioiImLi Helta Mn 

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, a tea was held 
at the sorority ho'ise in honor of 
Mrs. Damon, house-mother. Justine 
Martin '38 was in charge. 



IMii /< <-• 

On Oct. 14 the Home Economics 
Club will meet at the Homestead at 
7 p.m. Each senior is to bring a 
sophomore, and each junior will be 
accompanied by a member of the 
freshman class 

Mrs. Henschel is assuming her 
duties as new housemother. 



Light-weight, Diminutive Freshmen Are 

Physically Inferior to Sophomores 



Sigma Belli Chi 

The sorority will sponsor a coffee 
dance after the football game between 
Mass. State and Rhode Island State 
on October 19. 

The second degree was adminis- 
tered to seven new members including 
Lois Macomber '38, Evelyn Parker 
'38, Frances Rathbone '38, Elizabeth 
Clapp '39, Nancy Parks '39, Rita 
Anderson '39, and Belva Sinclair '39. 

On Friday, Oct. 2, a tea was given 
to Mrs. Landers, housemother. Femin- 
ine members of the faculty and house- 
mothers of the other sororities were 
guests of honor. 



Sigma Iotn 

Anne Bernstein, former president 
of Sigma Iota, visited the campus 
October 5. 

Jeanette Herman is in charge of 
Sigma Iota's contribution to the 
forthcoming pageant. 



Alpha Lambda Mu 

Alpha Lambda Mu held a tea 
Wednesday afternoon in honor of 
their new housemother, Mrs. Edith 
Atkinson. Guests were Mrs. George 
Kauffman, Mrs. Harry Glick, Miss 
Miriam Morse, Mrs. Mary Broughton, 
Mrs. Charles Fraker, Miss Edna Skin- 
ner, Miss Helen Knowlton, Mrs. 
Sarah Collidge. 

Barbara Clark '37 has been recently 
chosen house chairman of Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 



How do the freshmen look to you? 
Green? Certainly. Nonchalant? 
Hardly. Swashbuckling and swagger- 
ing? Occasionally. Timid? Maybe. 
Unassuming? Well — no. Of mental 
giants they may boast a few. But of 
physical giants — a piteous sloth. 

For several days following registra- 
tion a steady stream of first year men 
shambled from doctor to doctor in the 
Infirmary, receiving their first annual 
inspection. Figures apparelled in sox 
and shorts were filed through the 
doctor's doors, while figures apparelled 
in pen and ink were filed in the 
doctor's books. 

Average 146 Pounds 

A survey of the final figures-in-ink 
shows that despite the added weight 
of shorts and sox, this year's freshmen 
averaged only 146 pounds, 4 pounds 
less than the average of last year's 
short-less, sox-less frosh. The heaviest 



man this year carries 205 pounds, a 
mere bantam besides last year's heavy- 
weight of 238 pounds. 

If this year's frosh boast the indis- 
putable advantage of being able to 
pass through doors easily, they also 
assume the danger of sliding through 
man-hole gratings. The 103-pound 
frosh featherweight this year is 12 
pounds lighter than his counterpart of 
last year. It would appear that the 
banana is in for a piece of tough 
sledding. 

Tullest 74 1-2 Inches 

The tallest frosh registers only 74 1-2 
inches and has to look up to his 77- 
inch predecessor; even as the shortest 
frosh must wear 2-inch platform shoes 
to attain the level of last year's short 
man. The average height of the frosh 
is 68 inches flat, while the height of 
last year's frosh was one or two hairs 
ahead with 68 inches plus. The dis- 
advantage of the whiffle is evident. 



EDITOR DISCUSSES 
THE WORLD CRISIS 



tal; Phyllis Macintosh, teaching home 
economics at Bradford, Vt.; Evelyn 
Mallory, married; Gertrude Martin, 
unreported; Dorothy Masters, pupil 
dietitian at Worcester Memorial Hos- 
pital; Lorraine Noyes, unreported; 
Dorothy Nurmi, business training; 
Katherine O'Brien, graduate assistant 
in home economics at M.S.C.; Edith 
Parsons, Mass. Mutual, Springfield; 
Marion Paulding, teaching home eco- 
nomics in Waterbury, Vt. High School; 
Bessie Proctor, a field secretary of 
Emergency Peace Campaign, 111., 
Iowa, Mich. 

Beatrice Rafter, assistant in embry- 
ology at Boston University; Helen 
Reardon, teaching in Amesbury; Ruth 
Reed, unreported. 



"The Catholic Church and the 
World Crisis" was the subject upon 
which Dr. Michael Williams, editor 
of the Commonweal, spoke at the 
vespers service on Sunday afternoon. 

Dr. Williams stated that "Men of 
the most divergent social philosophies 
agree as to the crisis in the world 
today." In considering the part that 
the Catholic Church is taking in this 
crisis, he said, "I maintain that the 
Catholic Church is resurgent today 
and acting with positive force." 

In dosing he stated, "Unless there 
is the solid rock of faith beneath our 
philanthropy and social service, the 
next period will be dark for humanity. 

After the service a large part of the 
audience adjourned to the lobby 
where Dr. Williams answered ques- 
tions pertaining to Catholicism. 



BARSELOniS CAPE 



BAND SCHEDULES 
FIVE APPEARANCES 



ICE CREAM 



LUNCHES 



SMOKES 



The band starts off a heavy season 
with five appearances this month at 
three football games and two other 
occasions. They will give a short 
concert for the State Federation of 
Women's Clubs just before the first 
game and will also play for the dedi- 
cation of the Women's Athletic Field, 
besides the Rhode Island State game 
on the 17th, the Worcester Tech 
game on the 24th, and the Amherst 
game on the 31st. 

With fifty men out for places on the 
band, the competition will be excep- 
tionally keen this fall. The band 
plans to buy several new uniforms, an 
added attraction. Several persons 
have been appointed to places on the 
administrative side of the organiza- 
tion, those being Conrad and Harry 
Hemond as assistant managers and 
Hanforth as librarian of music. 

Lt.-Col. Applington has agreed to 
drill the band for its appearances on 
the football field and with Stanley 
Bozek again in front with his baton 
the band should make a fine showing. 



COLLEGE FAN MAIL 

Continued from Page 1 
cast, I have become interested in yourl 
college and its possibilities of serving 
me in the fall," wrote one prospective 
student who heard the program from 
Clifton, N. J. "I would like to have a I 
catalogue of the courses you offer." 

A telegram to President Baker's 
office immediately after the broadcast I 
was concluded stated: "Congratula-I 
tmns on fine radio program. Thrilling 
to hear in Maine." 

One of the highest bits of praise 
came from the president of a well- 
known southwestern agricultural col- 
lege. He wrote: "I wish to compli 
ment you on the M.S.C. broadcast 
today (June 17). I have not heard all 
the previous land-grant college broad- 
casts but yours impressed me as thej 
best one so far." 

'72 Reports 

One of the oldest living graduates I 
of the college, a member of the class of 
1872, wrote in to say: "Enjoyed 
listening in on the broadcast from thej 
Dean's office this morning (June 17 ) 
It is nearest to a college handshake of J 
anything coming this way yet." 

Of special news to those who! 
missed the opportunity to hear this j 
Massachusetts State College broad- 
cast is the announcement in the] 
Alumni Bulletin of another radio 
broadcast to be presented in connec- 
tion with the annual, nation-wide! 
Alumni Night meetings on Thursday. 
November 5, 1936, over stations! 
WBZ and WBZA in Boston and | 
Springfield and short-wave station 
W1XK. It will be under the general j 
supervision of Francis Pray '31 and 
Robert Hawley '18 and will consist of 
talks by President Baker and Ralph [ 
Taber, president of the Associate 
Alumni of Massachusetts State Col- 
lege, music by the student musical | 
groups, and many other features. 

On Alumni Night, meetings will be] 
held in twenty cities of the United j 
States and Porto Rico, including 
Berkeley i Calif.; Fresno, Calif.; Lot 
Angeles, Calif.; Hartford, Conn.; New 
Haven, Conn.; Washington, D. C; 
Chicago, 111.; Concord, Mass.; Dan- 
vers, Mass.; New Bedford, Mas s .: 
Pittsfield, Mass.; Springfield, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass.; Geneva, N. Y. 
Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Phil 
adelphia, Pa.; State College, Pa.; 
Providence, R. I.; and Mayaquez, 
Porto Rico. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 



Electric Wiring Supplies 
Electric Grills, Casseroles 
Electric Coffee Pots 
Electric 1-Burner Stoves 
Electric Lamps and Bulbs 
Phil co and R.C.A. Radios 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Serving a quality gla.ss of IJKKR 

Ballantine's Ale 

1 1 . ■ 1 1 1 1 > < I « 1 1 Cream Ale 

Bonded Wines 



Key-Case Flashlights 
and Microlites 

Excellent small gifts for a man 



or a woman 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 



Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
Work called for and delivered Telephone 828 



Miss Cutler s 

(gtft %\m 

GKANDCNICC*/ 
IfSIUtANI 

A complete restaurant service 
from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Sunday Night Supper 

A pleasant stopping place for a 

sandwich or glass of beer 

after the theatre. 



Slide Rules 75c to $5.00 Triangles Protractors 

T Squares Drawing Pens and Brushes 

17 So. Pleasant St. 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



STUDENT SUPPLIES 

Loose Leaf Notebooks . . . Fountain Pens ($1.00 and up) 
Inks -all kinds . . . Book Ends (25c and up) ...Dictionaries 
(all languages) . . . Typewriter Paper 500 sheets 69c 
Manila Sheets 500 sheets 45c . . . Artist Materials. 

NEW AND STANDARD BOOKS 
We will get any book in print. 

JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



Graduate School Accepts 113; 

Many M.S.C. Graduates Enroll 



The complete Graduate School en- 
rollment for the first semester was re- 
leased this week by Director Sievers. 
Composed mainly of M.S.C. graduates, 
|t he list also includes students from 
Isuch colleges as Michigan State, Univ. 
|of New Hampshire, Rensselaer, Mid- 
Idlebury, Boston U., Colorado State, 
|J hirtmouth, Alabama Polytechnic, 
I Illinois, Columbia, and Tufts. One 
hundred and thirteen students are 
listed as follows: 

Elmer H. Allen, Chester I. Bab- 
Lock Jr., Roland F. Becker, Vernon 
|a. V. Bell, Abraham H. Belsky, John 
\V. Bernotovicz, Marguerite E. Bick- 
!ell, Amedeo Bondi Jr., Florence 
bourgeois, Mrs. Marguerite M. Bour- 
geois, Grace L. Boyden, Herman 
l^roudy, Alfred A. Brown, Louis J. 
Hush, Cornelius K. Cain, John Calvi, 
| Milton W. Cannon, Robert A. Caugh- 
jy, Mary A. Cawley, William J. 
L'lancy. 

George S. Congdon, Ellen R. Con- 
lery, Thomas F. Coughlin, Francis J. 
'rane, Chester E. Cross, Angelo F. 
PeAngelus, Augustino D. D'Ercole, 
)omenic DeFelice, Gordon B. Dennis, 
loward R. DeRose, Louis M. Di 
^arlo, Clyde W. Dow, Carl F. Dunker, 
Philip L. Ely, Emery A. Emerson, 
William B. Esselen, Anna A. Flynn, 
Wilho Frigard, Carl S. Gerlach, Dean 
sj. Glick, Myer Glickstein, Herman 
\J, Goodell, Mrs. Irene A. Goodell, 
Mildred F. Goldfaden, Harry K. 
[loiuk, Mary K. Gowdey, Elizabeth 
W. Hager, Constance H. Hall, Calvin 
g, llannum, Margaret B. Hartt. 

Edward W. Harvey, Eleanor W. 
Healy, Ernest R. Higgins, Walter H. 

lodge, Richard T. Holway, Louise 

i. Hopkins, Richard W. Hubbard, 
James F. Hunt, Benjamin Isgur, 
Kunice M. Johnson, Margaret M. 
Josko, James Kerr Jr., Elfriede 

llaucke, Myron H. Kollen, Richard 
Kopp, Karol Kucinski, Walter M. 

[ulash, Albert B. Landis, Lester H. 
I.cvine, Gothie H. Lewis, Melvin A. 
Lynch, Mary E. Lyons, Oscar Mar- 
golin, Edward Meyer, Robert S. 

leyer, Charles E. Meyers. 

Carroll P. Moore, Miriam Morse, 
,'illiam S. Mueller, George E. Nettle- 
Ion, Samuel Neuman, Alfred E. New- 
ton, Kenneth R. Newman, Julius 
lovick, Katherine L. O'Brien, Kath- 
arine M. O'Donnell, Ralph W. O'- 
liourke, Edward P. Ponte, Harry D. 
Watt, Francis C. Pray, Henry M. 
lienfro, Phillip Robinson, Florence M. 
Nmlnier, Ruth E. Scott, Stewart 
MM, Kevin G. Shea. 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 



3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hijili-clossed work 

Popular Prices 



Work Guaranteed 



NEW ARRIVALS 

Worsted tex Suits $37.50 Saxon weave Suits $32.50 

Michael Stern Suits $25 to $35 

Topcoats $19.50 to $32.50 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five years 



College Candy Kitchen 



S ARRIS RESTAURANT 

Excellent food . . . Large variety . . . Delightfully served. 

Reasonable prices. 
Nice place to come and bring your friends. 



CONCERT DRIVE TO 
END ON SATURDAY 



The campaign for membership in 
the Amherst Community Concert 
Association which is being conducted 
during this present week, will close 
Saturday evening at six o'clock. The 
headquarters of the campaign, as in 
former years, are located in the 
Jones Library, telephone 1268. Mrs. 
Stowell Coding is in charge at that 
place, and will answer all inquiries 
directed to her. 

On this campus the campaign is 
being conducted by a group of stud- 
ents under the direction of Mr. 
Goding. 



Syracuse Photos 
On Exhibition in 
Goodell Library 

From the Camera Club of Syracuse, 
a collection of thirty-one photographs, 
largely landscapes, has been secured 
by the Amherst Camera Club to 
make up the exhibit this month in 
Goodell Library. Winning photo- 
graphs in the Camera Club's monthly 
competition also will soon be placed 
on display. 

Feature position this month is held 
by a print appropriate to the season 
of the year entitled Autumn Land- 
scape, which pictures a field of corn- 
stalks. Three photographs by T. H. 
Schwelhe also occupy prominent places 
in the exhibit. One, Caught in the 
Net, depicting three fishermen un- 
loading their catch, has represented 
the Syracuse Camera Club at several 
salons. Another, White Birches, shows 
a striking contrast of light and shadow 
through a graceful group of trees. 

Another remarkable photograph is 
Going Down of the Sun by L. J. Mul- 
hame, which catches a last faint re- 
flection of shimmering light on dark 
waters. Poplars, also by Milhame, 
has an unusual texture and finish 
which give the picture a pleasing 
filmy appearance. 

J. O. Sprague is the largest con- 
tributor to this collection, having 
supplied six photographs. One is a 
lovely picture called The Gate- Keeper's 
Cottage and is placed in an outstand- 
ing position. 




THEAT?.? 



Matinee 2:30 Evening 6:30 8:30 



Fri.-Sat., Oct. 9-10 

SHIRLEY 
TEMPLE 



m 



"POOR 
LITTLE 
RICH 
GIRL" 

plus 
MARCH OF TIME 

Sports "Football" 

Technicolor Cartoon 

Our Gang Comedy 



Sun.-Mon.-Tues., Oct. 11-13 

The famous novel 

Now on the screen! 

"ANTHONY 
ADVERSE" 

with 

Frederic March 
Olivia I)c Haviland 

also 

Robert Benchley Comedy 

Mickey Mouse Cartoon 

Pathe News 

"Anthony Adverse" shown 

twice dailv at 3 and 7:35. 

Shows start 2:30 and 7 

No advance in prices! 



Affl-Thurs. 
14-15 



Warner Oland in "Chan at the Circus" 
Henry Fonda in "Spend Thrift" 



KOSS* COMMKNT 

"The fraternity pledging season 
just ended has been marked by a 
decided amount of indifference on 
the part of both fraternities and 
freshmen. Among all who are in-j 
terested in the future of fraternities' 
on this campus, it is necessarily 
their belief that certain radical 
changes must be made immedi- 
ately." 

"Next year should see, among 
other things, the institution of a 
second semester rushing season as 
well as definite means for cutting; 
down rushing expenses. A good 
fraternity man, when forced to, 
will admit that first semester 
pledging is wrong inasmuch as 
neither freshmen or upperclassmen 
are qualified at the time to judge 
their respective choices." 

Kenwood Ross, President, 

Inter fraternity Council 



Class Nominating Committees 

Prepare for Coming Elections 



STAFF MEMBERS TO 
TAKE NEW POSITIONS 



Two resignations from the faculty 
have been announced by the adminis- 
tration. Dr. Charles S. Cibbs, re- 
search professor of veterinary science 
since 1929, has left the college to join 
the l^ederle Laboratories at Pearl 
River, N. Y. A graduate of Mates 
College, Dr. Gibbs holds degrees from 
Yale and Michigan State. 

Dr. Paul D. Isham, instructor in 
the department of horticultural manu- 
factures, is leaving to affiliate himself 
with the Federal government in Wash- 
ington, D. C. in the department of 
food technology. 



FRATERNITY PLEDGING 

Continued from Page 1 

ere, David Searle, Samuel Shaw, Eric 
Stahlberg, John Osmun, Everett Spen- 
cer, Gerald Dailey, Richard Muller. 

Kappa Epsilon. Freshmen: Henry 
Barney, Robert Benemelis, Shirley 
Robbins, Daniel O'Connell, Fred 
Wright, Daniel Shepardson, Wilfred 
Shepardson, James Buckley, Edgar 
Slater; Donald Brown '39, Stanley 
Bozek '38. 

Phi Lambda Tim. Freshmen: 
Robert Bernstein, Melvin Chalfen, 
Al Kelfer, Melvin Reisman, Theodore 
Saltzman, Everett Shapiro, Sidney 
Siegal, Sidney Spungin, Bernard Tol- 
nick, Nathan Wilansky, Sidney Zuck- 
erman; Sam Orlen '39. 

Sigma Phi Epxilon. Freshmen: 
Carl Bennett, Philip Geoffrion; Philip 
E. Burgun '39, Harvey E. Burke '39. 

Phi Sigma Kappn. Freshmen: 
Emile Deneault, Francis Saunders, 
Robert Hanley, Frank Dalton, George 
Davenport, Ralph Hill, Richard Woy- 
tisek, Malcolm Harding, Everett Lang- 
worthy, Howard Wetherell, George 
Atwater, Douglas Cowling, Al Sulli- 
van; Ralph White '39. 

Lambda Clii Alpha. Freshmen: 
John Swenson, John Ingham, Freder- 
ick K. Hughes, Roger Brown, Arthur 
Howe; William Bullock '38. 

Tiictn Chi. Freshmen: Alan 
Smith, James King. James Payson, 
Howard Rudge, Franklin Davis, 
Harold Strauhe, Harold Storey, Wil- 
lard Foster, Arthur Noyes, Roger 
Morgan, John Serex, Francis Wing; 
Marcene Whit comb '39. 

<|. T. V. Freshmen: Robert 
Tlichter, Donald Shaw, Richard Blake, 
Frank Daley, Robert McCartney; 
Lawrence Harris '37. 



SPECIAL 
RIS TRIP TO BOSTON 

October 10 to 12 

Leave Saturday at 1 o'clock 
from campus. 

Return from Park Square at 
7 p.m. October 12 

Tickets at College Barber Shop 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Featuring Student Needs 
on M.S.C. Campus 

Luncheonette Soda Fountain 
Sunday Night Special 

WIN TIIK RADIO 

The Quink Ink Way 
Content clOMS Oct. 15 



24 Senior Cadets 
Are Promoted by 
R.O.T.C. Depart. 

Appointment of twenty-four Cadet 
Second-Lieutenants in the cadet regi- 
ment, R.O.T.C. Cavalry unit at this 
college, was announced this week by 
Lt.-Col. Applington. 

Senior Com missions 

The list includes Cadet Master 
Sergeant James F. Cutter, Cadet First 
Sergeants Anthony J. Nogelo, Ernest 
K. Davis, John J. Talinski, Alfred W. 
Bruneau, Cadet Staff Sergeants Fred- 
erick W. Whittmore, Jr., and Isadore 
Barr. 

Cadet Sergeants Arthur C. Avery, 
Robert A. Bieber, Louis A. Breault, 
Jr., Leroy F. Clark, Robert E. Couhig, 
Albert J. Gricius, Robert P. Holds- 
worth, Jr., Leroy K. Houghton, Jr., 
Allan S. Ingalls, John E. Landers, 
Wendell E. Lapham, Walter B. Mose- 
ley, David A. Peterson, Kenwood 
Ross, John Ruffley, Jr., Harvey G. 
Turner, Jr., and Richard C. Wildner. 
Junior i 'om missions 

Promotions and appointments of 
cadet non-commissioned officers from 
members of the junior class were also 
disclosed. Cadet Sergeants will be 
Cadet Corporals Marshall B. Allen, 
William B. Avery, Warren S. Baker, 
Jr., Robert D. Buzzee, Norman Clark, 
Clifford A. Curtis, Cyrus E. French, 
Richard C. King, Robert S. Lyons, 
Continued on Page 6 



At the first regular meetings of the 
four classes on October 1, nominating 
committees were either nominated or 
elected to bring in nominations for the 
offices to be Voted on at the next 
meeting. 

Seniors 

The seniors presented thirleen names 
to be elected for ■ nominating com- 
mittee. Those suggested were Dave 
Rossi ter, Helen Downing, Ted Thaeker 
Wendell Lapham, Ray Wyman, Robert 
Spiller, Anthony Nogelo, Walter Gur- 
alnick, Robert Couhig, Ed Bernstein, 
Byron Johnson, Bill Leiffaton, and 
Chick Cutter. 

A committee was also elected to 
investigate a college ring which could 
be used by all classes in the future. 
This committee consists of Anthony 
Ferrucci, chairman; Lucille Monroe, 
Carolyn Rogers, Ted Tacker, Austin 
Fisher. 

Juniors 

The junior nominating committee 
has not yet been appointed by the 
president but will consist of a repre- 
sentative of each fraternity and each 
sorority on campus and one non- 
fraternity and non-sorority member. 
Edith Thayer, Doris Jenkins, Herbert 
Brown and Fairfield t'arr were elected 
to the visiting committee in charge of 
ill members. 

Sophomores 

Richard I^ee, Frank Southwick, 
Francis Farren, William Howe, Eliza- 
beth Clapp, and Olive Norwood were 
elected by the sophomores to repre 
sent them on a nominating committee 
which will bring in nominations for 
the class offices at the next, meeting. 
Afebrile Booth, Donald Brown, and 
the treasurer were made a visiting 
committee. 

Fresh men 

Ten persons were elected by the 
freshmen to bring in nominations for 
offices. Those elected were Alan 
Smith, Robert Dunn, George Pitts, 
Ralph Hill, James Payson, Frank 
Dalton, I^ewis Norwood, William 
Foley, Harold Storey, and Ann 
Corcoran. 

A new committee of members from 
each class working in conjunction 
with the Dean's office will draw up I 
set of by-laws to govern all class 
elections and meetings in the future. 
The committee* is as follows: George 
Milne *37, John Hoar "Mi, Gordon 
Najar '.'19, and Elizabeth Reynolds '40. 



HYGBONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

TIIF CUT RATI STORK 

The Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. is the only cut rate drug 
store in town. We cut prices on all patent medicines, 
drugs, cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco, to the extent that 
we challenge comparison. Our cut rate policy is attended 
also on our modern and up-to-date soda fountain bar. Il 
is our privilege to call to your attention and impress upon 
you the word CUT RATE. It is a symbol of laving 
money in your own pocket book. It's wise to be thrifty. 



Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. 

THE CUT RATH STORK 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and 



Haberdashery 






TUB MASSAC III SKITS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, ItM 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

Co/fege Outfitter 



HICKKY-FREKMAN CLOTIIKS 

Hickey- Freeman is a young man's organization. 
No wonder their clothes are so smartly styleful. 



Debating Team May 
Schedule Long Tour 



A schedule which will take the 
team as far south as South Carolina 
has been tentatively arranged by the 
men's debating team, Albert S. Thom- 
as, manager, has announced. 

Under the proposed plan the team 
will engage in several debates on the 
way south, and others on the way 
back. If present plans are carried out 
it will be the longest and most am- 
bitious tour the team has undertaken. 



SOCIAL UNION 

Continued from Page 1 

He established the Beethoven Asso- 
ciation of New York in 1919 and has 
done much to further the understand- 
ing of modern music as well as of the 
classics. 

Some years ago he united with the 
late Ossip Gabrilowitsch, who died 
last year, to form one of the most 
successful piano duets ever to make 
appearances on the American concert 
stage. 



one presented last year, and is as gay 
as any of the works of these men. 
The setting is on a South Sea island. 
Mr. Stratton is working on the 
orchestration. The orchestra is an 
integral unit of this production and 
much will depend on that group's 
success. 

Eighty women have signed up for 
the glee club, 50 men for the men's 
glee club, and 25 for the orchestra. 



STOCKBKIIMiK FRESHMEN 

Continued from Page 2 

Shuster, Francis Simonich, R. Martin 
Smith, John J. Sloet, Joseph P. 
Spalding, Richard Sparks, Elizabeth 
Speirs, Frank M. Stone, Ralph W. 
Stone Jr., Raymond Surgen, Richard 
M. Taylor, Robert F. Tilley, Joseph 
Torchio, Edwin Treadwell, Ralph G. 
Tryon Jr., Victor Vellali, Frank W. 
Vincent, Derwood C. Wadleigh, Mari- 
on P. Watson, Edmund D. Wells Jr., 
Elliot A. Williams, Gilbert M Wright, 
Frank S. Yazwinski Jr., Michael Zak, 
Frank K. Zeise. 



Ml SIC A L CLUBS 

Continued from Page 1 

Irving was chosen chairman of the 
combined group; Barbara Keck, secre- 
tary; Bernard Kohn, stage manager, 
and Barbara Strode, publicity director. 
Each manager will choose an assist- 
ant from the junior class who will be- 
come manager in his senior year. The 
board will be composed of these six 
managers, three seniors and three 
juniors. The three clubs will work in- 
dependently as far as rehearsals are 
concerned, but will be easily combined 
as occasion arises for joint programs. 

Larger Operetta 

Utopia Limited, by Gilbert and 
Sullivan, is a larger operetta than the 



Tech 4. Goals Mass. State: Rodda 
3, Osley 2, Lyman 1, Podolak 1; 
Worcester Tech: McEwen 2, Holt 2. 
Substitutes Mass. State: Golub, 
Feinburg, Adams, Roberts, McKinney. 
Worcester Tech: Clark, Abel, Fraser, 
Stafford. Referee — Cummings. Time 
— 22m. quarters. 



SII'N KICKERS WIN 

Continued from Page 3 

play by his long punts, and his goal 
kicking was one of State's best offen- 
sive plays. Captain Joe Kennedy's 
play was hampered by a sore leg; he 
was substituted at the half. Out- 
standing for Worcester were McEwen, 
of course, and Holt. 
The lineup: 

Worcester Tech ro, Mudgett; ri, 
Holt; cf, McEwen; li, Pearson; lo, 
Wingardner; lh, Kay; ch, Hollick; 
rh, Wrobel; If, Ljunggren; rf, Law- 
rence; g, Bonim. 

Mass. Stmt* ro, Kyle; ri, Lyman; 
cf, Rodda; li, Osley; lo, Cain; lh, 
Buzzee; ch, Couper; rh, Kennedy; 
If, Conway; rf, Podolak; g, Turner. 

Score Mass. State 7, Worcester 



GRIDMEN LOSE 14-12 

Continued from Page 3 

jiowdoin. Hanley, Newman, re; 
Corey, rt; Ashkenazy, rg; Nicholson, 
Burton, c; Clapp, lg; Hepburn, 
Griffith, It; Fitts, le; Smith, Sawyer, 
qb; Karsokas, rhb; Reed, Molendy, 
Frye, lhb; Soule, Karakashian, fb. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Continued from Page 2 

Excursion 

The College Travel Service an- 
nounces an excursion to Boston over 
October 12th week-end. Busses will 
leave campus Saturday, Oct. 10 at 
1 o'clock and return from Park Square 
at 7 o'clock Monday night. Tickets 
may be had at the College Barber 
Shop in North Dormitory. 

Hist.-Soc. Club 

The first meeting of the History- 



Sociology Club will be held in Room 
102, Stockbridge Hall, Tuesday eve 
ning, Oct. 13 at 7 p.m. All member 
and others interested are urged to 
attend as there will be the election of 
officers and a discussion of a program 
for the group. 

Chi-in Club 

The first of a series of bi-monthly 
lectures and demonstrations .sponsored 
by the Chem Club will be held fhk 
evening at 7:30 p.m. at Goessmann 
Auditorium. Charles Wendell of Need- 
ham will give a demonstration of glass 
blowing. 

Prospective Chem majors are es- 
pecially invited as well as majors in 
other departments. 



MILITARY APPOINTMENTS 

Continued from Page 5 

Robert K. Morrison, and Cadets 
Davis W. Beaumont, Norman P. 
Blake, Herbert E. Brown, Frank A. 
Bros, Frank F. Carr, Edward W 
Czelusniak, William Eaton. 

Charles E. Elliott, Leland W. Hook- 
er, Richard R. Irving, Norman E. 
Linden, Robert D. MacCurdy, Donald 
S. McGowan, William C. Riley, Rich- 
ard W. Towle, and Floyd W. Townaley. 




V_Jiesterfield 



in 1936, Liccbtt & Myhus tobacco Co. 



. . . they're milder 
they have a mote pleasing taste and aroma 





A50flt 




Mpn 



VOTE 
TODAY 



Vol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1930 



No. 4 



Fernald Anniversary 
Exercises October 16 



Convention of Entomolog- 
ists to be held in Mem- 
orial Hall on that Date 
Under Auspices of Asso- 
ciates 



Tomorrow Massachusetts State Col- 
lege will celebrate the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of the beginning of the work of 
Charles Henry Fernald, one of the 
founders of economic entomology in 
this country and once a world author- 
ity in economic entomology. He died 
in Amherst in 1921. 

Annual Meeting Here 

Arrangements for observance of the 
event are being made by the Fernald 
Club of the college and the staff of the 
department of entomology. In recog- 
nition of Fernald's pioneer work, en 



PROF. BONN 
TO ADDRESS 
CONVOCATION 



Honored by N. H, 



To Give Several Talks In- 
formally During Visit 



Through the cooperation of a num- 
ber of eastern colleges and the Insti- 
tute of International Education, ar- 
rangements have been made for Prof. 
Moritz J. Bonn, distinguished German 
economist, to speak at Convocation, 
October 22, on a topic of international 
economic significance. 

Professor Bonn will be at the 




Bauer to Appear At 
Social Union Monday 



RIDING SHOW 
ON PROGRAM 
FOR DAD'S DAY 



college for three days, October 21-23. 
tomologists of the state department j A faculty committee under the chair- 



of entomology in Connecticut will 
hold their annual meeting here to- 
morrow. The group is headed by Dr. 
W. E, Britton. 

Speaking at the formal exercises of 
commemoration will be President Hugh 
P. Baker of M.S.C., and two noted 
former pupils of Dr. Fernald. They 
are: A. F. Burgess of Greenfield, 
Continued on Page 4 



New Play Selected 
By Roister Doisters 



The Roister Doisters have chosen 
"The Night of January 16" as the 
winter play for their first presentation 



manship of Dr. Cance has arranged 

the following program for him during 

this period. 

Wednesday, October 21 

3-5 p.m. Informal reception and tea 
at the Faculty Club for the com- 
mittee in charge of arrangements 
and a few invited guests. 

7 p.m. Address at the Farley 4-H 

Club House to the History and 

Continued on Page 6 



Robbers Steal $58 
At Theta Chi House 



Edward M. Lewis 
Former President of M.S.C. 

ATHLETIC FIELD AT 
DURHAM TO HONOR 
EDWARD M. LEWIS 



A sum of money totaling over $50 
was stolen from Theta Chi fraternity 
of the 1936-37 season, according to j ate Tuesday night or early Wednes- 
announcement from Professor Rand's J ^ ay morn j n g. The money was taken 



office. 

The play is a murder mystery drama 
which takes place in a crowded court- 
room. An innovation in the play is 
the selection of a jury from among the 
members of the audience, a situation 
which has not hitherto appeared in 
any of the Roister Doister presenta- 
tions. 

The officers of the association are 
•lohn Hoar '38, president; Lucille 
Munroe '37, vice-president; James 
Hobby '37, business manager; Henry 
B. Elkind '38, assistant business 
manager; Ray Moult '38, stage 
manager; Gordon Moody '37, elec- 
trician. 

Professor Frank Prentice Rand of 
I lie department of languages and 
literature will again serve as director. 



MATHERS SPEAKS 
AT NEXT VESPERS 



from the desks of several of the fra- 
ternity members. 

Those reporting losses are: Phil 
Haskins, a loss of $28; Marsh Allen, 
$18; Wilcox, $10; Linden $2; and 
Ryan, $2.50. 

The Amherst police are investigat- 
ing. 



Edward M. Lewis, former president 
of Massachusetts State College and 
president of the University of New 
Hampshire at the time of his death 
last Spring, was honored last Saturday 
when Lewis Field, new recreation area 
at the University, was dedicated in 
his memory. 

The official dedication of the new 
stadium and fields marked the end of 
three years of building progress fos- 
tered by the late president Lewis. 

Editorial Comment 

In commenting editorially on the 
event, The New Hampshire, student 
newspaper at the University, said: 

"Tomorrow the University of New 
Hampshire dedicates its new recrea- 
tional areas in memory of Edward 
Morgan I^ewis, late president of the 
University. For many years the prob- 
lem of providing greater recreational 
facilities for all the students had en- 
grossed the attention of President 
Lewis. Such a scheme on the scale he 
had planned was finally made possible 
Continued on Page 6 



Interfraternity Sing Also 
To Be Presented 

Plans for the tenth annual Dads' 
Day, which will be observed on Oct. 
24, are rapidly taking form. A change 
has been made this year in the usual 
program — the addition of the inter- 
fraternity sing. 

The program of events will begin at 
9 o'clock, when visits will be made to 
the various college departments. Fea- 
turing the morning program will be a 
demonstration of fancy riding and 
jumping by the R.O.T.C. seniors and 
juniors. From 11 until noon there 
will be an informal reception for the 
dads by members of the faculty and 
students in Memorial Hall. 

Complimentary tickets to the State 
vs. W.P.I, football game will be pre- 
sented to the dads as they register 
in the Memorial Building. 

Continued on Page 4 



Complete program as an- 
nounced consists of 11 
selections by well-known 
pianist 

Monday, October 19, is the date 
definitely chosen for the appearance 
of Harold Bauer, pianist, in the first 
Social Union program of the year. 

The concert program that he has 
chosen is as follows: 

1. Il.ii-iuti-l — S-t of piiCM 

(Selected .ind arranged by Harold Bauer) 
Oveituie 
Allemandc 
Sal.th tii'lr 
( niirante 
Piece 

Air with variation* 
J. Ptlhovtn s,, ">t' I '!'■ - 7 ' Men - (Moonlight) 
'.',. .u Ili-buasy The Sunken Cathedral 

bl lir. dim, * tpricdo in B minor 

<■) Schumann Novellelte in I) major, No. .i 
4. a) ScluilH-rt Impromptu in G flat 

b) Chopin S, h'-r/o in C sharp minor 

Mr. Bauer \s using the Baldwin piano. 

Harold Bauer was born and edu- 
cated in England, and began his 
musical career as a violinist making 
his first public appearance at the age 
of nine. It was later, on the advice of 
Paderewski, that he commenced hia 
study of the piano. 

Continued on Page 4 



M.S.C. News Service 
To Conduct Contest 



A "News Tip" contest to be con- 
ducted by the College News Service 
with the cooperation of the Collegian 
was announced today by Francis 
Pray, assistant college editor. A 
prize, as yet unannounced, will be 
furnished personally by President 
Baker. 

The contest will run through Nov. 
7 and may be continued if sufficient 
interest is shown. 

Rule* 

Rules of the contest are as follows: 
Continued on Page 4 



1 hatcher Hall Residents Worship Classics 

Through Large Donation by Mrs. James Storrow 



Again Mass. State students will be 
'Me to hear an outstanding person- 
ality at the Vespers Service on Sunday 
Bl 5 p.m. in the Memorial Building | by her, and several valuable pa.nt.ngs 

when Kirtlev F. Mathers, professor of 



Freshman bibliophiles 
Thatcher Hall now have 
haven of their own, tin- result of a 
gift of books from Mrs. James Storrow. 
The new library, to be known as the 
Storrow Memorial Library, comprises 
over 1356 volumes and includes his- 
tories, biographies, essays; books of 
poetry, philosophy, economics, travel; 
and Creek and Latin classics. 

Mrs. Storrow's total donation to 
the college includes the entire library 
from one of the private houses owned 



geology at Harvard University, will 
-peak upon "The Impact of Modern 
8< itnee upon Religion." 

Professor Mathers came into public 
hi dice recently because of his active 
opposition to the Teachers' Oath Law. 
Ph.D. from Chit-tigo 



and bronzes. No stipulation as to 
where the gifts should be placed. The 
administration decided to make an 
appropriate selection of books, and to 
place it in Thatcher Hall, calling it 
the Storrow Memorial Library. The 
remainder of books has been placed 
in Goodell Library. The art objects 
are now ornamenting rooms and 



living in college during its history. Librarian ' college. She became acquainted with 
a literary j Basil Wood, recalling previous liter- | it through her husband, the late 
ary grants to Massachusetts State | James J. Storrow, who was food ad- 
College, mentioned as the donation ministrator during the last war and 
earliest in his memory, the Thurber- who had as assistants several mem- 
Wilson gift of several years ago. This bers of the State College faculty; and 
was a gift of books botanical for the through her associations with a society 
most part, and highly prized by the , of English folk dancing which met on 
botany department. the campus for several succeeding 

The presentation by Marshall P. ' summers. She has long been known 
Wilder of several volumes of pomology | for her many philanthropic awards to 
and floriculture was another important various organizations. She was the 
addition to the shelves of the old donor of Storrowton, a model town 
library. The remnants of the library [ given to the Springfield Eastern States 
of former president of the college. Exposition. 

Mrs. Storrow has long been aj Author* Represented 

staunch and interested friend of the 

Several outstanding authors ;ire 

represented in the Storrow Memorial 



Community Concert 
List Now Complete 



The two remaining concerts in the 
1936-37 Community Concert series 
have been announced by the Amherst 
Music Committee following a meeting 
last Saturday evening. 

Ilifthi'st Percentage 

The Community Concert student 
campaign on the M.S.C. campus was 
the most successful in the history of 
Community Concerts and far exceeded 
even last year's record number. Massa- 
chusetts State College now has the 
highest percentage of student mem- 
bership in any of the two hundred 
associations in the United States and 
Canada. 

The artists who will come to 
Amherst are Frederick Jagel, leading 
tenor with the Metropolitan Opera 
Company of New York, and the Hart 
House Siring Quartet, which ap- 
peared here in a concert a few years 

ago. 

Last year. Jagel appeared at the 
Worcester Music Festival in a re- 
engagement and sang with the Detroit 
and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestras 
Continued on Page 4 



He received his B.S. degree from offices m t he various buildings of the 

"'nison University in 1909 and his campUfl 
I ID. degree from the University of 

ChiofO in 1915. Since 1911 he has °*»" "■•» ****** 

rved in many universities as in- The gift of Mrs. Storrow's ranks 

Continued on Page 6 with other large bequests to the 



INFORMAL SATURDAY 



At the Drill Hall from 8 to 11:30 
p.m. Admission 50 cents per 
couple. Come and celebrate a 
victory!! 



JOHN L WOOD '36 
STARS IN CAVALRY 



Library. Boswell's biography of 
Samuel Johnson will attract many 
readers, as will the Shakespearean 
works, the complete works of Charles 
Dickens, the Iliad of Homer, the 
essays of Charles Lamb and Matthew 
Arnold, the biographies of Morley, 
and the works of Tennyson and 
Milton to mention but a few of the 
1 excellent literary attractions. 



As ■ member of the Third Cavalry 
jumping team, John L. Wood, class 
of '36, has made a notable record 
since his graduation from Massachu- 
setts State College. Competing at 
Hartford two weeks ago, his team 
took seven blue, four red and three 
white ribbons, as well as a number of 
cups. This week the team is scheduled 
to jump at Montreal. 

Wood was a student officer in the 
R.O.T.C. cadet corps at this college. 
He was born in Boston and is a gradu- 
ate of the Moses Brown School. His 
major here was botany, and he was a 
member of Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



Aiidvs oaDiw i r n d 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TBUBSOAY, OCTOBKK 15, l*M 




Collegian 



•Sri 

/llbassacbuse 

Oflch l awwpspa of th* M»s»ch usetti Stsw « oB^tt. Published *»«ry Tlmr-diiy bjr thr ttoAnita. 

LOUIS A. RRKA1 IT '37 Kdilor-in-chicf 
FREDERICK L1NDSTROM "38, MSMltal Editor WALTER GURALNICK "37. Associate Editor 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Campus Athletics 

PHILIP B. SIIIEF -37. Editor JILIAN H. KATZEEE '38, Editor 

RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN *3S 

JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 ALERED M. SWIREN '38 

STANLEY A. FLOWER 38 Make-up Editor 

MAURICE TONKIN *S RAYMOND B. JORDAN -37 

MARY T MEFHAN '39 Stockbrldge Correspondents 

EMERY MOORE '39 RALPH HARRIS S'37 

ELEANOR WARD '39 GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 

THOMAS J. ENR1GHT 39 FlnanclalAd »l«er 

PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 
Faculty Adrtser 

DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 

BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37. Business Manager 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38. Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME '38 DONALD L. SILVERMAN ", 




SUBSCRIPTIONS t200 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPlES 10 CENTS 



Make all •rders payable to Tin IfaWitMstl CotUtHn. Id case ol change of address, subscriber 
will please aotlfy the business manager as soon as possible Alumni, undergraduate and laculty con- 
tributions ara sincerely encouraged Any communications or notices must be received at the Cotogtan 

osTice before o'clock. Monday e vening. . , . 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In Section 1103 
Act of October 1917. authorized August 20 

1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North 
Street. Northampton. Mass.. Telephone 654 



Hard Facta 

In an introductory psychology class 
the other day, the prof called upon 
one of the wise sophomoric intellects 
to differentiate hetween the brain and 
the mind. 

After a few seconds of deep deliber- 
ation, the soph responded in dulcet 
tones: 

"The brain is something concrete." 



Barefoot Boy 
Speaking of psychology, can 
anything he done for a I'msh who 
was seen making a nocturnal 
jaunt about campus in his stock- 
ing feet with his shoes tied around 
his neck? 



1035 Member 1936 

Ptesociated Golle6ide Press 

Distributor of 

Colle6iate Di6est 



I I 114 I 111 



But You Might M'ork Down to It 

We note with interest that one of the 
freshman aspirants to the Collegian 
states in his application that he would 
like to work up to a columnist. 

We take this opportunity of informing 
him that no one can work up to any 
columnist if the columnist sees him 
first unless said columnist has pre- 
ciously received disabling injuries from 
an admiring public. 



CAMPUS 
CALENDAR 

Thursday, October 15 

7:.'iO p.m. Hand uliL-.ir-.il. Meinipri.il Bldtj. 

gjOOpjo, Womea'i Glee Club. Stockbridg* 

Room 1U 
s :< m i p. mi. Archibald MacLelah, MusoiisJ 

II. ,11 
Friday, October 16 
Entomologists and Memorial Service, at 

Memorial] Hall 
K:00 p.m. Romtwlt for PmirlrVrTit Hub. 

Manorial Hall 
Saturday, October 17 

Fall meeting of Fed. .it Women's Class, 

li:(H) p.m. Football. R. I. State at M.S.C. 

s:(H> p.m. Informal. Drill Hall 

Supper Dance. Theta Chi 
Sunday, October 18 

(i.iiOa.m. Outing Club hike to Mt. Hay- 
stack 

5:00 p.m. Ve-sper services. Memorial Hall, 
Prof. Kirtly Mather, Harvard 
Monday, October 19 

8:00 p.m. Social I'nion. Harold Bauer 
Tuesday, October 20 

8:00 p.m. Social Union, Harold Bauer 
Tuesday. Oct. 20 

8:00 p.m. Men's Glee Club, Memorial Hall 
Wednesday, October 21 

8:00 p.m. Orchestra rehearsal. Mem. Blclg. 
Thursday. Oct. 22 

11.00 a.m. Convocation, Prof. Moritz J. 
Bonn, Economist, London School of 
Economics 

7:'AU p.m. Band. Memorial Hall 

8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club. Stockbridse 



Stockbridqe 



Freshmen Klect 

The class of '38 gathered and elected 
temporary officers. They are as fol- 
lows: H. T. Griffin, president; W. A. 
Nutter, vice-president; E. Pieper, 
secretary; R. McHardy, treasurer. 



Footballers Victorious 

The Stockbridge football team 
scored a decisive win over Nichols 
Junior College at Dudley, Conn, on 
Saturday. The score was 21 to 0. 
The next game will be played Oct. 17 
at the Vermont Academy. 



Announcements 



Fraternities Invite 

The two social clubs of the school, 
Alpha Tau Gamma and Kolony Klub, 
both extend invitations to all fresh- 
men and seniors to attend the "smok- 
ers" to be held this Thursday at 7:30 
at the club houses. 



Cross-Coun t r y 

The 1936 edition of the cross- 
country team has reported and is 
now training under Coach Derby. 
The squad is made up of about fifteen 
frosh and ten seniors. A good schedule 
is being planned by Manager Fife. 



FOR 1>A1>S' DAY 

Massachusetts State College is each year the center of ac- 
tivity for large groups of convening visitors. Each year the 
facilities of the college are made available to people who need a 
place at which to meet. The college is repaid for its kindness in 
that it is given a chance to show these groups just what sort of 
an institution M.S.C. really is. And during the years when the 
college is evolving from an agricultural institution into a state 
university, it is important that the people of the state see as 
much of M.S.C. as they can. 

Just which of our groups of visitors is most important to the 
college would be hard to say. The horticulturists have their big 
show, the recreation conference attracts perhaps the most widely 
spread group, the educators have their annual session, and there 
are many others. But of all the groups which make the campus 
their annual meeting place, none is so welcome, none pleases the 
college so much as does the group which is due on campus next 
week — our dads. 

Dads' Day is, and should be, a day when the college is thrown 
open to our fathers to give them a chance to live with us a day 
of college life. Instead of going home to dad for a week-end, we 
are bringing him to our college home to show him how we con- 
duct ourselves when we are away from him. It's important that 
we make the short visit a pleasant one for our dads. 

Dads' Day is, of course, a week from Saturday. Each dad 
has been officially invited by the college to attend. But that's 
not enough. No dad will feel welcome on campus that day unless 
he is personally invited by his son and daughter. 

We should like to see this Dads' Day be the best ever held at 
the college. Records are easy things to break, especially when 
the method of attainment is such a simple thing as writing a 
letter. So, add vour invitation to the college's now. And re- 
member, dad wants to come, but he'll feel out of place unless 
you ask him. 



Toujour* Ciai 

A discussion of some of North- 
ampton's finer dancing and trucking 
halls prompted one precocious young- 
ster to inquire: 

"How many 't's' are there in 
slumming, anyway?" 



Dull-Dazed 

As returns from the Mascot-for- 
Mass. -State contest come pouring into 
the office, six editors, a janitor, and a 
house mother are kept busy day and 
night tabulating results. As returns 
now stand, the janitor reports that 
the bull has scored a clean sweep. 

If the freshman who proposed the 
bull will step forward, we will accept 
his humble apology for having given 
us a bum steer. 



Roosevelt-for-President 

There will be a meeting of all 
students interested in the formation 
of a "Roosevelt-for-President" 
club, at the auditorium of the 
Memorial Building, Friday eve- 
ning at 8 p.m. 



Kolony Klub 

Kolony Klub has elected a new 
house manager in the person of 
Donald Mercer. 



As we look back upon the disappoint- 
ing Mass. State-Conn. State game, we 
can see what the trouble was. -Just a 
case of too much Conn beef. 

Too much space has been given to 
freshman antics. How about the 
senior who rose bright and early at 
6 a.m. the other day to read a play | 
for an English quiz at 8 a.m. So 
interested did he become in the play 
that 8 a.m. found him still reading, 
too late to take the quiz. 



Bauer's Kecital 

For the students who are interested, 
Mr. Stratton will give an explanatory 
talk on Harold Bauer's program to be 
presented at the Social Union on 
Monday evening, October 19. At 11 
a.m. on Monday morning in the 
Memorial Building, Mr. Stratton will 
talk about the music Mr. Bauer will 
play and will demonstrate with the 
piano and the phonograph. 



Outing Club Hike 

The first open hike to be offered by 
the Outing Club this season is sched- 
uled for Sunday, October 18. It will 
be to Mt. Haystack. The bus will 
leave the East Experiment Station at 
9 a.m. and will return at 6 p.m. 
Lunches are to be carried by the 
hikers. 

Those wishing to go should sign the 
list posted in the library before 
Saturday noon. A charge of $1.00 for 
members and $1.50 for non-members 
will be made for the transportation. 
In case the bus is overcrowded, prefer- 
ence will be given to the members. 



Index Staff 

There will 



be a meeting of the 
Continued on Page 6 



ANOTHER RALLY 

Tomorrow evening Adelphia will hold another rally, this time 
as a pep-up before the Rhode Island football game. It's our 
business to make the last exhibition of college spirit on campus, 
the bonfire held three weeks ago, something insignificant in 
comparison. 

The Collegian commented editorially two weeks ago about the 
last bonfire. Nothing more need be said about that. The coming 
rally means something different. It means that the students have 
to make an effort to get out there and do a little yelling before 
they forget that they have a football team to support and a 
college to identify themselves with when a game is in progress. 

We ask the presidents of all fraternities and sororities to order 
all members out of the houses tomorrow evening. We ask the 
proctors of the dormitories to eject students from their rooms, 
forcibly if need be. If Tom Moran were more than one person 
we would ask him to engage in the round-up. 

Seriously, though, we ought to have a crowd at tomorrow 
night's rally. We expect that several Rhode Islanders will be up 
for the game, and we'll be doing something if we show them what 
school spirit really is. 

LEWIS FIELDS 

This week's Collegian carries an announcement of the dedi- 
cation of a new recreational area at the University of New 
Hampshire, named Lewis Fields in honor of the late president of 
New Hampshire, Edward Morgan Lewis. Massachusetts State 
feels that this memorial has a strong attachment to this institu- 
te n for Edward Morgan Lewis wr.s also our president. So may 
WQ of Massachusetts State add a word of well wishing to the 
many students of the University of New Hampshire for the 
beneficial hours that will be theirs on B recreational center dedi- 
cated to the memory of a man beloved of us both. 



Thing* began to look M though 
the freshman co-eds with all their 
suitcase-lugging Mere going to 
leave us last Friday. Then sud- 
denly Joe College popped up with 
,i bright idea. Glancing at the 
sea of male frosh hats about him. 
he chortled: What no red-caps? 



ADELPHIA BONFIRE 

TOMORROW NIGHT, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 
AT SEVEN O'CLOCK 

Lieut. Col. Aplin&toii, Principal Speaker 

COME AND RAISE A RUMPUS 

Help to encourage the team on the night before the 
Rhode Island game. 



COLLEGIAN STRAW VOTE 

On Coming Elections 



PURPOSE: 

PLACE: 

TIME: 

ELIGIBLE TO VOTE: 



To obtain expression of student opinion on coming 
national and state elections. 

Collegian office, Room 8, Memorial Building. 

1 to 9 p.m., tomorrow, Friday, Oct. 16. 

All students enrolled in four-year course. 



With the two-fold purpose of polling the opinion of the State campus on th« coming 
elections through the college paper, and of cooperating with other colleges and the Daily 
Princetonian to express national collegiate opinion, the Collegian is conducting a student 
straw vote this afternoon. 

Evervone is urg«»d to vote at the polls in the C-tlhgian office. Room 8, Memorial Build- 
ing They will he open from 1 this afternoon until 9 tonight. The cooperation of the entire 
student hody is necessary to mike the poll a success. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS CO LLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1936 



S PORTS 




Soccer Team Makes 



Only State Win, 2-1 



BriggHmen Will Meet Williams 
and Yale Next 



State continued its winning ways 
00 the soccer field by defeating 
Connecticut State College, 2-1, at 
Storrs last Saturday. Taking advan- 
tage of every opportunity, the States- 
men completely outplayed a strong 
Nutmeg team, and for the sixth 
straight year upheld the tradition of 
never having lost to Connecticut. 

Again the sophomores exhibited 
their calibre by scoring all goals. 
Tom Lyman opened the scoring early 
in the first period. Child of Connecti- 
cut tied it up in the second period. 
Charlie Rodda put the winning marker 
across in the third period. Two would 
be goals were eliminated when Don 
Osley scored after the whistle was 
blown ending the third period, and 
when a Connecticut man scored right 
after the closing signal. 

The lineup: 



PAGEANT DAY 
SET FOR FRI. 
OCTOBER 23 



si < i iiiii 



Musk. State 






Conn. State 


Menjamin 




g 




Shapiro 


Podolak 




rf 




Fromkin 


Conway 




If 


(Capt.) Hayes 


Kennedy (Capt.) 


rh 




Child 


Couper 




ch 




Goldring 


Keinburg 




II. 




Kelley 


Cain 




ro 




Shipley 


Lyman 




ri 




Dunne 


Rodda 




cf 




Janiga 


Osley 




li 




Beloin 


(iolub 




lo 




Spence 


Score — Mass. 


State 2, 


Conn 


. State 1. 



State opens its home season next 
Wednesday when the soccer team 
meets the big blue of Yale. Unde- 
feated U. S. intercollegiate champions 
last year, the Elis are out to repeat 
this season. The State game, how- 
ever, will be no easy set-up. Though 
Coach Briggs is noncommital on the 
subject whether State will be out to 
win or just keep the score down, Yale 
will meet one of the strongest soccer 
teams in campus history. It may be 
just the Yale game that will keep 
State from emulating the undefeated 
record of the 1931 team. In its only 
game to date Yale has defeated 
McGill 5-0. 

The soccer team will continue its 
road trip meeting Williams at Wil- 
linmstown next Saturday. In its open- 
ing game Williams defeated Hamilton 
3-0. Last year the sons of Eph de- 
feated State 3-1, with Johnny David- 
son accounting for two of the goals. 



With the date for the Women's 
Athletic Field pageant set for October 
23, an elaborate program of speakers 
and pageantry is under way according 
to Professor Adeline Hicks. The 
pageant, which will be a part of the 
formal dedication of the new field has 
been arranged so as to include prac- 
tically every co-ed on campus as well 
as the orchestra and band. 

The dances in the program have 
been arranged so as to represent the 
progress of the work on the field by 
seasons. Dances will be given by the 
sororities and as well as by the girls 
of the freshman and sophomore classes. 

Speakers for the occasion will in- 
clude Dr. Dorothy Ainsworth, direc- 
tor of Physical Education at Smith 
College, Mrs. Lottie A. Leach of Wal- 
pole, and President Hugh P. Baker. 



HARRIERS LOSE 
23-32 TO N. V., 
RUN R. I NEXT 



We are reprinting the Mascot con- 
test blank below for the benefit of 
those who have not as yet taken time 
out to leave one with the sports editor 
at the Collegian office in Memorial 
Building. Results so far have been 
interesting to say the least. This week 
we announce a cash prize of three 
dollars for the winning suggestion sent 
in in writing. Judges of the contest 
will represent the Division of Physical 
Education, the Associate Alumni and 
the Student Senate, so get busy and 
let's see what the State mascot will be. 



Statesmen Shut out By 
Conn. State Team 13-0 



GRIDMEN PLAY 
RHODY HERE 
ON SATURDAY 



Rhode I si:, i id First to Meet States- 
men on Home Fitdd 



Fencing 

The attention of the student body 
has been called to the new fencing 
classes which are being organized this 
year by several of the students who 
are interested in the sport and are 
qualified to instruct those who attend 
the classes. For those who are inter- 
ested in fencing and would like to 
learn this sport, an excellent oppor- 
tunity to do so without the necessity 
of purchasing equipment is being 
offered. The instructors for the group 
of interested students, male and 
female, has been volunteered by 
Donald Brown '39, Bud Hooker '38 
and Sid Rosen '39, a former member 
of the M.I.T. fencing team. Would 
be fencers should be at the Physical 
Education Building next Wednesday 
night at 7:30 in any sort of a gym 
outfit. 



STARTING LINE-UP AT STORRS 



Conn. State 

I'anciere, le 
Helmboldt, It 
Fox, lg 
flrosch, c 
Sladkow, rg 
Lenich, rt 
Jance, re 
Holcomb, qb 
Thompson, lhb 
S< hwolski, rhb 
Hayuk, fb 



Mass. State 

re, Lapham 

rt, Linden 

rg, O'Brien 

c, Rossiter 

lg, Bernstein 

It, Gray 

le, Moseley 

qb, Hauck 

rhb, Filipkowski 



lhb, Czelusniak 

fb, Niden I Sampson (M). 



Led by Hawk Zamparelli, national 
junior 10,000 meter champion, the 
Northeastern harriers defeated the 
State cross-country team 23-32 at 
Franklin Park, Boston, last Saturday. 
It was the first State loss to North- 
eastern in four years. 

Following Zamparelli, who was never 
headed, came Captain Johnston of 
Northeastern. Pickard and NeJame 
took third and fourth places for Mass. 
State, respectively. Ingram of State 
had a struggle with Tatel and Higbee 
of Northeastern all the way, but they 
both nosed him out in the final 
quarter-mile. Ingram placed seventh, 
and Little, Sampson, and Beaumont 
took eighth, tenth, and eleventh 
places for State, respectively. 

The State harriers will encounter 
the M.I.T. engineers here this Satur- 
day, between the halves of the Mass. 
State-Rhode Island State football 
game. Last year State nosed them 
out 26-29. They have two dangerous 
runners in Guerke and Cooper. Guerke, 
New England intercollegiate mile 
champion, lost to Ray Proctor of 
State for first place by a tenth of a 
second in last year's meet. Cooper 
placed fourth in that meet. 

The summary of the Northeastern 
meet: 1st, Zamparelli (N); 2nd, 
Johnston (N); 3rd, Pickard (M); 4th, 
NeJame (M); 5th, Tatel (N); 6th, 
Higbee (N); 7th, Ingram (M); 8th, 
Little (M); 9th, Grant (N); 10th, 



Prince of Wales Club 

We may be losing our Aggie tradi- 
tion, but the military majors are sure 
making a "back to the soil" move- 
ment. Every day the members of the 
movement increase with the result 
that we are this week forming a 
"Prince of Wales Club" for the 
benefit of the fallen riders. The 
following charter members have al- 
ready been nominated and chosen. 
Election of officers will be announced 
soon. Charter members of the M.S.C. 
"Prince of Wales Club" are: 



** Louis Breault 
* * * Bob Couhig 

* Ken Ross 

* MacCurdy 
*** Charlie Elliot 

* Norm Linden 

* Norm Blake 
Pledge— Bob Bieber 



off Powder 

off Powder 

off Dan 

off Shaw 

off Ceres 

off Salter 



Resplendent in their new uniforms, 
the Caraway men will open their 
home season next Saturday afternoon 
against Rhode Island State on the 
Alumni Field. Following the game 
last Saturday in Connecticut, there 
will probably be several changes in 
the State line. 

In the game against Rhody last 
year, the M.S.C. eleven reached new 
heights in excellence of play, and 
rolled out a 7-6 victory over a for- 
midable and tricky Ram combination. 
The score was little indication of the 
superiority of the Taubemen over the 
Rhode Islanders, and in this game the 
Statesmen showed a great running 
back in Emil "Powerhouse" Koenig. 

The Rhody edition this year ought 
to give the Maroon and White some 
serious opposition. So far this season 
the Rams have the impressive record 
of three wins and only one defeat. 
The one tumble which the team suf- 
fered was at the hands of Brown, who 
felled the Rams to the tune of 7-6. 
Last week, playing an untested Jumbo 
set-up, the Rhode Islanders captured 
another 7-0 win. The visitors boast a 
defense which has allowed their oppo- 
nents to cross their goal line but once 
in four contests. 

The Rhode Island line-up will prob- 
ably be as follows: DiOrio le, Di 
Petrillo It, McCarthy lg, Robertshaw 
c, Allen rg, Tallman re, Wright qb, 
Messina lhb, Albanese rhb, Mudge fb. 
On the State team Cone, who saw 
service last week for the first time, 
will probably get the call again in the 
Rhode Island game. 



Asterisks (*) represent standing of 

members. 
*♦* excellent 
* * good 
* passing 



Team Hampered by Loss of Capt. 
Kossiter and Sievers 



Playing their second game of the 
season last Saturday at Connecticut 
State in Storrs, the Statesmen were 
defeated for the first time since 1926 
by an up-and-coming combine of 
Nut meggers. The score was 13-0. 

The Statesmen were almost power- 
less during the first half, the ball 
being constantly in Massachusetts 
territory. A 60-yard march down the 
field in the first quarter featured by 
the smart line running Posner, Con- 
necticut halfback and Bayuk, full- 
back, placed the ball in scoring 
position. Posner made the first tally 
on a line buck and Bayuk's rush for 
the extra point failed. 

The linework of the Statesmen dur- 
ing the first half was poor, due to the 
loss of guard Sievers, injured during 
practice and center Rossiter, who was 
dazed during the first few minutes of 
the game and had to be taken from 
the game. 

Only a few minutes after the first 
tally, a long pass from Scotty Thomp- 
son, flashy halfback, to O'Grady, end, 
brought the ball to the visitors' two- 
yard line. Scarchuk plunged over for 
the touchdown and Thompson place 
kicked for the extra point. 

The second half was all Mass. State. 
Smart running by Niden, Towle, 
Czelusniak and Filipkowski reversed 
the situation of the earlier half and 
Connecticut territory felt the impact 
of the flashing cleats. The Massa- 
chusetts pass attack which functioned 
well against Bowdoin a week earlier, 
fell before Connecticut interceptions 
and the Statesmen were driven from 
scoring positions many times through 
balls tossed into the hands of the 
home team. 

The Statesmen, toward the close of 
the game had the ball way down on 
the Connecticut three-yard line only 
to lose it on downs. M.S.C. 's last 
scoring position failed when a pass 
from Niden was intercepted by Panci- 
era, who ran the ball down to his 
20-yard line. 



Contest Blank 



Date 



Vour Name. 



Vour Amherst Address 



Interfraternity Sports 

In the first week of interfraternity 
football competition, several teams 
revealed themselves as high-powered 
scoring machines. Last Tuesday night 
Phi Sigma Kappa defeated Phi Lambda 
Tau 32-7. Sigma Phi Epsilon routed 
Alpha Gamma Rho 38-14, and Theta 
Chi defeated Kappa Sigma 38-24 on 
Wednesday and Thursday nights, 
respectively. 

The schedule for the coming week 
is: Thursday: Alpha Sigma Phi vs. 
Non-Fraternity at 7:15, Alpha Gamma 
Rho vs. Q.T.V. at 8:15; Wednesday: 
Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Lambda Chi 
Alpha at 7:15, Kappa Epsilon vs. 
Theta Chi at 8:15; Thursday: Alpha 
Epsilon Pi vs. Non-Fraternity at 7:15, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. Q.T.V. at 8:15. 



I 



Vour Clans. 



Vour Suggestion 



CALENDAR 



Football. Saturday, Rhode 

Island State at M.S.C., 2 p.m. 
Soccer. Saturday, Williams at 

Williamstown. Wednesday, Yale 

at M.S.C. 
Cross Country. Saturday, 

M.I.T. at M.S.C. 





6ERALP 
NUESSLE, 

$0 DAKOTA STATE, 

CAN HOLD 4 

GOLF BALL? 

IN U19 MOUTH 

AT 0NC*/ 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 554 



Northampton, M 






T1IE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1936 



TilK mass AC 11 1 suns COLLBQ1AN, rill W8DAY, octobkk l"». 193<$ 



Bear Steak Delicacy to Appear on the 

Mountain Day Menu; Date Indefinite 



Students are expectantly awaiting 
the development of plans for that 
annual fall event, Mountain Day. 
A faculty committee headed by J. 
Harry Rich has charge of the affair. 
Mr. Rich, who is assistant profes- 
sor of forestry when not getting ready 
for Mountain Day, stated that the 
date has definitely been set for Octo- 
ber. In other words, he wouldn't talk. 
Meet Mt. Toby 

Mountain Day, of course, is not 
purely a "hurrah boys" gathering. 
First, it enables the students to be- 
come better acquainted with each 
other and with the faculty in an in- 
formal manner. Then, too, it enables 
students and faculty alike to become 
acquainted with the college reser- 
vation, Mt. Toby, and with the wild- 
life of the mountain. 

The faculty committee reported 
that there would be plenty to eat 
for one and all. Bear steak will fea- 
ture the menu. Reports state that 
there is a bear roaming around Mt. 
Toby now, and the committee pro- 
mised that it will be caught in time 
for supper on Mountain Day. It 
is rumored that there will be coffee 
and cider and apples and such. 
A Tradition 

Mountain Day, by the way, is 
rather a tradition at Mass. State. 
Students have long been accustomed 
to spend a day on Mt. Toby, but in 
1923 the custom became official when 
the then new fire-tower was dedi- 
cated. In 1929 the annual event was 
called off but after a strenuous cam- 
paign by the student body, was re- 
established in 1932. 

In those days, Mountain Day was 
an all-day affair, opened by the ring- 
ing of the chapel bell at 7:30 a.m. 
Students rushed pell-mell to the 
stables to claim a horse, while the 
others hopped on bicycles, cars, wa- 
gons, and busses for the journey. 
Various contests, such as wood-chop- 
ping, pie-eating, and tree-climbing 
featured the day topped off by an 
address by Dean Burns of Missouri. 
Waiting for the Bell 

An ever welcome relief from classes 
and a method of fostering good-fel- 
lowship among students is the annu- 
al Mountain Day. Just think, no 
classes all afternoon, and no study- 
ing all night. If your profs catch you 
unprepared the next day, a sufficient 
excuse is, "I went on Mountain Day." 
You'll get a zero just the same. So 
listen for the sound of the gong some 
noon next week — or the week after. 



Eleven students have entered the 
competition for the Business Board of 
the Massachusetts Collegian. There 
are six members of the freshman class 
and five members from the class of 
1939. 



NEWS TIP CONTEST 

Continued from Page 1 

Students having suggestions for 
news stories dealing with student or 
college activities which are suitable 
for the daily press will enter these 
suggestions in the contest by writing 
their "news tip" on a sheet of paper, 
signing it, and depositing it person- 
ally or by mail at the College News 
Service in South College or at the 
Collegian office. If time is a factor 
phone it into the College News Ser- 
vice. Suggestions should be addressed 
to the News Tip Contest, Collegian 
office, or College News Service. 

It will not be necessary to send in a 
complete story. The "tip" is sufficient, 
and awards will be made upon the 
basis of its interest as news. 
No Kestrietion** 

There are no restrictions upon the 
type of material acceptable so long as 
it deals with some newsworthy college 
activity. Student doings, unusual 
facts, interesting personalities which 
might be written up, odd experiences, 
research findings, new equipment, 
faculty accomplishments — all these 
and many more are acceptable. 

The contest is not open to student 
correspondents of daily papers. 
Judges 

Judges for the contest will be the 
director of the College News Service, 
and James W. Burke, and G. O. 
Oleson, extension editors. 

Names of the winners and those 
winning honorable mention will be 
published in the Collegian and in the 
daily papers. 



COMMUNITY CONCERTS 

Continued from Page 1 

and with the Chicago Civic Opera 

Company. 

The Hart House Quartet presented 
a concert tour in Canada and Nova 
Scota last year and was recalled to 
Toronto twelve times. A very brilliant 
concert was presented at Town Hall 
in New York. 

The complete list of concert artists 
to appear here at Amherst this year 
consists of Albert Spaulding, Jesus 
Maria Sanroma, Frederick Jagel, and 
the Hart House Quartet. 

SOCIAL UNION 

Continued from Page 1 

In America in 1900 

In 1900, after a successful tour of 
the continent, Mr. Bauer made his 
first appearance in America as guest 
artist with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, and has since continued to 
appear with this organization. 

He established, in 1919, the Beet- 
hoven Association of New York, and 
he has done much to further the un- 
derstanding of modern as well as 
classical music. 



Managers Announce Constitution of 

the Newly Organized Musical Clubs 



DADS' DAY 

Continued from Page 1 

The interfraternity sing will take 
place at 7:15 in the evening. The 
fraternities have been requested to 
sing two numbers, and will be limited 
to sixteen men each. Judges for the 
singing will be Mr. Helming, Dr. 
Fraker, and Professor Prince. The 
winner of this event will receive credit 
toward the Interfraternity Cup. 

The intersorority council has ap- 
pointed Lucille Monroe to supervise 
the skit to be given by the combined 
sororoties. 

The committee arranging the Horse 
Show includes: Leroy Clark '37, 
chairman; Robert Bieber '37, Ken- 
wood Ross '37, Robert Couhig '37, 
and Frederick Whittemore '37. 



FEBNALD CELEBRATION 

Continued from Page 1 
entomologist with the Federal Moth 
Control laboratory, who has carried 
on the work of gypsy moth control 
begun by Dr. Fernald, and Dr. E. 
Porter Felt, director of the Bartlett 
Tree Research Laboratory, Stamford, 
Connecticut. 

Dr. Charles P. Alexander, professor 
of entomology at the college is in 
charge of arrangements. 

Founded Ent. Department 

Dr. Fernald founded the depart- 
ment of entomology at M.S.C. in 1886 
and established a reputation as one of 
the great pioneer teachers of ento- 
mology in the United States. He in- 
augurated the fight against the gypsy 
moth in 1889 and was known as a 
world authority on several families of 
M icrolepidoptera . 




EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 



Electric Wiring Supplies 
Electric Grills, Casseroles 
Electric Coffee Pots 
Electric 1 -Burner Stoves 
Electric Lamps and Bulbs 
Philco and R.C.A. Radios 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Matinee 2:30 Evening 6:30 8:30 

FrI.-Sat., Oct. 16-17 

Jane Withers in 

"LITTLE MISS NOBODY" 

— other feature — 

Paul Kelly Stuart Erwin 

Florence Rice in 

"WOMEN ARE TROUBLE" 

Plus -Musical — Others 

Sun. -M.ni.- I ik«s.. Oct. 18-20 

Joan Crawford, Robert Taylor 

^Lionel Barrymore, Franchot Tone^ 

in 

"THE (.ORCiEOUS IILSSY" 

Also Musical, "New Shoes" 
Cartoon Pathe News 



Wed.-TliurN.. Oct. 21-22 

Pat O'Brien in 
"CHINA CLIPPER" 

— second big hit— 

Henry Fonda, Pat Patterson in 

"SPENDTHRIFT" 



The board of managers of the 
newly organized Combined Musical 
Clubs announced the constitution for 
the group this week. It is printed in 
full below. 

Preamble 

We, the managers of the glee clubs 
and orchestra, form this board of 
managers in order to facilitate the 
fulfillment of the activities of the 
above mentioned clubs. We deem 
this organization an expedient mea- 
sure to provide greater efficiency, co- 
operation, and achievements among 
the three clubs. 

ARTICLE I 

Orga ii izu t ion 

Section 1. The organization shall be 
called the Board of Managers of the 
Combined Musical Clubs. 

Section 2. Membership on the Board 
shall consist of the manager of the 
women's glee club, men's glee club, 
and orchestra together with one assist- 
ant manager from each. 

Section 3. Voting power shall be 
restricted to the managers but assist- 
ant managers may be permitted a 
voice in the discussion. 

ARTICLE II 

Selection of Manager** 

Section 1. Assistant managers will 
be automatically advanced to the 
position of manager in their senior 
year unless expulsion from position is 
deemed advisable by General Mana- 
ger and Business Manager of Aca- 
demics Activities Board and Coach of 
the clubs. 

Section 2. Assistant managers will 
be chosen in their sophomore year 
during the second semester to serve 
during their junior year as assistant 
manager, at the discretion of the re- 
tiring manager and assistant manager 
after suitable competition. The selec- 
tion must meet with the approval of 
the director and men mentioned in 
Article II, Section 1. 

Section 3. Beginning in the year 
1937-1938, all managers should be 
members of the senior class. 

ARTICLE III 

Officers of the Board 

Section 1. Officers of the Board 
shall be elected annually at the first 
fall meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Section 2. The officers shall consist 
of Chairman, Publicity Manager, Sec- 
retary, Stage Manager, and such other 
officers as are necessary. 



Section 3. The officers shall be 
elected by majority vote of the board. 
In case of deadlock, the deciding vote 
shall be cast by General Manager or 
such person appointed by him. Assist- 
ant managers may vote on these 
officers. 

Section 4 (a) The duties of Chair 
man shall consist of presiding at all 
meetings. He shall have the power of 
calling meetings and cancelling meet- 
ings. 

(6) Duties of Stage Man 
ager will consist of Handling all pro 
ductions of the combined groups. 

(c) The Secretary shali 
handle all correspondence and record 
the proceedings of meetings both 
regular and special. 

(rf) The Publicity Mana 
ger will handle all manner of public 
communications. 

ARTICLE IV 

Meeting* 

Section 1. Meetings shall occur at 
least once a week or more often, at 
the discretion of Chairman of Board. 
Regular meetings shall be announced 
publicly for benefit of students at the 
beginning of each year. 

ARTICLE V 

Finance*. 

Section 1. All expenses and profits 
incurred by the Board of Managers 
will be shared equally by the three 
clubs. 

Section 2. The Board of Managers 
shall have no control over the inde- 
pendent treasuries of the three clubs. 
The funds of each club shall come 
under the direct and sole control of 
the manager of that club. 

ARTICLE VI 

Amendments 

Section 1. Ammendments to this 
constitution shall be made by a 
unanimous vote of the board. 



PREVIEWS 

Joan Crawford reigns over the at- 
tractions at the Amherst Theatre this 
coming week in The Gorgeous Hussy. 
As the woman who mixed herself into 
the political life of Andrew Jackson, 
Miss Crawford surrounded by a galazv 
of male stars, turns in a fine perform- 
ance. However, we'll wager that the 
plum goes to Lionel Barrymore for 
his interpretation of the redoubtable 
Andy Jackson. 



IIANLfNItCM 
IIMilD4NI 

A complete restaurant service 
from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

Sunday Night Supper 

A pleasant stopping place for a 

sandwich or glass of beer 

after the theatre. 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Featuring Student Needs 

on M.S.C. Campus 

Luncheonette Soda Fountain 

Sunday Night Special 

WIN THE RADIO 

The Quink Ink Way 
Contest closes Oct. 15 



New poetry by local poets 
"Spell Against Time" 

by David Morton $2.00 

"Stand with Me Here" 

by Robert Francis $1.75 



Sheet Music, latest hits 

Filing Cards & Cabinets 

Box Files 

Personal Christmas Cards 
Samples now ready 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hi£h-rlnswed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



NEW ARRIVALS 

Worsted tex Suits $37.50 Saxon weave Suits $32.50 

Michael Stern Suits $25 to $35 

Topcoats $19.50 to $32.50 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothe* for College Men for forty-five years 



College Candy Kitchen 



SARRIS 

This is Hot Chocolate weather. It's deliciousl 
PASTRY SALTED NUTS CANDY 

Excellent quality 



IEW GRADUATE ASSISTANTS AND 
INSTITUTIONAL FELLOWS NAMED 



Names of thirty graduate assist- 
ing and institutional fellows at the 
allege have been announced. 

The list is as follows: Roland F. 

leckefi B.S., Graduate Assistant, 

| rtment of Education; John W. j 

itavicz, B.S., Institutional Pel* 

Department of Horticultural 

U.uiufactures; Marguerite E. Bick- 

•II, M.S., Graduate Assistant, De- 1 
., rtment of Economics; Amedeo 
londi, B.S., Graduate Assistant, De- 1 

•.rtment of Bacteriology and Physi- j 
logy; Louis Bush, B.S., Institu- 
tional Fellow, Department of Physi- 
cal Education; Cornelius K. Cain, 

S., Graduate Assistant, Depart- 
ment of Chemistry; Chester E. Cross, 

.S., Graduate Assistant, Depart- 
ment of Botany; Clyde W. Dow, 
5.L.I., Graduate Assistant, Depart- 
ment of Languages and Literature; 
'arl S. Gerlach, B.S., Graduate As- 
|istant, Department of Landscape 
Architecture; Elizabeth W. Hager, 

.S., Graduate Assistant, Depart- 
ment of Home Economics; Con- 
Itance H. Hall, B.S., Institutional 

eilow, Department of History and 
ociology; Calvin S. Hannum, B.S., 
Institutional Fellow, Department of 
education. 

Edward W. Harvey, B.S., Graduate 
distant, Department of Bacteri- 
ology and Physiology; Eleanor W. 
lealy, A.B., Graduate Assistant, 
)epartment of Languages and Lit- 
erature; Eunice M. Johnson, B.S., 
Institutional Fellow, Department of 
3<>tany; Elfriede Klaucke, B.S., 
[iraduate Assistant, Department of 
Agronomy; James Ken, Jr., B.S., 
Institutional Fellow, Department of 

antjuages and Literature; Myron H. 
iollen, A.B., Graduate Assistant, Dep- 
art ment of Chemistry; 

G. Harry Lewis, B.S., Graduate 
distant, Department of Chemistry; 
(ohert E. Meyer, A.B., Institutional 
•Vllow, Department of Chemistry; 
t'harles E. Meyers, B.S., Graduate 
Assistant, Department of Land- 
L-ape Architecture; Carroll P. Moore, 

.S., Graduate Assistant, Depart- 
lent of Education; Alfred E. New- 
Ion. B.S., Graduate Assistant, De- 
triment of Chemistry; Catherine 
O'Brien, B.S., Graduate Assist- 
ant in Nutrition; George R. Pease, 

.S., Institutional Fellow, Depart- 
ment of Chemistry. 

Harry D. Pratt, B.S., Graduate 
Assistant, Department of Entomolo- 
tv. Philip Robinson, B.S., Graduate 

distant, Department of Education; 



BARSELOni'S CAPE 

|CE CREAM LUNCHES 

SMOKES 

ferving n quality glnss of ItKKK 

5.1 1 l.i ii lino's Ale 

Hampden Cream Ale 

Bonded Wines 



Honor Founding 

of Constitution 



do*e& flews 



Mr. Verbeck has been appointed 
chairman of a Sesquicentennial com- 
mittee chosen to celebrate the found- 
ing of the Constitution of the United 
States. The other members of the 
committee are Colonel Applington, 
Mr. Rand, Mr, Neet, Mr. Cance, and 
Mr. Wood. No definite plans have 
yet been formulated for the coming 
celebration. 



Bauer at First of 
Fine Arts Concerts 



The first in a new series of Fine 
Arts offerings will open next Tuesday, 
October 20, at 4:30 o'clock in Memo- 
rial Hall when Harold Bauer, world 
famous pianist, will appear before a 
small group of faculty and students, 
Stowell Goding announced today. 

Admission will be strictly limited 
and tickets may be obtained at Wilder 
Hall from Professor Waugh. This 
appearance of Mr. Bauer will be in 
addition to his Social Union appear- 
ance Monday night. 

The Fine Arts Series, explained by 
Professor Waugh, chairman of the 
Fine Arts Council, will run 19 to 20 
weeks through the college year. The 
series will consist of talks, music, and 
picture shows, combining in one 
definite and continuous program the 
artistic attempts which formerly have 
been offered by various college de- 
partments. 

Audiences will be limited for many 
of the events and those interested 
should contact Professor Waugh im- 
mediately. 



Sitjiim Belli C'lii 

On October 21, ■ tea is to be given 

at the Abbey. 

This Saturday, alter the Rhode 
Island game, there will be a coffee 
dance given by the juniors at the 
sorority house. 

Last week-end Dorothy Corcoran, 
Helen Reardon, Barbara Davis, Helen 
Bruns, Lorraine Noyes, and Elva 
Britton visited the sorority. 

l'riscilla Bradford has charge of 
dancing for the dedication of the 
womens' athletic field. 



NEW INDEX ALL PHOTOGRAPHY; 
NO ART WORK OR MAIN THEME 



Phi Zvtii 

Miss Ruth Henshel, of Smith Col- 
lege, visited Phi Zeta last week-end. 

Miss Ruth Wood '37 is at home, 
sick. 



Florence M. Saulnier, B.S., Institu- 
tional Fellow, Department of Lan- 
guages and Literature; Kevin Shea. 
B.A., Institutional Fellow, Depart- 
ment of Horticultural Manufactures; 
Nelson P. Stevens, B.S., Institu- 
tional Fellow, Department of Geo- 
logy; Max E. Turner, B.S., Gradu- 
ate Assistant, Department of Pom- 
ology. 



Many new pieces of 

Kensington Ware 

A quality gift 
at reasonable prices. 

Does not tarnish or fingerprint 

miss Cutler' $ 61ft Shop 



I in. I. <l. i Delta Mu 

The members of Lambda Delta 
Mu are pleased to announce the 
acceptance of Mrs. Harold P. Stewart 
as patroness to the sorority, to 
succeed Mrs. Herbert E. Wat kins. 

Several alumnae visited at the 
sorority house over the past week-end. 
They were Mildred Hovey '35, Rosa- 
mond Shattuck Schreiter '35, Betty 
Barr '35, and Betty Wheeler '34. 



Brown Speaks at 
Last Convocation 



Trustees to Visit 
Mt. Toby Saturday 

During the forenoon of Saturday, 
October 24, ■ group of trustees of the 
college will visit Mount Toby under 
the guidance of the personnel of the 
Forestry department. 

Weather permitting, an outdoor 
luncheon will be held for the board on 
the mountain. Trustees in attend- 
ance have been invited to the Rhode 
Island State game. 



H. P. HOOD DAIRY 
SCHOLARSHIPS TO 
TWELVE STUDENTS 



PIPES 



300 Styles 

A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER «n,l 
STATIONER 



25c to $12.50 

17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
Work called for and delivered Telephone 828 



Rollo Walter Brown, widely known 
lecturer, addressed the seventh Schol- 
arship Day Convocation upon "The 
Romance of Reing a Student." Mr. 
Brown evoked such a vigorous burst 
of applause at the conclusion of his 
speech that he was obliged to ack- 
nowledge it with a bow after he had 
taken his seat. 

"What becomes of college students?" 
asked Dr. Brown at the beginning of 
his talk. He asserted that in his own 
experience he found that out of a high 
school class consisting of over fifty 
students only six attained a fruitfull 
interior life. 

Remedy 

He attributed this condition to a 
lack of enthusiasm and romance in the 
lives of most people. As a remedy for 
the sterility of life he suggested that 
studentH learn how to observe things, 
and that they fix permanently in mind 
those things or experiences which are 
of interest to them. 

"Genius," said Mr. Brown, "is a 
combination of the enthusiasm of 
youth with the wisdom of age." 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



The Hood Dairy Scholarships for 
the fiscal year 1936-19.37, each for 
fifty dollars, have been awarded to 
each of four boys in the three upper 
classes. The complete list follows: 

Class of 1937 Haskell S. Tubiash, 
Karol Wisnieski, I^emuel Osborne, 
Leroy F. Clark. 

Clnss of 1938 William B. Avery, 
Frank W. Kingsbury, Russell E. 
Smith, Stanley H. Wiggin. 

Class of 1939 — George Brody, 
Richard D. Elliot, Leo D. Fay, 
Everett Roberts. 



OFFICERS OF BOTH 
UPPER CLASSES TO 
BE SELECTED SOON 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 




Mass. State 
students nre 
invited to our 
store for the 

latest in 

riding tog* 

and 

sportwetir. 



We stock breeches, riding hoots. 

Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



The nominating committees of the 
junior and senior classes have been 
announced following elections held ;it 
class meetings last Thursday. 

For the seniors. Helen Downing, 
Robert Couhig, Dave Rossiter, ('hick 
Cutter, and Wendell Lapham will 
select names for the offices to be voted 
on in the near future. 

Phyllis Nelson, Ruth Wood, Betty 
Scase, Harry Blaisdell, Ralph Ingram, 
William Lonergan, Carl Bokina, .John 
Dunlop, Irving Binder, Bernard Kohn, 
Dave Beaumont, Phil Haskins, Ver- 
non Coutu, Medrick Beloin, Robert 
Rustigan, Jesse Kinsman, Martha 
Kaplinsky, Marion Shaw, are the 
members of the junior nominating 
committee. 



A completely revamped and mod* 
ernietic Inde* will greet the eyes of 

the Massachusetts Stale College stu- 
dent populace when it makes ils 
annual public ;ippc;i ranee in the 
early part of next semester, accord- 
ing to announcement from Mitchell 
F. NeJame '38, business manager of 
the college year book. 

This new issue will be a modern, 
up-to-date year book in every sense 
of the word. The ancient and out- 
moded idea of a particular central 
theme, which was the former byword 
in bygone huh'xrn, will be discar- 
ded in the 1937 edition in favor of 
the general theme, "student life on 
the campus." 

No Drawings 

The art work will be all photo- 
graphy work, eliminating the hither- 
to-popular but sometimes imagina- 
tive hand drawings. The opening 
section, an entirely new one, will be 
devoted to campus views. 

The contracts for the printing have 
been awarded to the Burbank Print- 
ing Company of Worcester; the How- 
ard-Wesson Company of Worcester 
will do the engraving, and the (Jreber 
Studios, of Springfield will again do 
the photography work. 

Senior Pictures Taken 

The taking of senior pictures start- 
ed two weeks earlier than it did last 
year, beginning on October 14; and 
the editors are asking the seniors to 
give their full cooperation so that the 
pictures may not delay the plans for 
pulling out the 1 ndix several weeks 
earlier than it appeared last year. 

The staff of the 1937 Index is plan- 
ning many more inovations. 



Awards Six Students 
New Scholarships 

According to Dean William Mach- 
mer, the college has been assigned, for 
the first time six full Travelli scholar- 
ships. The scholarships are drawn on 
the Charles Irwin Travelli fund, and 
will be awarded to students who are 
needy of financial assistance, and 
whose grades are high enough to 
place them on the honor roll. Recipi- 
ents of the scholarships for this year 
are Marjorie CopelaJtd '39, Alexander 
Miller '39, Herbert E. Brown '38, 
Eleanor Brown '38, and Robert (lage 
'38. 



IIYCJEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

TIIK C IT RATE STORK 

The Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. is the only cut rate drug 
store in town. We cut prices on all patent medicines, 
drugs, cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco, to the extent that 
we challenge comparison. Our cut rate policy is extended 
also on our modern and up-to-date soda fountain bar. It 
is our privilege to call to your attention and impress upon 
you the word CUT RATE. It is a symbol of saving 
money in your own pocket book. It's wise to be thrifty. 



Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. 

THE COT RATE STORK 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEC.IAN, THURSDAY, o< IDItllt 15. ItM 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



HICKKY-FRKEMAN CLOTHES 

Our Fall line of Hickey-Freeman clothes is highly indi- 
vidualized in Fashion, Fabric and finish. . . The values 
exceptional ! . . . The prices moderate. 



LEWIS FIELD 

Continued from Page 1 
by the realization in the part of the 
Federal government that a great 
national emergency existed, by the 
fine cooperation of Federal and State 
governments and the Alumni associ- 
ation and the unremitting labors of 
officials of the University. 

Keg mi in 1933 

"The construction work on the 
fields was begun late in 1933, and 
winter and summer the work went on. 
Employment on the fields gave many 
students, who would have otherwise 
been forced to leave, an opportunity 
to work and remain in college. The 
undergraduates are grateful for the 
opportunity which was accorded them. 
Many of the alumni have worked 
directly on the construction, and all 
of the alumni have aided generously 
by contributions of time, funds and 
effort. 

"As Homecoming Day alone, to- 
morrow would be a happy occasion. 
When Homecoming is combined with 
the formal opening of the new athletic 
fields for which everyone has labored, 
it is with the greatest pride and joy 



that all join tomorrow in the exercises 
which will bring to completion the 
greatest building project ever under- 
taken at this university." 

BcMt Track in Now Eiiglund 

Included in the $218,000 sports area 
are six fields for football, soccer, or 
lacrosse, four baseball diamonds for 
alternate use with the practice fields, 
what has been described as one of the 
best running tracks in New England — 
a one-quarter mile cinder track en- 
circling the football field and includ- 
ing a 220-yard straight-away, besides 
pits and runways for jumping and 
vaulting — 20 tennis courts at the 
north end of the fields, a concrete 
stadium which will seat 5000 spectators 
for track meets, football games, and 
field events, and concrete hasehall 
field bleachers seating 1750. 



of the freshman cross-country team. 
All freshmen who aspire to this posi- 
tion must see Coach Derby or George 

! Brody in the Physical Education 
Building at 4:30 within the next few 

' days. 



Whoever is chosen will make all 
scheduled trips. 



New Pledge 

Vern W. Gilmore was omitted on 
the list of Alpha Gamma Rho's 
pledges and that of Robert Sheldon 
was an error. 



NOTICES 

Continued from Page 2 

entire Index staff in the Index office, 

Friday, October 16 at 7 p.m. 

Cross-Comitry Miiiia&ci whip 

There is an opening for managership 



I ii(« tiiiiI ioii.il KebitioiiN Club 

A special lecture will be given by 
Professor Moritz Bonn, German econ- 
omist and lecturer, for those students 
who are interested in international 
relations in the Farley 4-H Club 
house at 7 p.m. next Wednesday 
evening. The student body is cordi- 
ally invited by the International 
Relations Club to attend. 

V< i omp ini^l Wanted 

All those who wish to try out as 
piano accompanist for the Men's Glee 
Club please see Mr. Stratton at the 
Memorial Building or call Bernie 
Kohn (8940) as soon as possible. 



Band Reh our.siil 

The Band rehearsal will be held this 
week in Stockbridge Hall, tonight, 
Thursday, at 7:30 p.m. It is necessary 
that all members be present. Friday, 
at 4:30, there will be a marching drill 
with instruments on the north end of 
the athletic field. In case Mountain 
Day comes on Friday, marching drill 
will be held Saturday at a time to be 
announced. 



MATHERS AT VESPERS 

Continued from Page 1 
structor and professor of geology, 
paleontology, and physiography. He 
has held the position of professor of 
geology in Harvard University since 
1927 and has been head of the Har- 
vard Summer School since 1934. 

Professor Mathers is chairman of 
the editorial board of the Scientific 
Book Club and is associated with 
numerous scientific organizations. He 
is the author of "Science in Search of 
God" and "Sons of the Earth." He 
has also contributed to such periodi- 



cals as The Atlantic Monthly. 
Informal DiMCUKwion 

After the service Professor Mat! 
will preside at an informal discus.- < 
in the main lobby of the Mem. Bit 

PROFESSOR RONN 

Continued from Page 1 

Sociology and others who may 
interested. 

Thursday, October 22 

11 a.m. Convocation address. 

12 m. Cabinet luncheon at Drar 
Hall. 

4 p.m. Informal talk in the lounge 
Phi Sigma Kappa to students 
Economics, History and Sociology! 

6:30 p.m. Supper party at the Faculty 
Club for Social Science faculty at 
invited guests. 

Friday, October 23 

8 a.m. Informal talk in Room 114 
Stockbridge to Professor Cauldw< 1 
class in Government (History) andl 
to as many others as the room nfl 
accommodate. 

3 p.m. Reserved for informal coi 
ferences with students and faculta 
in the men's faculty room of GoodJ 
ell Library. 




M\ead any statement 
about Chesterfield cigarettes 

We tell you what they are made of — mild, 
ripe tobaccos. We tell you that we use 
on Chesterfield pure cigarette paper. 

We tell you that Chesterfields are 
carefully manufactured. 

We suggest that you try Chesterfields and 
find out how mild they are and what a 
pleasing taste and aroma they have. 

A great many cigarette smokers will 
tell you that Chesterfields satisfy— 
give them what they want in a cigarette, 

Liggett 8c Myers Tobacco Co. 



a*ax Xtzcto 




CURRENT 
EVENT 



Dad's Day 




U. A. C. Library. 



(Mepn 



OU rSTANDtNG 

I \ KNT 



llauer nt 
Suciul I iiinii 



Vol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTORER 22, 1936 



No. 5 



Plans Completed To 
Greet Dads Saturday 



| Attendance Expected to 
Reach New Record; 
Riding Show, Football 
Game Head Program 

Indications point to a record-break- 

ling attendance at the celebration this 
Saturday of the tenth annual Dads' 
Day. A varied program, featuring a 
riding show, a football game, and the 
interfraternity sing, has been care- 
fully arranged by the committee in 

| charge. 

Activities of the day will begin at 

1 9 o'clock, when the dads will make a 
tour of the campus and its various 
buildings. At 10 o'clock there will be 
an exhibition of fancy riding and 
jumping by the seniors and juniors of 
the R.O.T.C. An informal reception 
will be given the dads by students and 
members of the faculty in Memorial 

I Hall, from 11 until noon. 

As they register in the Memorial 

I Building, the dads will receive compli- 
mentary tickets to the football clash 
between W.P.I, and State. The Wor- 
er eleven, smarting from its de- 
feat at the hands of Connecticut 
State, will be out to regain prestige 

land the game promises to be bitterly 
contested. During the halves six 
stalwart freshmen will pit their com- 
bined strength against six sturdy 
sophomores in the six man rope pull. 
At 7:15 in the evening, the annual 
interfraternity sing will take place in 
Bowker Auditorium. The singers will 
judged on the basis of harmony, 
pitch and tone, diction, ensemble, dy- 
namics, and appearance. Each fra- 

Continued on Page 6 



CHAIRMAN 




LEROY F. CLARK '37 
Head of the Dad's Day Committee 

FORMAL GARDEN 
TO BE FEATURE 
OF H0RT. SHOW 



Mountain Day Held 
On Ideal Fall Day 

More than two hundred members of 
l lie student body and faculty attended 
| the annual Mountain Day outing to 
Mi Toby last Tuesday afternoon. 

The widely-publicized "hear steaks" 
[made their annual appearance but 
not in their usual form. They ap- 
peared, however, in a form that 
M.S.C. could easily recognize in the 
Familiar guise of the old-fashioned, 
health-destroying, tasty hot dog. 

One by the village clock found a 
horde of students assembled at the 
Kxperiment Station awaiting 
Continued on Page 6 



\FRESHMEN WARNED 
\BY ADMINISTRATION 



A sharp contrast in the theme of 
this year's Hort Show on the Am- 
herst game weekend to the natural- 
istic presentation of 1935 is promised 
by Walter J. Hodder, chairman of the 
student committee. 

Parterre Garden Feature 

A low, formal design will prevail 
throughout and the central feature 
will be a Parterre Garden. This de- 
sign will be developed by the use of 
formal hedges and terminal features 
of statuary. 

The feature this year will be lo- 
cated in the center of the cage; the 
plan has been designed so that the 
whole show will appear as a single 
unit not as several incongruous and 
separate features. The exhibits, 
whether commercial, student or de- 
partmental, will be so located that 
they will not only set off the separate 
exhibits to best advantage, but also 
make for unity and balance in the 
show. 

Continued on Page 6 



TO DEDICATE 
NEW WOMEN'S 
FIELDFRIDAY 

Program Includes Pageant 
Of Field Construction 



The program for the dedication of 
the new women's athletic field, to be 
held on Friday afternoon, at 2:30 in 
the field just west of the cage, is to 
consist of three parts: The Dedication, 
The Pageant of Field Construction, 
and the Sports Review. 

Mrs. Leach to Speak 

The principal speakers are to be 
President Baker; Mr. Paul Edwards, 
head of the W.P.A. project of Mass- 
achusetts; Mrs. Lottie A Leach from 
the Trustees and Advisory Council; 
and Dr. Dorothy S. Ainsworth, head 
of the physical education department 
at Smith College, Professor Adeline 
S. Hicks, who is to introduce them, 
announced today. 

The pageant part of the program 
is in charge of student leaders of the 
W.S.G.A., W.A.A. and of each soror- 
ity under the supervision of Profes- 
sor Adeline Hicks. The pageant will 
be a detailed portrayal of the work 
on the field in the form of dances. 
Exhibition in Sport* 

The sports review is under the su- 
pervision of Miss Ethel W. Blatch- 
ford, instructor in physical education 
and member of the W.A.A. Exhibi- 
tions in sports for which the field will 

Continued on Page 6 



Landon, Lodge, Haigis 
Win In Student Poll 



RESULTS 

(a) President 

Men Women Total 

Landon 222 146 368 

Roosevelt 166 46 212 

Thomas 12 10 22 
Lemke 6 17 

Browder 3 3 

Col v in 10 1 

(b) Senator 

Lodge 325 174 499 

Curley 63 17 80 

O'Brien 14 8 22 

Gray 1 1 

Communist 10 1 

(c) Governor 

HaigiB 298 152 450 

Hurley 101 42 143 
Lewis 11 

Communist 10 1 



GERMAN STUDENT 
GROUP PRESENTS 
NEXT SOCIAL UNION 



Notices calling attention to the 
penalties for setting Area and 

l( 01) state propel^ have been ! 
; I by Superintendent Armstrong 

!l i" Grounds Department following ! 
ipta by freshmen living in That- | 
" ' Hall to set fire to brush on the 
h'H behind the dormitory. 

though dampness of the wood I 
'lowing rains over the weekend pre- 
ted the (ire from doing any dam- 
possibility of the entire hill j 
■urned over, and of all trees ' 
hill being destroyed, caused 
lings to be posted. The brush 
1 h <- burned after the first snow. 
Target practice from the windows 

Continued on Page 2 



Trustees Here to 
Attend Dedication 



The college trustees will make a 
special two-day visit to the campus 
tomorrow and Saturday. Friday's 
program includes attendance at the 
dedication of the women's athletic 
field and special meeting. Saturday 
morning they will make a journey to 
Aft Toby and in the afternoon attend 
the Worcester Tech football game. 
The Mass. State College Women's Ad- 
visory Council,, composed of promin- 
ent women from all sections of the 
State, will also visit the campus to- 
morrow to attend the dedication. 



Through the medium of the Social 
. Union, unusual entertainment will be 
presented on the campus when The 
Young Artists Group (Spieleinung) of 
Germany, consisting of twelve young 
men and young women who sing and 
play ancient instruments, arrive here 
Tuesday, October 27. 

Students at the Academy of Msuic 
at Berlin, the group is touring the 
eastern part of the Linked States. 
Their aim is, besides bringing their 
music to this country, to become ac- 
quainted with America, the country 
and the people. 

This young artist group started 
, back in 1921 and organized for the 
purpose of discovering new ways 
which would give a more sincere and 
convincing interpretation to the old 
masterpieces of music. The instru- 
ments which are used are made from 
specifications used by the masters of 
the past centuries and from ancient, 
patterns. 



Harold Bauer, Pianist, Is Revealed as Musician, 

Student, and Philosopher During Two-Day Stay 



For the first two days of this past 
week the college was visited by Harold 
Bauer, artist, philosopher, student, 
and authority. 

Arriving on Monday morning. Mr. 
Bauer attended the music dam held 
on that morning, as all good music 
students should. In connection with 
the lecture on the program which u.<< 
to be pn sented at the Social Union, 
Mr. Bauer spoke and illustrated his 
brief talk with demonstrations on the 
piano. The presence Of the (Teal 
pianist at the class wis a surprise 
and was appreciated to the extent 
that students asked him to play some 
selections on the piano tor the benefit 
of the music class. 

Brilliant Recital 

In the afternoon, he was presented 
to the members of the faculty at I tea 
and reception at the President's 
House. And in the evening, of course, 
the Social Union was held, a brilliant 
recital of music and piano technique. 
Mr. Bauer is universal! v considered 



O 19J6, Liocrrr & Mrins Tobacco Co 



as the foremost technician of the piano 
and is called "the musician's musician." 
Printing musical pictures of scenes and 
people on the minds of the audience, 
Mr. Bauer displayed complete mastery 
Of the piano and of music. One mem- 
ber of the audience described his play- 
ing as "something like | cool summer 
broece blowing through a fertile field 
covered with ripe grain." 

On Tuesd.i> morning, Mr. Bauer 
Naked to see the library and Carnegie 
Collection of Music which is located 
in the library. And in the afternoon 
he paid a visit to the various depart- 



CONCBRT DATES 

Dates of Community Concerts 
to be presented in Amherst this 

vear are as follows: 

- 

Albert Spaulding, November 23; 
San Roma. January 19; Hart' 
House String Quartet, March 17; | 
and Jagel, April 27. 



ments and research laboratories where 
his pertinent questions displayed great 
curiosity and knowledge in matters 
of scientific and agricultural interest. 
Relief in Interrelation 
Throughout his visit, he expressed 
i -irong belief in the interrelation of 
music and the other arts in a general 
education, especially in the relation- 
ship with other subjects, such ai his 
tory, literary and artistic Batten, 
and sociology and economics, with 

special reference t<> the history <>) 

civilization. 

"The music of the people represents 
the temperament of the people," Mr. 
Bauer said; "it is the means of ex- 
pression." 

In the morning music class Harold 
Bauer confessed he rather liked music 
and went on to state that it is definitely 
related to the various sciences. "Sound 
is the presentation of an organic whole 
which goes through various experiences 
and changes; music is the shape of 
Continued on Page 6 



Students Break Away From 
Party Lines in Both Nat- 
ional and State Election 



That The Grand Old Party will re- 
turn to control in both national and 
state politics was the prediction of the 
State students when they favored 
Landon, Lodge and Haigis in the 
campus political poll conducted by the 
Collegian last Friday. 

While Landon had only slightly 
more than a 3-2 majority over Roose- 
velt, the state Republican office seek- 
ers won in overwhelming landslides, 
Lodge's plurality over Curley being 
more than 6-1, and Haigis over Hur- 
ley, over 3-1. Very few ballots were 
cast for candidates other than those 
of the two major political parties. 
Roosevelt Gains Over 1932 

Inferences of the results are many. 
When compared with the Collegian 
presidential poll of 1932 a decided 
break away from Republican stand- 
ards is seen, for while Hoover polled 
100 votes more than Landon, Roose- 
velt gained 80 votes over the 123 bal- 
lots cast for him four years ago. In 
the time interval Thomas dropped 00 
votes, from 117 to 22, proof that lib- 
erals inclined to the left are support- 
ing Roosevelt. While the men gave 
Landon but a 369S majority, the co- 
eds were with him, 3-1. 

Party Line* Broken 

Statistics show that the students, 
particularly Republican, are breaking 
away from party lines in both nation- 
al and state politics. Haigis, Repub- 
lican gubernatorial candidate, received 
82 votes more than Landon. The dif- 
ference of <">•'! votes cast for the i>emo- 
ctatic candidates for governor and 

Continued on Page 2 



Jitney Players to Be 
At Social Union 



The complete list of Social Union 
programs for the entire college year 
has now been rel. a -. <l. The program 
follows: 

Tuesday, October 27, Guenther 
School Students; Saturday, December 
12, Don Cossacks; Saturday, January 
0, Bay State Revue; Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 13, John Muholland; Friday, 
March 10, Mass. State Musical Clubs; 
Friday, April !♦, Jitney Player- 



TEA DANCE AFTER 
AMHERST BATTLE 



After a most ■UCCetsfttl Informal 
neld last Saturday evening in the Drill 
Hall, and dtte to the farther luccem 

of two afternoon bouse part it- which 

were h>i(i <»n the campus Immediate* 
ly after the Rhode Island game, in 
the Theta Chi and th<- Sigma Beta 
Chi boutee, the Informal Committee 

announces that a tea dance will be 
held in the Drill Hall from 4 p.m. to 
7 p m. after the Amherst game on 
October 31. 

David Rossiter, chairman of the 
committee has engaged the music of 
Kd. I'etrucelli from Westfield for the 
afTair. This same orchestra will play 
at the Kappa Sigma house in the eve- 
ning. 






TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1936 




/Iftassacbi^eni* Collegian 

Official newspaper of tbe Massachusetts State College. Published every Thursday by the students. 



LOUIS A. RREAULT '37. Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK '37. Associate Editor 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Campus Athletics 

PHILIP B. SHIFF '37. Editor JULIAN H. KATZEFF '38. Editor 

RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 

JAMES S. WALDMAN "37 ALFRED M. SWIREN "38 

STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 Make-up Editor 

MAURICE TONKIN '38 RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37 

MARY T. MEEHAN '39 Stockbrldfie Correspondents 

EMERY MOORE '3S RALPH HARRIS S'37 

ELEANOR WARD '39 GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 

THOMAS J. ENRIGHT '39 Financial Ad »Uer 

PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 
BUSINESS BOARD 
KENWOOD ROSS '37, Business Manager 
CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37, Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr. 
WILLIAM B. FERGUSON "38. Subscription Mgr. 
Business Assistants 
WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 
MITCHELL F. NEJAME '3 8 DONALD L. SILVER MAN '38 

SUBSCRIPTIONS *2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPlES 10 CENTS 

Make all orders payable to 7 hi Umssethusitts CoUttian In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager as soon as possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
tributions ant sincerely encouraged. Any communications or notices must be received at the Collegian 
ssnce before 9 o'clock. Monday evening. 




Nomination for official mascot: the 
crimson zebra that chases many a 
student home from Hamp of a Satur- 
day night. 



Enter, d as second-class matter at the Amherst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate of 
postage provided for In Section 1103 Act of October 1917. authorized August 201918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press, 82 North Street, Northampton, Mass., Telephone 554 



1936 Member 1937 

Plssocided GoUe6ide Press 

Distributors of 

Golle6iate Di6est 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 

■420 Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 



Chicago 
Los Angeles 



Boston • San Francisco 
Portland • Seattle 



I I 114 I 111 

THE POLL 

The Collegian this week carries the results of the recent politi- 
cal poll. We wish to state that the attitude of the students in 
regard to this project was gratifying to the paper. 

The poll was conducted in such a manner that the students 
would have to take an interest in voting if it were to be a success. 
The Collegian did no canvassing. Voters came of their own vo- 
lition to Memorial Hall and voted in a manner comparable to 
the regular polling of votes. Each vote meant the desire of some 
student to express his current political opinions. 

The results of the poll are accurate indications of student 
feeling in that each voter was checked off college monitor lists, 
no person being allowed to vote more than once. If the poll had 
been conducted in convocation, there would have been no way of 
telling just how many students voted how many times. 

The number of students voting was indicative of growing 
student interest in things political. Over six hundred students, 
voting voluntarily, when last year a convocation poll on a cam- 
pus subject polled less than this number is a certain indication 
that the coming election is being watched with considerable 
interest by students of this college. 

It was also noted during the tabulation that a minimum of 
nonsense appeared on the ballots. Only thirty-three single votes 
bore evidence of attempted humor and in no case did a whole 
ballot have to be thrown out. 

As to the nature of the results, they were, in all cases, ex- 
pected. Student political opinion in this section of the country 
is overwhelmingly Republican. 

It should be understood that the results in no way reflect 
the opinion of the Collegian. The paper, under the present 
regime, will never express itself politically. 

Within a couple of weeks, the Collegian will carry the total 
results polled in the group of colleges in the East invited by the 
Daily Princetonian. Massachusetts State College was a part of 
this student poll. 



TIIK VICTORY MARCH 

Last week's football game bore good evidence of a new 
college spirit as regards cheering. There was plenty of good 
yelling to spur the players on over that muddy field, and you 
who attended that game will be in error if you don't think it 
was appreciated. 

The cheer leaders are to be commended on the way they 
handled the cheers. The new idea of cheering individual players 
who have made spectacular plays while those players were still 
on the field was particularly commendable. 

The band also did well to come out when the field was in 
such poor condition. It put on a good showing despite the mud. 

But there is one thing we would like to see the band accom- 
plish here. The band always enters the football field playing 
some march that has no particular interest to the spectators. We 
should like to hear the band march on the field playing a march 
that has almost been forgotten within the last two or three years 
at this college, namely, the "Victory March." We feel that a 
new and suitable arrangement of this school song incorporated 
into the band repertory would be a suitable companion piece to 
the arrangement Mr. Farnham, director of the band, has made 
of the alma mater. 

If you will stop to think a minute, the only songs heard at 
football games have been the Alma Mater and now and then the 
Medley. We believe the Victory March should be re-instituted 
to help along the already revived student spirit at athletic con- 
tests. 



TO TIIE FACULTY 

Within the next month the Collegian hopes to do something 
unique in the annals of collegiate journalism. We've never heard 
of such a thing before, but we believe that it would be very inter- 
esting to students and faculty alike if the Collegian were turned 
over for one edition to the faculty to see what sort of a paper 

Continued on Pagr 5 



FISH STORY 

A* told lo Keinaerd by one who 
wjin there. Onee upon ;• time 
there was a fish. He was a happy- 
go-lucky fellow — always a regular 
sport. Then one clay while he was 
out schooling with a slew of other 
fish, he caught a tuberculosis 
germ in his lung. He couldn't 
very well go out into the fresh air, 
because that would lead to pneu- 
monic tuberculosis. Disastrous. 

Yet he wanted to go to the 
mountains, but how would be get 
there? His vestigial feet were all 
tied up in his bony fins. So he 
couldn't walk up the mountains 
— especially if they were steep 
ones. He might wait for the mon- 
soon rains to flood the mountains, 
but meanw-hile what would that 
t.b. germ be doing? Naturally. 

Maybe he could wait for the 
snow season, hut have you ever 
tried to swim through the snow? 
t'nl de sac there. He might plank 
a fin or two on a snow-drift, but 
he wanted to save it for Lady 
Lillian in the third race. Snow- 
shoes wouldn't help much, either. 

Suicide — that was it. So one 
day in a disheartened mood he 
swallowed a worm — hook, line, 
and sinker. Yes, that was the 
new arrival in the /«» lab. 



TRUE STORY 

Drivel garnered in Smith's Dicken- 
son House: 

"I'm so flat broke that when I hit 
bottom I don't even bounce." 

"I'm so flat broke that when I hit 
bottom I don't even have a check to 
bounce." 



IT'S NOT TO LAlTiH 

"What big feet you have. Look 
at that big toe. Haha." 

"Just because they're a milli- 
meter bigger than yours you don't 
have to laugh. I'm taller than you, 
ain't I?" 

"Yuh." 

"I'm heavier than you, ain't 
I?" 

"Yuh." 

"I'm bigger than you, ain't I?" 

"Yuh." 

"Well, wouldn't I look fine 
running around on your frazzled 
feet?" 



ANOTHER TRUE STORY 

One of the freshman co-eds noted with 
interest the numerous references to the 
Student Sing in the activities programs 
of a couple of iv ■■! I ago. 

She thought that Student Sing must 
be a Chinese scholar. 



JOIN THE ARMY 

A becy of freshmen army men came 
running out of the Drill Hall. 

"Are we cowards?" the head man 
shouted, 

"No!!" thundered the chorus. 

"Are we afriad to fight?" 

"No!!" 

"Are we going to lose the next war?" 

"No!!" 

"Are we going to eat now?" 

"Yes!!!'" 

And they ran pell-mell toward the 
hash house. 

No Nudes is Ciood Nudes 

We like the Stockbridge cross- 
country man who just ran helter- 
skelter past the Collegian office with 
the usual scant attire topped by a 
frosh cap. All for alma malta. 



PRKSIIMKN WARNED 

Continued frcm Page 1 
of Thatcher Hall has also been pro- 
hibited. This fall freshmen have 
been shooting across the road in back 
of the Hall at targets set up in the 
woods. To prevent injury to persons 
using the road, the shooting has been 
stopped. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday, Oct. 22 

7.30 p.m. Band, Mem. Bldg. 
8.00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stockbridge 
Friday, Oct. 23 

Interscholastic Judging Day 
2.30 p.m. Dedeication of the 

Women's Athletic Field 
Women's Advisory Council 
Saturday, Oct. 24 
Football, W.P.I. , here 
Dads' Day 

Interscholastic Judging Day 
Trustee Meeting 
Sunday, Oct. 25 

5.00 p.m. Vespers, Mem. Hall, 
Rev. A. L. Kinsolving, Trinity 
Church, Boston 
Tuesday, Oct. 27 

8.00 p.m. Social Union, German 
Musicians 
Wednesday, Oct. 28 

7.30 p.m. 4-H Club meeting 
Phi Kappa Phi initiation 
Thursday, Oct. 29 

11 a.m. Convocation, J. E. Mer- 
cure of the General Electric 
Co., "Russia Today." 
President's Reception 



Announcements 



Talk on Agriculture 

Brayton Case, an American mission- 
ary to Burma, will present a talk on 
the subject, "Contributions of the 
American Agricultural Colleges to 
Agriculture in Burma", Friday eve- 
ning, October 23, at 7 P.M. in the 
Memorial Building. 

Pre-Med Club 

There will be a meeting of the Pre- 
Med club tonight at 7 P.M. in the 
Auditorium in Fernald Hall. Dr. 
Hough, an outstanding Springfield 
physician, will speak on "Medicine in 
Russia." His talk will be accompanied 
by moving pictures. 




Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN does 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opinion* 
voiced in this column. Communications need 
not be signed, but the identity of tbe writer 
must be known to the editor-in-chief. 



Stockbridge in Scoreless Tie 

The undefeated Stockbridge football 
team kept its record intact Saturday 
in a hard fought game with Vermont 
Academy which resulted in a score- 
less tie. It was played at the Ver- 
mont Academy grounds in a driving 
rain. Stockbridge was ever threaten- 
ing Vermont's goal line but each time 
it was held off by its stubborn rivals. 



Game Tomorrow 

The next game will be played at 
M.S.C. on Friday, October 23, with 
Essex Aggies as opponents. 



Seniors Elect 

At a meeting held during the last 
convocation, the class of '37 elected 
officers for the coming year. The of- 
ficers are: President, Donald Bald- 
win; Vice-President, Donald Mercer; 
Secretary, Frank Wojtklewicz; Treas- 
urer. "Barry" Bush. Gordon Cahill 
and Ralph Sanderson were elected 
members of the Student Council. 



Burnham Recovering 

"Bill" Burnham, president of K.K. 
and member of the football team, is 
well on his way to recovery. He has 
been confined to the infirmary for a 
week with a badly wrenched back. 
Rurnham, whs was injured in foot- 
bai] practice, may be lost to the squad 
for some time. 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Announcement in last week's Col. I 
legian that the Roister Doisters are to 
present The Night of January 10 a> 
their winter production once more 
raises the question of why college 
dramatic societies present the plays 
they do. 

Take the list of plays the Roister I 
Doisters have presented in the last' 
eleven years. She Stoopt to Couqui 
The Devil's Disciple, In the OctagonA 
Captaiyi Applejack, The Youngest,\ 
Twelfth Night, Craig's Wife, Mac- 
hi'th. Dear Brutus, Fannie's First] 
Play, The Americans Come, Outwardl 
Round, The Sivan, Loyalties, Peg 0'\ 
My Heart, As You Like U, There'll 
Altvays Juliet, What Every Woman] 
Knotoe, Death Takes a Holiday, 0n\ 
Corpus Christi Day, Othello, You] 
Never Can Tell, and now The Niglit\ 
of January Hi. 

As far as "classic" plays are con-l 
cerned, the record is admirable. Butl 
when it comes to contemporary plays! 
dealing with modern themes, the rec-l 
ord shows clearly the avoidance of I 
plays which deal realistically with the] 
contemporary American scene. Onel 
out of twenty-three, Craig's Wife,] 
does that. 

For that matter take the list of I 
plays to be presented by the Amherstl 
Masquers this season. Green Grow the] 
Lilacs, "a picturesque story of the old[ 
west"; Candida; Abraham Lincoln, 
"a modern historical masterpiece". 
These certainly do not deal with con- 
temporary America. 

Why do the dramatic societies avoid I 
these plays? Since they assert, in I 
most cases, that they are not out toj 
make money, they cannot be avoiding I 
them in order to attract customers byl 
giving them "entertainment". Conse- 
quently, they must put on plays for| 
their own pleasure. 

This year, however, the Roister I 
Doisters did choose a play which deals 
with the contemporary American 
scene. As for treating it realistically, 
the author of The Night of January] 
10 had no such intention. The play 
was written to entertain only. It is I 
the regular movie "whodunit" thatl 
depends for what success it achieves 
on the theatrical trick of selecting its 
jury from the paying audience I 
There's realism. 

The failure of college dramatic .*o-| 
cieties in general to recognize thel 
growing demand for plays which do I 
deal with contemporary America,! 
plays such as Street Scene which was 
1 rejected by the Roister Doisters last 
j week although it is available and in 
; addition requires only one set, ill 
I causing these groups, as far as the| 
presentation of modern plays is con- 
cerned, to be regarded merely as ama- 
teur stock companies. 

Students, after seeing such movies | 
as Fury and Black Fury, are begin- 
ning to wonder in what direction col- 
lege dramatic societies are going whenl 
they select as semi-annual procltic-| 
tions novelty murder mysteries. 

The answer is, of course, nowhere. I 
They're right where they were ten I 
years ago. 

—The Blowtorchl 



Rushing Season Opens 

The fall rushing season opened this 
week following the smokers held at 
the club house. The smokers were the 
most successful in years and a record 
attendance crammed both houses. 
Some bids are already out and more 
are expected to leave during the 
course of the week. 



STUDENT POLL 

Continued from Page 1 
United States senator is evidence 
either of the popularity of the Repub- 
lican candidate, Henry Cabot Lodge, 
or of | reaction against the present 

governor and president of the hoard 

Of trustees of the College, James 
Michael Curley. 

The poll is both ■ local and an in- 
tercollegiate cooperative project. To* 
r " ■'*)-, the haling mlleer papers 



of all the states, the Collegian is send- 
ing the male results to the I>nil,\ 
Princetonian and coed results to thel 
Vassar Miscellany Neivs to cooperate! 
in a national poll of the opinion of the | 
American campus. The results, col- 
lated and totaled in electoral and pop-l 
ular votes, will be published early i»| 
November. 

Comics 

Students with a sense of humor,] 
could not let the opportunity pass. The J 
anonymous others received 10 voteil 
for governor and 19 for senator. Mail 
Lilly received one vote for presi<lei»l 
and Ed Malkin, one for senator. On* J 
voter thought that Haile Sel 
could continue where he left eft '"I 
Ethiopia and represent Massachu-"'! 
in the United States Senate. Li'' ^1 
Lea truer Al Smith got one stud' ' | 
support him for president. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1936 



YALE TOPPLES STATE B00TERS HERE 



SPORTLITE 



*r*rm* * rw*wr innv * oiitio 



-wv»v.r3 niT» oi)i)ii\i;viw 



(ELEVEN DOWN R. I. 13-8; 



V 



Golle 6iate Di6est 

NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWS IN PICTURE AND PARAGRAPH • 



Opponents Score Twice 
In First Half 

•t a fast Eli outfit 

ed defeat only once 
the Slate hooters 
rday afternoon in a 

.In ii mi Field. Several 

ors Haw the Yale 
lead. 

hich was obviously 

the 88 minutes of 

Kli scoring twice, 

quarter and again in 
lies were made by 
■r of Yale. The Yale 
a fast game with 
Mainstays of the 

■re Orgb, Kosb, and 



Issue 4 




/ - s*- 



I 



ays Start Here 



toning several times 
, (,he Statesmen did 
it drive to net them 
•le. The last period, 
Maroon and White 
y brand of soccer, 
oing the Yale goal 

V State were Capt. 
and Podolak while 
out of his regular 

<ood showing. Goalie 

e made several dim- 
Don Osley, playing 

the Yale defense too 





Yule 


g 


Hall, Ulake 


rf 


Smith 


If 


Wheeler 


rh Da 


».' id son, Keefe 


ch 


Orgh, Resse 


lh 


Raleigh 


ro 


Hills 


n 


Carter 


cf 


Foss, Reese 


li 1 .> . 


ney, Lasselle 


lo 


Pond 



WALKS CLUB 

oks as if the State 
\ movement couldn't 
the public's eye. At 
been exposed to Uu« 
lent seems to have 
the Prince of Wales 
the news last week, 
vain to hear of any 
ough riders. Either 
n't like the publicity 
lger among the fal- 




>K5 TOGETHER 
YEARS • 

ROLD CARLSON 

THE HEAD OF 
140 FROM THE 
ENGINEERING 
£W YORK U. 
5 95, HERS 948/ 



127 

IF THE RICHEST 
COLLEGES IN 
AMERICA HAVE 
A TOTAL EN- 
DOWMENT OE 
•1,270,721,000/ 



\AEN/ 

E yTODEMT IN 
ISA9 HATE 
65 CONTAINING 
H A PAINLEST 
OW CORK CON 
l£ OVIDUCT IN 
/ FORMS N0R- 



W. E. Londergan 

IS 

thampton, Mass. 






\4 
It. 



i K*. .. 







THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. TUUBSUAV. OCTOBER 22. 1D36 



Official newpaper of t he M. rechu.etu State^ojlege. _PubM.hed ererr Thursday by th. tudent^ 



Collegian 



LOUIS A. BREAIILT "37. Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK "37. Associate Editor 

Campu 
PHILIP B. SHIKF37, 1 
RICHARD C. DESMON 
JAMES S. WALDMAN " 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 
MAURICE TONKIN 38 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 
THOMAS J. ENRIGHT ' 




Nomination for official mascot: the 
crimson zebra that chases many a 
student home from Hamp of a Satur- 



CAMPl S CALENDAR 



Thursdny, Oct. 22 

7.30 p.m. Band, Mem. Bldg. 
8.00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stockbridge 
Friday, Oct. 23 

Interscholastic Judging Day 
2.30 p.m. Dedeication of the 

Women's Athletic Field 
Women's Advisory Council 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN doeB 
not neceasarily agree with or oppose opinion* 
voiced in this column. Communications need 
not be signed, but the identity o( the writer 
must be known to the editor-in-chief 



To the Editor of the Colhu'mtr. 



s 



CLIFFORD E. SYMANC 

V 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM 
MITCHE LL F. NEJAMI- 

SUB SCRIP" . 

Make all orders payal 
will please notify the bnsi 
trlbutlons ar« sincerely enc 
asfioe before o'c lock. Mo: 
Entered as second-class ma 
postage provided fo 

Printed by The Klnj 



1036 



Mem 



F^ssocidecl Go 

Distribu 

Golle&iat 



THE POLL 

The Collegia) 
cal poll. We wif 
regard to this pro 
The poll wat 
would have to ta) 
The Collegian die 
lition to Memori 
the regular pollin 
student to expres. 

The results 
feeling in that ei 
no person being t 
been conducted U 
telling just how r. 
The number 
student interest 
voting voluntaril 
pus subject polle 
that the coming 
interest by stude? 
It was also i 
nonsense appeare 
bore evidence of 
ballot have to be 
As to the m 
pected. Student 
is overwhelmingb. 
It should be 
the opinion of 
regime, will neve 
Within a co 
results polled in 
Daily Princetonii 
this "student poll. 

THE VICTOR? 

Last week's 
college spirit as 
yelling to spur t 
who attended th 
was appreciated. 
The cheer It 
handled the chee 
who have made 
on the field wv.s \ 
The hand a> 
such poor condit: 
But there is 
plish here. The 
some march that 
should like to he 
that has almost I 
at this college, i 
new and suitablt 
into the band re; 
the arrangement 
of the alma mate 
If you will * 
football games hi 
Medley. We be) 
to help along th* 
tests. 

TO THE FACT 

Within the I 
unique in the am 
of such a thins b 
esting to student 
over for one edii 





i 



I 'u 




First CCC boys to go to college in Arizona experiment 
^ . 1 Civilian Conservation Corps officials ,n Arizona are now sending their most promising worke 
Trial Se^Tand the university tn a move which, .f successful, may be _ spread totheC^ 
other sutes. S^STwoc selected as the first to go collegiate ,n Anzona, wtth the above group atter 



Tl^^^^^T^^^^^ £* whi le attending college. 



a 




Rollins, Sigma Nu 
Honor Two Greats 



These N«r 
Make N< 



Before ball and receiver meet 



This unusual speed photo of a hackfield player 
ActlOn about to receive a hall from the center shows 
Larry Danhom, senior fullhack for the Fighting Irish of Notre 
Dame, going into action. Al ™ 



Outstanding L. S. V. sophomore 
Tj i Elaine Perm, Kappa Delta at 

llOnOrCQ Louisiana State University, 
has been awarded the Mortar Board medal for 
heing the outstanding co-ed memher of her class. 



FEW people know that Chic Sale's name, strictly! 
speaking, is Charles Partlow Sale. He was born in 

Huron, S. D., 5> years agol 
within sight of one of thcl 
structures he made famoir 
in The Specialist. Letfen 
has it that Chic beom 
"Chic" because he ran 
chicken farm near Madison] 
Wis., between vaudevilf 
engagements. Sale neve 
got beyond the public 
schools in the shadow 
University of Illinois, bu 
the Illinois Sigma Nu 
made him an honour 
member . 





-C- 



Exactly 376.60 acres o] the 9,5 H^zo-acre Wolverine campus 

Lxactly 37 ; ^ ^ ^ <ipprtw ch,ng 10 >^**"**f 

T Ini VPrSltV Of Michigan UnivenMtyof Michigan has ground valued •WJjMJW^ 
LJIllVClJMLy ui itaivm.^ wi r - n ucationa institution controlled by 

S Ann Arbor after the legislature approved the change m 18*7. 



Rex Beach (right) enjoyed Rollins' hazing 

RUPERT HUGHES has become a master o 
monies in radio. Irwin S. Cobb is about 
come one after a taste of starring in motion pi 
but Rex Beach, once an American titan of mass 
telling like Hughes and Cobb, grows old on a 
ranch in Florida. When Rex Beach entered I 
College in 1891, he signed himself Rex Ellin 
Beach. He had no use tor the middle name am< 
tough rabble on the Yukon during the gold rush 
he had left Kent College of Law tn Chicago I 
Beach was a Rollins Kappa Alpha and had • 
some:hing about roughing tt in the Rollins 
football line. 

His first book was Pardncrs in 1905. After 
wrote nothing for publication that wasn't ] 
somewhere. Old timers still believe that Bill I 
and Tom Santschir hero and hadman of silen 
fought the most realistic fight the cameras w 
record when they made the original picture ve 
Rex Beach's Spoilers. Rollins honored A 
Beach with an honorary degree and later w 
presidency of its alumni association. 



CI 

J 
vd 

t\ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 193U 




YALE TOPPLES STATE BOOTERS HERE 2-0 



SPORTLITE 



STATE SPLASH KS 



AMONG OUR OPPONENTS 



ELEVEJTDOWNR. 1.13-8; 

MEET 117 D I KTVT CAT 



Opponents Score Twice 
In First Half 



Pin 



vinir d(ruin 




Follows Father *%£ 

man, son of famed bandmaster Emil 
Coleman, has organized a dance or- 
chestra which plays at many of Buck' 
nell University's leading parties. He 
was a Bucknell senior last year. 



Cp^-j-pU Finding the right way to 
OCdltH Jq wor j c 1S £h e j b f 

these students in the University of 
Iowa time and motion laboratory. 
These students are making motion pic* 
tures of a typical factory operation. 





st a fast Eli outfit 
<>(! defeat only ones 
the State hooters 
arday afternoon in a 
Viumni Field. Several 
uirs .saw the Yale 

lead. 

'hich wan obviously 

(fie 88 in i miles of 

Eli ■coring twice, 

quarter and again in 

Hies were made by 

er of Yale. The Yale 

a fast name with 

Mainstays of the 

ere Orgh, Ko.ss, and 

itening Heveral time.s 
, l,h*' Statesmen did 
nt drive to net tin-in 
de. The last period, 
I Maroon and White 
ly brand of soccer, 
ning the Yale goal 

>r State were Capt. 
and Podolak while 
out of his regular 

good showing. Goalie 

♦.e made several diffi- 
Don Osley, playing 

the Yale defense too 

Yule 

k Hall, Blake 

rf Smith 

If Wheeler 

rh Davidson, Keefe 
ch Orgh, Resse 

Ih Raleigh 

ro Hills 

ri Carter 

cf Fobs, Reese 

li Leaney, Lasselle 
lo Pond 



' WALES CLUE 

•oks as if the State 

1 movement couldn't 

I the pubUe'l eye. At 

been exposed to th- 

nent seems to have 

the Prince of Wales 

the news last week, 

vain to hear of any 

ough riders. Either 

n't like the publicity 

nger among the fa!- 



a une plung€ off center is stopped by nebraska. 

this play is not intended to score. minnesota is 

Booing what every clever tennis star, fencer, or 

baseball pitcher does running plays to get 

their opponents out of position & off timin6 



TWICE AGAIN MINNESOTA THRUSTS AT THE LINE. 

NEBRASKA STOPS THEM DEAD. THEY'RE FIGHTIN6 

WITH EVERY OUNCE OF VIGOR TO PREVENT 

MINNESOTA FROM SCORING 



9 TEAMS OUT OF lO WOULD UNCORK THEIR SCORING PLAYS 
NOW. BUT NEBRASKA EXPECTS THIS. MINNESOTA HAS TO USE 
DECEPTION. FOR THE THIRD TIME THEY CRASH THE UNE. THE 
IS ON THE Ji YARD UNE. MINNESOTA GOES INTO A HUDDLE 




— AND COMES OUT WITH THE SWEET- 
' EST SCORIN6 PLAY I'VE EVER SEEN. LET 

,ME DRAW V0U A COACH'S DIAGRAM 
\ OF IT ON THE TABLECLOTH. . . 




...MINNESOTA IS IN SINGLE WING-BACK FORMATION WITH AN UN- 
BALANCED UNE. THE QUARTER BACK , # 3 BACK, TAKES THE PASS FROM 
CENTERS,® DOES A HALF SPINNER'-. AND TOSSES AN UNDERARM 
LATERAL ~~* TO THE RIGHT HALF-BACK ,*2 BACK®, WHO FEINTS AT 
THE UNE, THEN THROWS A SECOND LATERAL ^ TO THE LEFT HALF- 
BACK, THE TAIL -BACK ® WHO HAS BEEN COMING OVER. THE TAIL - 
BACK PIVOTS QUICKLY AND CUTS OFF TACKLE... FOR A TOUCHDOWN® 




NG TOGETHER 
YEARS • 

ROLD CARLSON 

TH€ HEAD OF 
140 FROM THE 
EMGINEFPING 
cw - YORK U. 
tf 95. HERS 948/ 



MEANTIME EVERY MAN ON THE NEBRASKA TEAM WHO CAN STOP THE 
PLAY IS TAKEN OUT. THANKS TO THE THREE PLAYS JUST PRECEDING, 
THEY ARE OFF-BALANCE AND OUT OF POSITION. THIS MAKES IT 
EASIER -TO STRETCH THEM DOWN FLAT AND OUT OF THE RUNNING. THE 
ACTION PICTURE SHOWS INC PERFECT MINNESOTA BLOCKING- 



("'opyrijrht. !!>&>. It. .1. Reynolds T<>l>acco Company 



127 

)F THE RICHEST 
COLLEGES IN 
AMERICA HAVE 
A TOTAL EN- 
DOWMENT OF 
•1,270.721,000/ 



3WNS UKE 

NO CHILLS 

DOWN MY 

r SO WOFtKED- 
<IG GAME I 
^OY MY 

^R WARDS 



I COVER A GOOD SECTION OF 
THE COUNTRY SEE PRAC- 
TICALLY ALL THE TOP-NOTCH 
ATHLETES — CAMELS ARE THE 
FAVORITE EVERYWHERE 
THEY SET THE 
ALL-TIME HIGH 
FOR MILDNESS 
AND FLAVOR. 
AND CAMELS 
DONT GET ON 
YOUR NERVES 



XI 



tAr 




CAMELS SET YOU RIGHT! 

SMOOTH AWAY THE DAYS UPS AND DOWNS, LET 
DI6ESTI0N GET OFF TO A GOOD START . JUST EN- 
JOY CAMELS AT MEALTIMES AND AFTER. 
SM0KIN6 CAMELS SPEEDS UP THE FLOW OF DI- 
GESTIVE FLUIDS— INCREASES ALKALINITY — 
BRINGS A SENSE OF WELL-BEING — SO 
FOR DIGESTION'S SAKE SMOKE CAMELS. 
CAMELS ARE MADE FROM FINER, MORE 

EXPENSIVE TOBACCOS TURKISH 

AND DOMESTIC— THAN ANY OTHER 
POPULAR BRAND. 

(mm) R.J.REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 
WINSTON-SALEM, NORTH CAROLINA 




V\EN/ 

6 STUDENT IN 
ISA? STATE 
6S CONTAINING 
M A PAINLESS 
OW CORK CON 
IE OVIDUCT IN 
$ FORMS MOft. 



W. E. Londergan 

3S 



thampton, M 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. OCTOBEK 21. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TUL'BSDAY. OCTOBER 22. 1936 



/Bbassacbiise 




Collegian 



Official newtpaper of the Maaaachuwtu State College. PubUihed r r«y Thur sday by the rtudeata. 




Nomination for official mascot: the 
LOUIS A. breahlt '37 Editor-ln-chipf I crimson zebra that chases many a 

FREDERICK LINDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK '37, Associate Editor | student home from Hamp of a Satur- 

Campui 
PHILIP B. SHIFF '37, F. 
RICHARD C. DESMON' 
JAMES S. WALDMAN " 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 
MAURICE TONKIN 38 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 
THOMAS J. ENRIGHT ' 



CAMPUS CALKNDAK 



Thursday, Oct. 22 

7.30 p.m. Band, Mem. Bldg. 
8.00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stock bridge 
Friday, Oct. 23 

Interscholastic Judging Day 
2.30 p.m. Dedeication of the 

Women's Athletic Field 
Women's Advisory Council 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN does 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opinion* 
voiced in this column. Communications need 
not be signed, but the identity of the writer 
must be known to the editor-in-chief. 



To the Editor of the Collegian, 



CLIFFORD E. SYMANC 
V 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM 
MITCHELL F. NEJAME 

SUBSCRIPT 

Make all oiders payat 
will please notify the basir 
trlbuttom ore sincerely enc 
office bef ore o'c loc k. Mo i 

Entered as second-class ma 
postage provided fo. 

Printed by The King 
1936 Mem 

Pbsocided Go 

Distribu 

Golle6iaf< 



THE POLL 

The Collegia} 
cal poll. We wi& 
regard to this pre 
The poll was 
would have to ta) 
The Collegian dk 
lition to Memori 
the regular pollin 
student to expres. 

The results 
feeling in that ef 
no person being h 
been conducted ii 
telling just how r> 

The number 
student interest 
voting voluntaril 
pus subject polle 
that the coming 
interest by studei 

It was also t 
nonsense appeare 
bore evidence of 
ballot have to be 

As to the m 
pected. Student 
is overwhelmingh 

It should be 
the opinion of 
regime, will neve 

Within a co 
results polled in 
Daily Princetonu 
this student poll. 

THE VICTORY 

Last week's 
college spirit as 
yelling to spur 1 
who attended tr 
was appreciated. 

The cheer 1 
handled the chee 
who have made 
on the field was ; 

The band a 
such poor condit. 

But there is 
plish here. The 
some march that 
should like to he 
that has almost I 
at this college, 1 
new and suitablt 
into the band re 
the arrangement 
of the alma mate 

If you will f 
football games h. 
Medley. We be' 
to help along th 
tests. 

TO THE FACI 

Within the . 
unique in the an 
of such a thing b 
esting to student 
over for one cli 




X 



^ 



<■ ' '. 



£ 



. **v 



/£; 



nwj* 



'"''Decisive Battles of tht 
y. r i This intricate and elaborate tern; 

JVLUX2U Tom Loftin Johnson was accepte 
Academy by Gen. John J. Pershing on the i 
graduation from West Point. The artist is ehoi 



J<[ew life for the Trojan warhorse 
y\ 1 Snorting Ambrose Schindler, sopho 

1 O WCmOUSC more sensation in the Southern Cali- 
fornia backfield, is the pride and hope of Trojan followers who 
believe that the old warhorse of U.S.C. needs a shot of football 
adrenalin. Acm« 




,-A 



He vacations at college 
jt- t-\ 1 Judge Michael A. Musmanno 

Keeping rOSteC returned to Harvard for the 
second time since his graduation from college 15 years ago to 
study abnormal psychology and criminology. Said the judge: 
"I could have read all this material in books, but I wanted to 
make sure I was getting the very latest information." 



He's taking motion pictures of vocal chords 

C « A Ul^ But ^y ,c f° rtne ca me ™. not f° r tne doctor. This is a "studio" scene in the I 
Ociy /Vll! versity of Iowa speech pathology laboratory of Dr. Joseph Tiffin, and the sub 
is Bessie Rasmus. Dr. Tiffin's technique has given science its best movies of vocal chords, aided in MM 
cause and cure of stuttering. 



M.iRt-nt.it •■! 




World's smallest radio tube 
qi \\r The shortest wave length ever gen 

OllOrt WcLVe crated can be made with this radio 
tube invented by Chan-Ying Meng, California Institute ot Tech- 
nology leiearch fellow. The tube has a plate the inside diameter 
of which is only one half a millimeter. Wi.k Wnru 



Farthest . . . Youngest . . . Smartest 
Tj 1 Pres. Ralph D. Hetzel of Pennsylvania State College congratulates Kenn- 

irOnOreQ Tsuncxi.1 because he travelled farther than any of his classmates to attend P 
State, is one of .\o youngest freshmen who are 16 or undei, and was one of 47 to earn an exempt 
in English composition. 



YALE TOPPLES STATE B00TERS HERE 2-0 



SPORTLITE 



STATE SPLASHES 



Hardy football fans who braved the 
elements last Saturday to see State 
drag Rhody through the mire for a 
13-8 victory, were rewarded for their 
pains by seeing the first of the inimical 
Rossiter underwater attacks. Rossi- 
ter's beautiful overhand stroke stopped 
the entire Rhode Island line in short 
order. Quel humme! Nice going 
Dave! Captain Rossiter can now take 
his place beside Larry Kelley of Yale 
who has developed into quite a soccer 
player, we hear. . . Ask the Navy. 



Headlines in the News 

Next time Rams intend to bring 
their water-wings to Amherst . . . but 
they still can't pull the wool over our 

I eyes. . . The story in the headlines. . . 
State swims to victory 13-8. . . Massa- 

| chusetts Cod wins by a fin, 13-8. 

The fans were glad to see "Ducky" 
Niden splash his way to the first 
touchdown of the year at Alumni 
Field. Can he carry the mail!!! 



Mudge 

Nominated for the outstanding 
I Rhody back is Mudge who carried 
the pigskin to the State three-yard 
line after running through the defend- 
ing State team. . . This boy was as 
(slippery as the proverbial eel. . . The 
robin-egg blue of the Rhode Island 
I State eleven made a great hit with 
I the co-eds. 

Making their first appearance this 
I season, the band made its usual top- 
notch performance with drum major 
Bozak twirling. . . Orchids to Don 
Weaver for his untiring efforts through- 
lout the game, but in spite of his at- 
tempts the Statesmen found them- 
I selves in hot water throughout most 
lot the second half. 



AMONG OUR OPPONENTS 



Amherst 41, Rochester 6 

Amherst. . . After being held al- 
most to even terms in the first half, 
a superior Sabrina team plunged and 
passed their way to a 41-6 victory 
over a supposedly strong Rochester 
eleven. The Lord Jeffs seemed to 
have developed great scoring power 
since their early season showings 
against Hobart and Harvard. As usu- 
al the Statesmen anticipate a hard 
game against their town rivals. Al 
Snowball, a hard running fullback, 
will offer the Maroon and White seri- 
ous thought. 

Tufts 18, Colby 

Tufts . . . The Jumbos took a weak 
Colby team into camp last Saturday 
afternoon when it won its first game 
in seven starts. The score against 
the Maine team was 18-0. Kieth as 
half back was stellar for the Tufts 
eleven. Halfback Kieth, as usual, 
starred for the Jumbos, aided by 
Spath, Ingraham, Blanchard. Kieth 
brought the ball behind the goal 
twice and passed for the third score. 
R. P. I. 0, Middlebury 13 

Rensselaer. . . After breaking their 
sixteen game losing streak with a win 
over Alfred two weeks ago, the Men 
of Troy, lapsed once more into their 
losing ways by falling 13-0 before 
Middlebury last Saturday. The Ca- 
rawaymen ought to repeat their per- 
formance of last season when they 
encounter the Cherry and White. 
Coast Guard 6, Norwich 6 

Coast Guard . . . The little Army- 
Navy game in which Norwich en- 
countered Coast Guard ended in a 
6-6 deadlock at Norwich. Although 
the Middies did not measure up to 
their performance against Wesleyan 
earlier in the season, the Coast Guard 
game won't be a set up for the Cara- 
waymen. 






[ARRIERS DOWN M.I.T.; 
100TERS B0WT0 WILLIAMS 

MCKARD FINISHES FIRST IN STATE WIN OVER TECHNOLOGY. 
SOCCERMEN PLAY TUFTS NEXT SATURDAY 



For the second consecutive year the 
State cross-country team nosed out 
fhe M. I. T. harriers 26-29. This 
lade the thirteenth straight M. S. C. 
victory on the home course over a 
period of six seasons. 

I'ickard, sophomore star of the 
State squad, took an early lead and 
jield it all the way. Closely followed 
W NeJame of State. Three M. I. T. 
pen, Captain Guerke, Couper and 
pcalingi, tied for third place. In- 
gram and Little shared sixth place 
for the Statesmen. 

In one of the two remaining home 
•Hta of the season, the State harri- 
|r* will meet W. P. I. Saturday after- 
noon. The Techmen have two threats 
Cameron, a freshman, and Patch, 
veteran, who took first and second 
in the W. P. I.-Trinity meet a 
feck ago Saturday. Last year, how- 
'. l'atch followed six Statesmen 
| v, i the finish line in State's 15-49 
fctory. The last Worcester victory 
'er State was in 1933 when, by a 
»e point victory 27-28, they spoiled 
■ undefeated season. 

Summary: — 

Won by Pickard, MSC; NeJame, 
;r - -nd; Cooper, Guerke and Scal- 
[*'. all MIT, tied for 3rd; Ingram 
N Uttle, MSC, tied for 6th; Sabi 
™ Eddy, MIT, tied for 8th; D. Beau- 
font and Reade, MSC, tied for 10th; 
esJardins, MIT, 12th; Wiggin and 
"npson, MSC, tied for 18th; Wagner 
f'Ti 15th. Time— 22 min. 59 sec 






The Massachusetts State varsity soc- 
cer team suffered its first set back of 
the season at Williamstown last Sat- 
urday at the hands of a strong, ag- 
gressive Williams combine to the tune 
of 3-0. A wet field and a slippery 
ball severely handicapped the States- 
men's offensive power, while the 
fighting Sons of Eph took advantage 
of every opportunity and pushed 
across three goals before the final 
whistle blew. 

Scoring by the Ephmen occurred in 
each of the three periods. Sheble, 
Williams right wing, opened the scor- 
ing late in the first period when he 
shot the ball at a difficult angle past 
the arms of goalie Turner. In the 
second period, Close, right halfback, 
captured a free kick in front of the 
State goal, and kicked it through for 
the second counter. The final scor- 
ing was done early in the third peri- 
od when Fowle, speedy right for- 
ward, eluded State's defence, and 
drove home a beautiful shot into the 
far corner nets for the third and 
final goal of the afternoon. 

The Statesmen fought a game but 
losing battle against their Williams 
rivals. Vin Couper, Bob Buzzee, and 
Bud Rodda stood out for the States- 
men, while Davis and Fowle excelled 
for Williams. 

Next Saturday, the soccer team will 
again take to the road when they 
travel to Medford to meet their tra- 
ditional Jumbo rivals. 



ELEVEN DOWN R. I. 13-8; 
MEET W.P.I. NEXT SAT. 



STATE TEAM AHEAD DURING THE ENTIRE CONTEST AS GAMS 

IS PLAYED ON WET FIELD. STRONG WORCESTER 

TECH TEAM HERE NEXT 



Displaying more power to score at 
opportune moments, than their Rhode 
Island State College rivals, the Mass. 
State football team splashed its way 
to a 13 to 8 victory, on Alumni Field, 
last Saturday. The game marked the 
first home appearance of the 1936 
Caraway eleven, and left the specta- 
tors very well satisfied with the grid- 
iron situation at the college. 

The driving rain and mud-soaked 
field contributed to the thrills and 
spills of the contest. There were nu- 
merous fumbles, sloppy tackling, and 
very little opportunity for passing the 
wet ball. But the Maroon and White 
forces were able to muster enough 
power in simple off-tackle thrusts to 
cross the Ram goal line twice during 
the encounter. 

George Niden and Dick Towle car- 
ried the ball over for the two State 
scores. Both touchdowns came in the 
second period, within five minutes of 
each other, the first coming as the re- 
sult of a drive from the fifty yard 
line where Sievers had intercepted a 
Rhody pass. And the second touch- 
down being put across after a sus- 
tained Statesman drive from the 44- 
yd. stripe. 

The Rhode Island scoring came in 
the third and fourth periods. The 
Keaneymen got two points on a safety 
which resulted from a blocked punt of 
Niden's. The final Ram tally took 
place in the fourth quarter. The visi- 
tors, led by Mudge, had been reeling 
off some rather sizeable gains against 
the Statesmen. Mudge suddenly broke 
loose on a play through the line, and 
was away for a sixty yard jaunt to 
the State three yard line, before being 
pulled down by Walt Moseley. On the 
second try, Cupello tallied for the 
Rams. 

Niden was outstanding in the State 
backfield, bearing the brunt of the 
running attack, but being capably as- 
sisted by the excellent play of Brown, 
Towle, and Hauck. In the line, the 
play of Howe, for the short time he 
saw service, was very promising. The 
sophomore end did a good job of 
breaking into the Rhode Island back- 
field and getting the runner. Dave 
Rossiter played his usual steady 
game in the center of the Maroon and 
White forward wall. His accurate 
passes of the slippery ball were help- 
ful in keeping down the number of 
fumbles for the Caraway men. The 
lineup: 



MASS. STATE 
Putnam, Luphum, 
Morey, le 
Fisher, O'Brien 
Zajchowski, It 
Man is. Linden, Ik 
Rossiter, Collins, c 
Bernstein, RobcrK*-, r g 
Gray, Perkins, it 
Moseley, Southwick, How< 
Hauck, Bullock, nl> 
Towle. Cxelusniak, Ihb 
Brown, Kilipkowski, rhb 



R. I. STATE 

Tullmunn, Rinoxki, 

re, Gesick 

Dtpetrillo 

rt, Costelbi 

rg, McCarthy 

c, Robertshaw 

lg. Allen, Christie 

It, Pullano 

. re |e, Diorio 

qb, Wright. Robblee 

rhb, Messina 

Ihb, Albanse 



Niden. StefT, fb fb. Mudge, Elliot, Cupello 

Score, Mass. State 13, Rhode Island 8. 
Touchdown, Niden, Towle, Cuppello. Points by 
goal after touchdown, Fisher (place-kick). 
Safety, M. S. C. (Blocked kick went out of 
end zone). Referee, J. P. Whnlen, Springfield. 
Umpire, E. H. Goodrich. Linesman, II. R. 
Goeway, Pittsfield. Field judge, T. E. Carii- 
gan, Worcester. 



Saturday's lineup: 
State 

Turner g. 

Podolak r.f. 

Conway, l.f. 

Auerbach 

Adams, r.h. 

Kennedy (capt.) 

Couper c.h. 

Buzzee l.h. 

Cain, Kyle r.o. 

Lyman r. i. 

Rodda, c. 

Silverman 

Osley l.i. 

Golub, Johnson l.o. 



Williams 

Johnston 

Davis, Sawyer 

Larkum (capt.) 

Close 

Blake, Fry 

Hadley 

Shelbe, Foley 

Harris, Deyo 

Drake 

Fowle 
Butcher 
Wallace 



Playing their second home game of 
the si'iisim, the Statesmen will engage 
Worcester Polytech next Saturday 
afternoon before a large Dads' Day 
audience. Unlike other years, when 
the Dads' Day game has been con- 
sidered somewhat of a set-up, the 
game on Saturday will find the Ma- 
roon and White facing serious oppo- 
sition. 

Last year, playing the boys from 
the Institute in Worcester, the State 
eleven had little difficulty in downing 
the weak W.P.I, team. The Statesmen 
rolled up an impressive 20-0 win, 
tallying in each of the first three 
periods, while holding the pigskin in 
Worcester territory until late in the 
last quarter. Touchdowns were made 
by Stewart, Lehr and Riel. 

This year's W.P.I, gridiron edition 
is reputed to be one of the strongest 
the Engineers have put out for some 
time. They combined a strong pass- 
ing attack with a driving offense. 
Playing Connecticut State last Satur- 
day, Worcester held the Nutmeggers 
to a 6-6 deadlock until the last five 
minutes of the game. 

The Tech team was reinforced last 
Saturday by the return of Roger 
Grant, a 280-pound guard. However, 
so far this season Forkey, the Worces- 
ter fullback seems to be the mainstay 
of the team. Being keyman for Tech, 
most of their plays are built around 
him, as a result of shot gun passes 
and his long punts. 

The probable Worcester lineup is as 
follows: Johnson re, Lewin rt, Town- 
aley rg, Peters c, Wilson lg, Chandler 
It, Stone le, Germain qb, Gustofson 
rhb, Elliot Ihb, Forkey fb. 



Opponents Score Twice 
In First Half 

Playing against a fast Eli outfit 
which had suffered defeat only ome 
in two years, the State hooters 
bowed, 2-0, yesterday afternoon in a 
game played on Alumni Field. Several 
hundred spectators saw the Yale 
team finish in the lead. 

The game, which was obviously 
Yale throughout the 88 minutes of 
play, found the Kli scoring twice, 
once in the first quarter and again in 
the second. Tallies were made by 
Keaney and Carter of Yale. The Yale 
champs played a fast game with 
plenty of push. Mainstays of the 
team in blue were Orgh, Fobs, and 
Pond. 

Although threatening several times 
during the game, the Statesmen did 
not show sufficient drive to net them 
a win against Yale. The last period, 
however, saw the Maroon and White 
playing a snappy brand of soccer, 
seriously tlireatening the Yale goal 
several times. 

Outstanding for State were Capt. 
Kennedy, Lyons and Podolak while 
Adams, playing out of his regular 
position, made a good showing. Goalie 
Benjamin of State made several diffi- 
cult stops, while Don Osley, playing 
hard ball, found the Yale defense too 
strong. 



M.S.C. 




Yule 


Benjamin 


g 


Hall, Blake 


Podolak 


rf 


Smith 


Adams, Feinberg 


If 


Wheeler 


Kennedy 


rh Davidson, Keefe 


Couper 


ch 


Orgh, Resse 


Buzzee, Adams 


ih 


Raleigh 


Cain 


ro 


Hills 


Lyman 


ri 


Carter 


Rodder 


cf 


Fohs, Reese 


Osley, Silverman 


li 


Leaney, Lasselle 


Golub, Cahil 


lo 


Pond 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Football. M.S.C. vs. W.P.I., 

here, Saturday 
Soccer. M.S.C. vs. Tufts, here 

Saturday 
CroNN-Country. M. S. C. vs. 

W.P.I., here, Saturday 



PRINCE OF WALKS CLUB 

It certainly looks as if the State 
back of the earth movement couldn't 
stand the gaze of the public's eye. At 
any rate, having been exposed to th- 
light, the movement seems to have 
withered. Since the Prince of Wales 
Club broke into the news last week, 
we've waited in vain to hear of any 
tumbles by the rough riders. Either 
the militarists don't like the publicity 
or they're no longer among the fal- 
len heroes. 




After studving together 
fop. six years • 

MR> MRS. HAROLD CARLSON 

GRADUATED AT THE HEAD OF 
THEIR. CLASS OF 140 FROM THE 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
COURSE AT NEW YORK U. 
MS AVERAGE WAS 95, HERS 94 8' 



127 

OF THE RICHEST 
COLLEGES' IM 
AMERICA HAVE 
A TOTAL EN- 
DOWMENT OF 
•1,270,721,000! 



POULTRY POSTMEN/ 

Robert e. Phillips, graduate student in 
poultry husbandry at kansas state 

COLLEGE, MAKES HENS LAY EG6S CONTAINING 
PERSONAL MESSAGES.' THROUGH A PAINLESS 
OPERATION ME INSERTS A H0U.0W CORK CON 
TAINING THE MESSAGE INTO THE OVIDUCT IN 
PLACE OT THE YOLK THE E66 FORMS N0R.- 
• • • MALLY AROUND IT • 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 554 



Northampton, Mass. 



A134VS oamw irnj 






TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1936 



CELEBRATION OF FERNALD 
ANNIVERSARY SUCCESSFUL 



A total of one hundred and fifty 
entomologists and guests participated 
in the celebration last Friday of the 
fiftieth annivarsary of the coming of 
Charles Henry Fernald to Massachu- 
setts State College. Distinguished 
guest of honor for the day was Dr. 
W. E. Britton, state entomologist of 
Connecticut. 

Commemorative exercises began 
immediately after the festive lunch- 
ton which was held in Draper Hall, 
and which was attended by a total of 
eighty-five. Dr. Charles P. Alexander, 
professor of entomology at the college, 
acted as toastmaster for the occasion 
and read a letter from Henry F. Fer- 
nald, former head of the department 
of entomology and only child of 
Charles Henry Fernald. The letter 
concerned the boyhood and early 
training of Charles Fernald. 

Dr. Hugh P. Baker, president of 
the college, spoke of the vast influ- 
ence of Fernald on the science of en- 
tomology not only in the college, but 
in the outside world as well. He 
showed clearly the intense interest of 
Fernald in his work. 

Mr. Albert Burgess of Greenfield, 
who is waging the fight against the 
gypsy moth begun by Fernald, gave 
some of nis recollections of Fernald 
during the period between 1892 and 
1894, and further recollections of the 
eminent entomologist's later life, al- 
most until the timeof his death. Mr. 
Burgess is a former pupil of Dr. Fer- 
nald, and his talk bore personal 
touches which gave an insight into the 
character of the man. 

Dr. E. Porter Felt, another former 
pupil of Dr. Fernald, also spoke. Dr. 
Feltis entomologist for the Bartlett 
Tree Surgery Company of Stamford, 
Connecticut; and, as a member of the 
class of 1891, was the first graduate 
in entomology from the college. For 
more than thirty years he was state 
entomologist for New York. He 
spoke of the influence of Dr. Fernald 
in the development of forest and 
-hade tree entomology for a period of 
over fifty years. 

Dr. W. E. Britton, the guest of 
honor, is state entomologist for Con- 
necticut. The entomologists of the 
state department of entomology in 
Connecticut, under Dr. Britton, held 
their annual meeting here last Friday 
and participated in the commemora- 
tive exercises. Dr. Britton was a 
personal friend of Dr. Fernald, and 
his talk included intimate glimpses 
into the life of the renowned ento- 
mologist. 

The department of entomology at 
M. S. C. was founded in 1886 by Dr. 
Fernald, who established a reputa- 
tion as one of the great pioneer teach- 
ers of entomology in America. He 



1)K SILVA ADVANCED 

Dr. Harry De Silva, formerly of 
the department of psychology at 
Massachusetts State College and 
recently of the research division of 
Harvard University, was yesterday 
appointed to the faculty. 

Dr. De Silva resigned from the 
college last February after his ap- 
pointment as research man at Har- 
vard. His work in automobile re- 
search received wide publication 
and attention while he was at 
M.S.C., and the Rockefeller Foun 
dation at New York granted him a 
special fund to carry on with his 
research. 



Sigma Xi Club 
Seeks Charter 



CLUB NOTES 



SCHAINE SPEAKS 
AT CONVOCATION 



Miss Josephine Schaino, who has 
traveled widely in present day 
Europe, pointed out the close relation- 
ship which exists between, the affairs 
of the rest of the world and those of 
America in her speech at Convocation 
on The Future of the World Commun- 
ity. 

"What happens to one country ef- 
fects all others," said Miss Schaine. 
"Farmers are becoming conscious of 
the fact that their prosperity is de- 
pendent upon international trade and 
conditions." 

The speaker found that the temper 
of Europe last summer was changed 
from what it was in previous years. 
She perceived "Two forces cutting 
across all boundaries; autocracy and 
democracy. Fascists of all countries 
are getting together." 

She also noticed a tendency among 
the stronger nations to force the 
smaller ones to take their places in 
one of these camps. 

The question in the United States, 
asserted Miss Schaine is: "Where aiv 
we going to throw our influence? Are 
we going to throw it with autocracy 
or with freedom" Closely related to 
these questions is the question: "What 
will be our attitude to the attempts 
for world peace?" 

"These problems," concluded the 
speaker, "are not theoretical, but 
must be discussed now in time of 
peace. They are the problems of pub- 
lic opinion." 



An attempt is being made by the 
local Sigma Xi Club to obtain a 
charter from the national organization 
and thereby to establish a chapter of 
Sigma Xi on campus. Representatives 
of the national organization have 
been investigating the status of the 
club, and any resultant action will be 
taken at the meeting of Sigma Xi in 
December. 

Sigma Xi is a society nationally 
organized for the promotion of re- 
search. There are on campus at 
present thirty-three staff members 
who are members of the society, they 
having been elected from other col- 
leges. The Massachusetts State Col- 
lege Sigma Xi Club was formed three 
| years ago. Last year a petition of 115 
pages, containing information about 
the college and its research, was pre- 
| pared by a committee under Dr. W. 
H. Davis, and submitted to the na- 
tional organization as a petition for a 
charter. The petition was given 
favorable consideration, and it was 
voted at the meeting of the Sigma Xi 
society in December, 1935, to appoint 
an official board of visitors to the 
college. The appointee, Professor 
George H. Parker of Harvard, will 
visit the college, and will make a 
report to the society. Any action 
that may be taken will follow the 
report which will be made at the 
meeting of the national organization 
in December of this year. 

If the Sigma Xi Club is awarded 
membership, it will be able to elect 
to it upperclassmen and graduates 
who show aptitude in research. 

The officers of the present Sigma 
Xi Club are: president, Dr. W. H. 
Davis; vice-president, Director Fred 
J. Sievers; secretary, Dr. C. R. 
Fellers. 



OUTING CLUB 

At the first meeting of the Outing 
Club on Tuesday, Oct. 6, Basil Wood, 
librarian at M.S.C., spoke on "hi- 
king." 

A new plan of having small group 
hikes within the club was discussed. 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 

The first of a series of lectures and 
demonstrations sponsored by the 
Chemistry Club was held on Oct. 8 
with Charles Wendell, a graduate of 
M.S.C. in '24, in charge. He gave a 
demonstration in glass-blowing, made 
a condenser, and told about the dif- 
ferent kinds of glass. There were about 
80 people present. 

All Seniors especially and other 
students are invited to attend the 
next meeting when elections of offi- 
cers will be held. 



Christmas Tree to 
Be Planted at Pond 



BACTERIOLOGY CLUB 
PLANS COMPLETED 



Harold L. Frost 'i)5, a member of 
the board of trustees, has offered the 
services of the firm of Frost and Hig- 
gins, tree surgeons, in placing a large 
permanent Christmas tree on the edge 
of the pond. The present tree is dying, 
and will be removed. 

Remove Trees 

With the construction of a road be- 
tween Draper Hall and Goessmann 
Laboratory under the direction of 
Superintendent Armstrong of the 
Grounds Department, the large fir 
tree near the Goessmann Laboratory 
will be removed by Mr. Frost and 
placed at the new site. Several other 
smaller trees will also be removed. 

Under present plans a large maple 
will be planted on either side of the 
entrance of the new road which will 
lead from the recently constructed 
macadam road to the large parking 



inaugurated the fight against the gyp- 
sy moth in 1869 and was known as 
a world authority on several families 
of Microlepidoptera. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 

Electric Wiring Supplies 
Electric Grills, Casseroles 
Electric Coffee Pots 
Electric 1 -Burner Stoves 
Electric Lamps and Bulbs 
Philco and RCA. Radios 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Organization of a projected Bac- 
teriology Club on the campus was 
completed at a meeting held at the 
home of Dr. Bradley of the Bacteri- 
ology Department on October 20. 

Harold Sleeper '37 was chosen 
president; Jameo Dobby '37, vice- 
president; and Alice Bevington '37, 
secretary-treasurer. The program 
for the coming year was discussed in 
detail. 

Following the business meeting, 
Dr. Bradley gave a short talk on the 
American Society of Bacteriologists. 



Musical Record 
Club is Founded 



The music record club, a new or- 
ganization on campus, was started for 
the purpose of creating a lending lib- 
rary for members. It is very similar 
to a club which was started at Ham- 
ilton College and which has been very 
successful. Anyone in the college 
community is eligible. The club was 
formed here by a group of students 
and faculty members who felt a need 
growing for such a music library 
which would be convenient to all 
music students and music lovers. The 
first meeting of the club was held 
Tuesday, September 29 in the Me- 
morial Building. The charter mem- 
bers are Mr. Coding, Mr. Stratton, 
Dr. Fraker, Mr. Wood, J. Paul Wil- 
liams, Stanley Bozek, Alfred Plant- 
ing, and Sandra Gulben. The char- 
ter was drawn up and voted on and 
officers elected with Sandra Gulben as 
president. Other members of the 
club are Mr. Helming, Janet Camp- 
bell, Edith Whitmore, Barbara M. 
Clark, Mr. Ellert, Mr. Alderman, 
Prof. Wahr, and Mr. Fuller. It is 
hoped that all persons interested will 
join the club as it offers an excellent 
cultural background. 

area being built on the north side of 
the campus. 

Scrape Tobacco Field 

Active work on the new parking 
area itself will begin soon with the 
scraping of the one and three-quarter 
acre tobacco field behind Draper Hall. 
The surface will then be hardened, 
and cinders placed over it. 

During the present week the de- 
partment has regraded the newly- 
seeded ground along the new macad- 
am road and paths on the north side 
of the campus to remove footprints 
made by students and tire tracks of 
automobiles. An effort is being made 
to keep students on the walks. 




Matinee 2:30 Evening 6:30 8:30 



Thure., Oct. 22 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Complete line of 

COLLEGE SEAL JEWELRY 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

with your name printed free 

H for 89c 23 for 89c 

59 for 1.30 25 for 1.43 

See our samples ORDER NOW 



Pat O'Brien in 

"CHINA CLIPPER' 

—2nd Big Hit— 

"SPENDTHRIFT" 



with 



Henry Fonda 



Pat Patterson 



Fri.-S.-it., Oct. 23-24 






Bette Davis, Warren Williams in 
"SATAN MET A LADY" 

Chester Morris in 
"COUNTERFEIT" 

Musical Cartoon 



Sun. -Moii. 
FRED ASTAIRE 



•Tuck., Oct. 25-26-27 

GINGER ROGERS 



in 



Wed.-Thurs. 
Oct. 28-29 



"SWING TIME" 

Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy in 
"TO MARRY, WITH LOVE" 



GI^AND€NIC€*/ 
fKTALCANT 

I5< • i Sandwiches Drinks 

Spaghetti 

THE BEST OF EACH 

Dancing Saturday Night 

Orchestra 



HALLOWE'EN 



EVERYTHING FOR THE NIGHT 



Candles 
Aprons 
Masks 
Stickers 



Napkins 
Table Covers 
Nut Cups 
Skeletons 



Costumes 

Lanterns 

Hats 

Noise Makers 



Place Cards 

Tallies 

Table Decorations 

Invitations 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



THE NATIONAL SHOT: REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hifth-chuMed work 

Popular Price* Work Guaranteed 



NEW ARRIVALS 

Worsted tex Suits $37.50 Saxon weave Suits $32.50 

Michael Stern Suits $25 to $35 

Topcoats $19.50 to $32.50 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five years 



College Candy Kitchen 



A NICK TREAT AT THE SARRIS 

this week-end with your friends. lainch or Dinner or refresh mpnts. 

Home Made Pastry. 



INE ARTS SERIES PROGRAM 
TO CONTINUE FOR 20 WEEKS 



THE MASSAC HI SETTS COLLKCilAN, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 33, ISM 



At the first program of the Fine 

-cries, Harold Bauer, distin- 

lighed English pianist, presented a 

i ; tal in the Memorial Building last 

;.,, gday afternoon. This series, an in- 



Professor Waugh 
To Speak On Art 



EDITORIAL 

Continued from Page 2 
they could put out. 

We know that there are several 
faculty members very capable of per- 
forming journalistically. Rather than 
canvass these persons individually, we 
are taking this opportunity of asking 
them to offer their services in putting 
out one number of the paper. The 
faculty will have complete control in 

wrifirnr un n«wc mqlfinir nt-* ♦ H« r». »,»...• 



INTERFRATERNITY EXCHANGE 
SYSTEM TO BEGIN NEXT WEEK 



Intersorority Group 
Elects Kay Wingate 







In order to promote better feeling 
and brotherhood among campus fia- 
ternitv men, the Intcrfraternity Coun- 
cil has announced that an exchange 
system for evening meals will be in- 



ied 

au nit ii from 
ining a dining 
•■r bouse each 
ccording to a 

plan will cost 
pecial meal 

anned, and an 
• acquaint the 
eternity under 

plan will pro 
ling of fran i 
at ions with the 
ejudicc among 

n the campus 

state that tin 

t other colleges 

wful. 

If 28 

i'.V. and Lam 

(change repre- 

Spsilon and Al- 

•pa Sigma and 

Kappa and Al- 
Kappa EpfiiJon 




Wide World 



Another college joins voluntary fingerprinting movement 

AiAir^rrC^ \Aor\ Voluntarily joining a nation-wide movement for ldenti- 
,/i.lvJirig VJ'J.VlcIl fication, practically the entire Pomona College student 
body was fingerprinted during the course of registration for fall classes. Ruth Boi g is 
pictured being fingerprinted by Sgt. George Williams while her classimtes look on. 



ig and passing lity this maty any game interesting 

[*'» f~lr\r» ^*^ ^ n ^ H cnr V Sparks, Right End Perry Schwartz and Halfback 
i. tl ^H-'H George Cornell demonstrate passing and blocking technique for 
'<i fans. They're stellar members of the Golden Hears aggregation. 

IntctiniHinil 



WPA dramatizes plight of depression torn graduates 

a —£ ^q WPA Federal Theatei writers, producers and actors have 

tiSS Ul Zry hm completed .i play which ileal? with the "tragedy ot 

college-trained men .un) women r merging into .i world torn bv depre ss ion t \nJ 
unable to absorb their talents." T lev have named it ( lieu of ".'y. The above photo 
shows "Tippy Sayre" washing the first customer oi his dog laundry, thereby 
proving that I college education helps a voung man get ahead in the world. 

WM i,-,i,t,i rKcjti< PViM 



1C 

nt Ready 

the Carnegie 

■e open for the 

en announced 

tent. Monday 

lection will be 

) four o'clock 

S> 

Carnegie <<,r 
this college a 

honograph, 

library of rec- 

now housed in 
downstairs in 
is equipment 

tdentt the | 
present) played 
trchestraa, At 
stanti are on 
tonography 



75c 



:y 



rait drug 
nediciiMMs, 

tent tb.it 
extended 
n bar. It 
ress upon 
of saving 
»e thrift v 



In 



c. 



T1IE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 12. ItM 



CELEBRATION OF FERNALD 
ANNIVERSARY SUCCESSFUL 



A total of one hundred and fifty 
entomologists and guests participated 
in the celebration last Friday of the 
fiftieth annivarsary of the coming of 
Charles Henry Fernald to Massachu- 
setts State Colh 
guest of honor f 
W. E. Britton, st 
Connecticut. 

Commemorative 
immediately after 
eon which was h 
and which was at* 
eighty-five. Dr. CI 
professor of enton 
acted as toastmas 
and read a letter 
nald, former heat 
of entomology l 
Charles Henry Ft 
concerned the t 
training of Charl 

Dr. Hugh P. J 
the college, spok* 
ence of Fernald o 
tomology not onl> 
in the outside v 
showed clearly th« 
Fernald in his wo 

Mr. Albert Bu) 
who is waging tfc 
gypsy moth begu' 
some of Ris recoi 
during the period 
1894, and further 
eminent entomolo 
most until the tin. 
Burgess is a form 
nald, and his t 
touches which gav 
character of the i 

Dr. E. Porter F 
pupil of Dr. Fern 
Feltis entomologi.- 
Tree Surgery Cor 
Connecticut; and, 
class of 1891, wa 
in entomology fro 
more than thirty 
entomologist for 
spoke of the influ 
in the developni' 
shade tree entomo 
over fifty years. 

Dr. W. E. Br • 
honor, is state en 
necticut. The e* 
state department 
Connecticut, unde 
their annual meet' 
and participated i 
tive exercises. I 
personal friend o 
his talk included 
into the life of t 
mologi.st. 

The departmen 
M. S. C. was foun 
Fernald, who est 
tion as one of the • 
ers of entomology 



DE SILVA ADVANCED 



n*i f> 



Sigma Xi Club 
Seeks Charter 



An attempt is being made by the 
local Sigma Xi Club to obtain a 
charter from the national organization 
and thereby to establish a chapter of 
Sigma Xi on campus. Representatives 
of the national organization have 



CLUB NOTES 



OUTINCi CLUB 

At the first meeting of the Outing 
Club on Tuesday, Oct. 6, Basil Wood, 
librarian at M.S.C., spoke on "hi- 
king." 

A new plan of having small group 
hikes within the club was discussed. 



Musical Record 
Club is Founded 



The music record club, a new or- 
ganization on campus, was started for 
the purpose of creating a lending lib- 
rary for members. It is very similar 
to a club which was started at Ham 
ilton College and which has been very 



KVEKYTHI 



THE MU 

I) 
35 Pleasant i 



THE NATIONAL ! 

3 Main St. 

Try our lti£lt 
Popular Prices 



c 



Camera 
Nappers 



Candid camera shots taken in Uni- 
versity of Michigan classrooms and 
Union Library. 




Co-eds are no exception 



Mathematics vs. Morpheus 



Asleep in the deep . . . subject 





■ 



& 



Rollins' 1 best crewmaster 



/~i - Sally Stearns won 

COXSWailiette berth on the Flori 



a 
Florida 

colleges crew by merit alone, and she piloted her, 
teammates m the first major race won by the 
Rollins tars in three years of competition. 




He's a "practical" profes son 

\\ 7" Tohn R. Murdock. dd 

W inner "the Arizona State Te 
College at Tempe, surprised veto ml 
ticians by defeating 10 other candi lati 
the democratic nomination for Arir.< -n»| 
congressional post. 




The ball will be along in a second 

tt 1 f"\#" William Matt is, who will fill one of the halfback posi 

flC S V-/II tions on the Tulare University team. pauaei , KCOnd 
before starting a long run around the end with the hall that's already 
left the center. h »u m , **»■ 



What's in flue gas? That's if hat they're finding out 
Two chemical engineering students of the Texas Agricultural and Mechanic 
are shown at work testing tlue gas in the boiler room of a large power plant r 
eight-hour test staged by them as a practical educational project. 



Test 



•INE ARTS SERIES PROGRAM 
TO CONTINU E FOR 20 WE EKS 

At the first program of the Fine -^ - ___ t 

tn rrotessor Waugh 

To Speak On Art 



English pianist, presented a 
in the Memorial Building last 
,- afternoon. This series, an in- 



EDITOHIAL 

Continued from Page 2 
they could put out. 

We know that there art- several 
faculty members very capable of per- 
forming journalistically. Rather than 
canvass these persons individually, we 
are taking this opportunity of asking 
them to offer their services in putting 
out one number of the paper. The 
faculty will have complete control in 

writincr nn nourc rrMilfincr im tV»o r*..»w>»* 



INTERFRATERNITY EXCHANGE 
SYSTEM TO BEGIN NEXT WEEK 



Intersorority Group 
Elects Kay Wingate 



'*To Transmit Old^ 
World's Culture" 

Pitt Builds Nationality Rooms 



DEPICT the cultural heritage of those old world cul- 
that form the background of so many of its students 

lies, the University of Pittsburgh is now constructing 
signing a series of "nationality rooms" that will reflect 

st traditions of the ancestral homeland and to preserve 
nsmit, in tangible, symbolic form, an old world's culture, 
II of us as Americans jointly make or remake a culture 
i Jition of our own." 



A 




World's tallest schoolhouse 

On its first floor the 17 na- 
tionality rooms can be found. 



First to complete its room fund 

1 committee for the Chinese room received a 
grant from the Chinese government for its 



V 



'**• 



ft! ft ft'ft 



To finance the Russia.n room . . . 

•• members of the committee staged a benefit 
nncert, dressed in old-world costumes to lend 
icre to the occasion. 




Scottish sponsers . . . 

A bonme lass and laddie doing the 
Highland Fling in the Scottish room. 




Magnet's strength 40,000 times greater than earth's 

1 r\ T — ^ X/T^ir* r\o4- Hayden Jones, research associate of the Uni- 
LL' lOn iViagncL versity of Chicago's Prof. Arthur Compton, 
examines the new magnet that will be used in their laboratory in cosmic ray 
study. In the experiments a "Wilson cloud chamber" will be placed in the field 
of the magnet, and as cosmic rays pass through the moist gas of the chamber 
they will leave a fog trail that will be photographed automatically. 



In older to promote better feeling 

and brotherhood anions campus fra- 
ternity nun, the lnteifiatci ruty Coun- 
cil has announced that an exchange 
svstem for eveninc meals will be in- 



ned 

wo nun from 
dining a dining 
ler boilM each 

iccording to a 
e plan will cost 
\o special meal 
tanned, and an 
acquaint the 
iternity under 

■ plan will pro- 
•ding of 1 1 atei 
rationa with the 
irejudice among 

jn the campus 

•1 state that this 
it other colleges 
wfuL 

er 28 

T.V. and Lam 
txchange repre 
Bpailon and Al- 
ppa Sigma and 
Kappa and Al- 
Kappa Kpsilon 



Acme 



IRWIN L FOSTrR 




Student artists paint song writer's life 

T?<-*o*-£>t- \/F/>rv»/-k*-i^1 ^ e wor 'd s largest collection, outside that 
F OS LCI IViemOriai owned by J. K. Lilly, of Stephen Foster memen- 
tos is owned by the University of Cincinnati and housed in the Foster room 
of the campus library. Students m the school of applied arts recently painted 
murals on the walls of this room, one of which is shown above. 




K 



•*l even a correct way to approach dummies 

lfT\ n\r V^f «-' Lafayette College's head coach, 

■ 11 \\y 1 iSLClICC Ernie Never*, demonstrates the 

to be used in approaching a dummy, with Leo Zochowski 

c willing pupil. 



Pi. 1 litis Int. 




WELL, IF I WANTTED 
THE BEST SMOKE 
POSSIBLE, lb OUST 
LOAD ALL TWREE 
BOWLS WITH 
PRINCE 
ALBERT/ 



RIGHT/ BECAUSE IN 
EVEPV ONE XOU'D 
GET MILDNESS, FOLL 
RICH FLAVOR, AND 
HARSHNESS 
OR 'BITE' 




I BROKE THS PIPE IN ON 
PRINCE ALBERT. THAT 
CRIMP CUT' PA. SAVE IT 
A SWELL CAKE AND 
MAKgSjT SMOKE COOL 
AND 
SWE6T 



MANTV A MANfe HAPPIER 
TODAV BECAUSE ME 
STARTED SMOKING 
PRINCE ALBERT- 

THERE'S NO OTHER 
TOBACCO 

like; 




HERE'S WHY THERE'S NO OTHER TOBACCO UKE PRINCE ALBERT: P.A. IS CHOICE 
MELLOW TOBACCO - "CRIMP CUT* FOR COOLNESS— WITH THE "BITE* REMOVED BY 

SPECIAL PROCESS. ITS THE LARGEST- SELLING TOBACCO 
IN THE WORLD. AND SWELL FOR "MAKIN'S" CIGARETTES.- Tj 



mbW 



KmyntAtm 



SMOKE 20 PIPEFULS OF P. A. AT OUR RISK 



Smoke 20 fraerant pipeful* of Prince Albert If ro* 
e*t, taaboot pipe tobacco >ou e»*r •aaokea 1 . retur* 
mat of the toba c co in it (o u* at any time within a 
wa will la f nnjj full purchase price, plu* poata*e. 



don't find it tk* wallow. 

tha pocket tin with tha 

■ ■nth from tha* onto, anal 






SO 



c o^'' 



Pipeful* of fra- 
grant tobacco in 
■ vary 2 ounce tin 
of Prince Albert 



PrINGEA 



(S.rnerf R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 
Wi**tee»-3alai. North Cerofcne 



LBERT 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



SIC 

•nt Ready 

(i the Carnegie 
Sm open for the 
teen unounced 

in nt. Mond.ty 
•liection will be 
o four o'clock 
/c. 

Carncpic Cor 

this college a 

ihonopraph, as 

library of rec- 

• now housed in 

downstairs in 

'lis equipment 
odenta the besi 
present, played 
orchestras. At 
Ultantl are on 
iionopraph. 



75c 



:y 



r.ile drug 
medicines, 
xtent that 
^ extended 
in bar. It 
jresa upon 

of saving 
be thrifty. 



Inc. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22. 



VXUi 






CELEBRATION OF FERNALD 
ANNIVERSARY SUCCESSFUL 



A total of one hundred and fifty 
entomologists and guests participated 
in the celebration last Friday of the 
fiftieth annivarsary of the coming of 
Charles Henry Fe 
setts State Colli 
guest of honor f 
W. E. Iiritton, st 
Connecticut. 

Commemorative 
immediately afte* 
eon which was h 
and which was at' 
eighty-live. Dr. C' 
professor of enton 
actfd as toastmas 
and read a letter 
nald, former heat 
of entomology * 
Charles Henry F« 
concerned the I 
training of Charl 
Dr. Hugh P. : 
the college, spok. 
ence of Fernald o 
tomology not onl) 
in the outside > 
showed clearly th< 
Fernald in his wo 
Mr. Albert Bu 
who is waging ti 
gypsy moth begu 
some of nis reco 1 
during the period 

1894, and further 
eminent entomolo 
most until the tin 

Burgess is a form 

nald, and his t 

touches which gav 

character of the > 
Dr. E. Porter I 

pupil of Dr. Ferr. 

Feltis entomologi 

Tree Surgery Coi 

Connecticut; and, 

class of 1891, wa 

in entomology fro 

more than thirty 

entomologist for 

spoke of the influ 

in the developm 

shade tree entomo 

over fifty years. 
Dr. W. E. Br 

honor, is state en 

necticut. The e 

state department 

Connecticut, undt 

their annual meet 

and participated 

tive exercises. '. 

personal friend c 

his talk included 

into the life of ( 

mologist. 

The departmen 

M. S. C. was four 

Fernald, who est 

tion as one of the 

ers of entomolog 



HE SILVA ADVANCED 



Sigma Xi Club 
Seeks Charter 



An attempt is being made by the 
local Sigma Xi Club to obtain a 
charter from the national organization 
and thereby to establish a chapter of 
Sigma Xi on campus. Representatives 



*+»*"*« V»o»* 




OUTING CLUB 

At the first meeting of the Outing 
Club on Tuesday, Oct. 6, Basil Wood, 
librarian at M.S.C., spoke on "hi- 
king." 

A new plan of having small group 
hikes within the club was discussed. 



Musical Record 
Club is Founded 



The music record club, a new or- 
ganization on campus, was started for 
the purpose of creating a lending lib 
rary for members. It is very similar 
to a club which was started at Ham 



;lt«n PnlU 



'»»>/! wViinW V»qe huon irc»»«v 



EVERYTHJ 



THE Ml 



35 Pleasant I 



THE NATIONAL 

3 Main St. 

Try our higti 
Popular Price* 



c 





HS. 



*o 



"'•V 

^ 



7> 



She won a popularity election 

i 1 When the Women's Athletic Associa- 

ngleaaer t ion of Occidental College started off 

its new sports year, Barbara Demaree was its official 

song leader. She was elected to the position by popular 

ballot 



<JKJ 



Worm's eye view 
TT j 11 Stellar Stanford University 
ITUQQIC Indians look something like 
this when they huddle during a game to 
plan their next play- -but their faces are 
much dirtier than they are during the 
practice session when this picture was 

taken. Interfuiraul 




Student technicians made this state ship airworthy 
^ i i Students in aviation mechanics at the University of Idaho. Southern Branch, com- 

UverhaUl pletely refurnished this plane for the state's department of aeronautics without aid 
from outside mechanical or technical expert*. Women in dressmaking classes aided them in covering the 
wings and fuselage with fabric. The plane will be used in I statewide survey ot airport and airway con- 
ditions. 




This press printed first newspaper west of Rockies 
a • I Iniveroty of Oregon journalism students assist jourfttlssfln Dean Eric W Allen in print- 

Antique m* ■ nage OH the old ******* hand press, hrst used in iS 4 5 and winch m 19J5 
formed the nucleus <"r th!- present Oregon university press. It ,s as complete M the day it was hrst put into 
operation almost a century ago. 





TURRET TOP, SAFETY GLASS, 
KrVEE-ACTION..THE ALL-AMERICAN COMBINATION' 




T 

M he combination ot features you find on a 
General Motors car is mighty hard to b< at. 
and that traces to the fortunate fact that this 
organization has resources great enough i 
finance the cost of pioneering, and builds sol 
many cars that it can produce new devel >p- 
ments at a real economy. 

General Motors 

A Public- Minded Institution 



CHEVROLET ■ PONTlAC ■ OI.DSMOBII.E WICK I.AMAI.LE 



. 1 ill * 



INE ARTS SERIES PROGRAM 
TO CONTINUE FOR 20 WEEKS 



At the first program of the Fine 
-tries, Harold Bauer, distin- 
i English pianist, presented I 
tal in the Memorial Building last 
lay afternoon. This series, an in- 
■ n introduced this year, will 
te for ID or 20 weeks. 
Although Mr. Bauer's concert was 
jven to a restricted audience, the re* 
pining programs as far as is known 
open unreservedly to the pub- 
t They are to be a combination of 
>.. language and literature talks, the 
fUfdcal afternoons sponsored by I'ro- 
' Hiding, and Professor Waugh's 
•■nodical art exhibits, with a few ad- 
tionftl projects such as the recent 
. The time will be as far as 
ble, Tuesday afternoon at 4:80 
;ind the place upstairs in the 
gmorial Building. Professor Waugh 
ive charge of the next program, 
ctober -7, and will be followed by 
it fessors Goding and Rand, although 
ler is not yet settled. This sc- 
ience will be repeated until the last 
■ogram on March 23. It is under- 

1 that while these plans are large- 

t( > tative and subject to change or 
, a real effort will be made to 
lid to them. 
Initiated by Professor Goding 

The project of the Fine Arts Series 

a response to the growing interest 

i this campus in artistic matters. In 

e words of Professor Waugh it is 

tended to let the student body know 

at something worthwhile is going 

. Heretofore such efforts have been 

attired. About six years ago Pro- 

Mdr Goding initiated a series of 

inter concerts; approximately ten 

odents would gather to hear and 

KOS8 a musical program. Last year 

e audience had increased to an av- 

gge of thirty, and on special occas- 

01 rose as high as fifty. Similarly 

ndance at the talks given by 

e Language and Literature Depart- 

iiit has grown rapidly in the last 

•irs. 

year a Fine Arts Council was 
pointed by President Baker, con- 
ning of Frank A. Waugh, as chair- 
ftft; Frank Prentice Rand, Miss 
Skinner, Basil B. Wood, Orton 
Clark, Stowell C. Goding, and 
Srold W. Cary. In the spring semes- 
r l highly successful Midsummer 
ight'e Fantasy was presented, the 
mbined work of all fine arts depart- 
sntfi. This year it has been decided 
>■ the integration more com- 



MKET AT 



BARSELOniS CAfE 



Professor Waugh 
To Speak On Art 

The second number in the Fine Arts 
Series will lie offered on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 27 at 4:80 P.M. In the Lounge 
of the Memorial Building Professor 
Waugh will talk on aspects of the 
etchings and other prints which are 
being exhibited this week and next in 
that room. This collection has been 
obtained from the American Asso- 
ciated Artists. 



EXHIBITION OF 
PICTURES BY 
CAMERA CLUB 



I'.ALLANTINE'S ALK 



HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 



Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



Including many novel and highly 
distinctive photographs, a one man 
show by Dr. Paul E. Truesdell of 
Montclair, New York, composes the 
present exhibit of the Amherst Cam- 
era Club in Goodell Library. 

Strong In Portraits 

The collection is especially strong 
in portraits. One such holds feature 
position, Harmonica Bitten, a pene- 
trating character study of a negro 
youth, completely absorbed in the tune 
he is playing. There is a charming 
child portrait, Curly Top, and two 
lovely pictures taken full face, both 
called Doris. 

A striking feature of the exhibit 
is a group of photographs which are 
unusual because of their treatment of 
commonplace subjects. The camera 
records a hidden beauty of design in a 
crystal Sugar Bowl and the Shadow* 
of a glass goblet. Spilled Pills and a 
pair of dice are seen as something 
rich and strange. The photographer 
has another trick of taking his pic- 
ture from an unexpected angle, and 
we have in Jackknift a worm's eye 
view of a figure executing a familiar 
dive. 

Humor 

A touch of humor is found in Man- 
(h/'s Conscience and What Is It. 
Electric Welding depicts well dazzling 
glare and fantastic shadows. Disastt t 
shows a great ship crashing on the 
rocks. 

The collection is perhaps weakest in 
its landscapes, none of which are very 
impressive. In this category home 
Pine and hate Shadows stand out, al- 
though both are rather conventional. 
Still life, usually represented by a 
few prints, is entirely lacking in this 
exhibit. 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 
By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



SheafTor, Parker and Waterman FOUNTAIN PENS 
Die Stamped Stationery Daily and Sunday Papers Delivered 



A.J. Hastings 



stationer" 4 17 So. Pleasant St. 



M.S.C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DATE IH> IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town, 
k called for and delivered Telephone 828 



KIMTOHIAI 

Continued from Page 2 
they could put out. 

We know that there are several 
faculty members very capable of per- 
forming journalistically. Hather than 
canvass these persons individually, we 
are taking this opportunity of asking 
them to offer their services in putting 
out one number of the paper. The 
faculty will have complete control in 
writing up news, making up the paper 
and in conducting the editorial board 
meeting. We do not believe they will 
need any aid from the regular board. 

We shall be very disappointed if 
President Baker does not offer to 
write the editorial, if Professor Waugh 
and Dean Lanphear do not want to 
take care of the mechanics of the 
paper and if any other competent 
faculty member does not wish to take 
a little journalistic recreation. Inci- 
dentally, we already have the column- 
ist signed up. 




Sigma Beta Chi 

Sigma Beta Chi announces a new 
pledge, Elaine Milkey '38. 

Harriet Jackson '35 was married 
on October 10 to Alan Bobbins. 

A Tea was held at the Abbey on 
Wednesday, October 21. It was the 
first of the series sponsored by the 
W.S.G.A. The tea was in the charge 
of Kay Birnie. 

The seniors have plans underway 
for a Hallowe'en Party to be given for 
the sorority on October 30, Hallo- 
we'en eve. 
Lambda Delta Mu 

Bettina Hall '39, is directing the 
sorority's presentation for the dedica- 
tion exercises of the new athletic 
field. 

The arrangements for a tea to be 
held in the Abbey center on October 
28 are under way with Ruth E. 
Wood '38 as chairman. 

Ruth Lindquist '35, visited at the 
sorority house for a few days during 
the past week. 
Phi Zeta 

A tea was given to Mrs. Henshel, 
housemother, on Sunday. The facul- 
ty and advisers of the sorority also 
attended. 
Alpha Lambda Mu 

A luncheon will be served for the 
Dads on Saturday afternoon. 



BOOK ENDS 



STATE COLLEGE 



AND NUART BRONZE 



1.25 i».iii 



Itliss Cutler' $ Gift Shop 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 




Ma—.. State 
students are 
invited to our 
store for the 

latest in 

riding togs 

and 

sportvear. 



We stock breeches, riding hoots. 

Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



INTERFRATERNITY EXCHANGE 
SYSTEM TO BEGIN NEXT WEEK 



Intersorority Group 
Elects Kay Wingate 



A very short meeting of the Inter- 
sorority Council was held Thursday 
afternoon, October 15. Kay Wingate 
was elected head usher for the com- 
ing year. The regular meetings of the 
council will be held on the first Wed- 
nesday of every month, at 4:30 in the 
afternoon. The council is, at present, 
working on the new system of plaques 

which will be awarded for competition 
in academies and scholastics to that 
sorority with the highest number of 
points. 



Fred Watson '40 Is 
Elected President 



Fred Watson was elected to the 
presidency of the Freshman class in 
their election held last Thursday at 
convocation. Marjorie Smith, vice- 
president; Virginia Gale, secretary; 
Robert Jones, treasurer; Lawrence 
Reagan, class captain; and Alan 
Smith, sergeant-at-arms complete the 
list of officers for the year. 

Fred Watson and Larry Reagan 
graduated from Jamaica Plains High 
School, Marjorie Smith from Spring- 
field High, Virginia Gale from Mar- 
blehead High, Alan Smith from New- 
ton High, and Rob Jones from Wor- 
cester Classical. 



Amherst Football Tickets 

Those desiring good reserved seats 
for the Amherst game should make 
their reservations at the Physical Ed- 
ucation Office as soon as possible. 

All requests for tickets must be ac- 
companied by cash, check, or money 
order for the full amount. Reserved 
seat tickets are $2.20 each. 

Student activity tickets may be ex- 
changed for reserved seats on the pay- 
ment of $1.20 each. All additional 
tickets are $2.20 each. These tickets 
are now available and no exchanges 
will be made after Thursday, Octo- 
ber 2!). 

Student activity tickets are good 
for admission to the Massachusetts 
•State cheering section. 



In order to promote better feeling 
and brotherhood among campus fra- 
ternity men, the Intel fraternity Coun- 
cil has announced that an exchange 
system for evening meals will be in- 
stituted. 

Plan Outlined 

Under this plan two men from 
each fraternity maintaining a dining 
hall will go to another house each 
Wednesday evening according to a 

definite schedule. The plan will cost 

nothing in operation. No special meal 
or entertainment is planned, and an 
effort will be made to acquaint the 
visitors with the fraternity under 
normal conditions. 

It is hoped that the plan will pro- 
mote better understanding of frater- 
nity problems and operations with the 
end that politics and prejudice among 
fraternity members on the campus 
will decrease. 

Sponsors of the plan state that this 
system has been used at other colleges 
and found to be successful. 
Starts October 28 

On October 28, Q.T.V. and Lam- 
bda Chi Alpha will exchange repre- 
sentatives, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Al- 
pha Gamma Rho, Kappa Sigma and 
Theta Chi, Phi Sigma Kappa and Al- 
pha Sigma Phi, and Kappa Epsilon 
and Q.T.V. 



Carnegie Music 

Equipment Ready 

Hours during which the Carnegie 
music equipment will be open for the 
use of visitors have been announced 
by the Music Department. Monday 
through Friday the collection will be 
available from two to four o'clock 
and Sunday two to five. 

Two years ago the Carnegie Cor- 
poration presented to this college a 
valuable Capeheart phonograph, as 
well as an extensive library of rec- 
ords. The collection is now housed in 
the Carnegie Room, downstairs in 
Goodell Library. This equipment 
makes available for students the bc.-t 
music of the past and present, played 
by the world's great orchestras. At 
the times stated, assistants are on 
hand to operate the phonograph. 



BYGEONIC DRY 

Men's Suits 75c 



CLEANING 

Plain Dresses 



75c 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

TIIK CUT BATE STORK 

The Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. is the only cut rate drug 
store in town. We cut prices on all patent medicines, 
drugs, cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco, to the extent that 
we challenge comparison. Our cut rate policy is extended 
also on our modern and up-to-date soda fountain bar. It 
is our privilege to call to your attention and impress upon 
you the word CUT RATE. It is a symbol of saving 
money in your own pocket book. It's wise to be thrifty. 



Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. 

TIIK (IT BATE STORK 



EDO IK M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



H 



THE MASSACIIl SKTTS COLLBOUN, THURSDAY, OCTOBKK '22. 1»»B 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



II ICKB Y-FREEM AN CLOTHES 

Our Fall line of Hickey-Freeman clothes is highly indi- 
vidualized in Fashion, Fabric and finish. . . The values 
exceptional ! . . . The prices moderate. 



Kirtley Mathers 

Vesper Speaker 

In his sermon, "The Impact of Mod- 
ern Science on Religion," which he 
delivered at the Vespers Service on 
Sunday, October 18, Professor Kirtley 
F. Mathers of Harvard University 
showed how modern science and reli- 
gion were working hand in hand. 

"In religion," stated Professor 
Mather, "the scientific method is be- 
ginning to have its place." Thus in- 
stead of appealing to authority, "In 
religion arguments are settled by ap- 
pealing to the experiences of the in- 
dividual." 

"Science," continued the speaker, 
"is in the service of religion." He 
enumerated the ways by which sci- 
ence has helped religion as follows: 
cure the sick; help the poor; better 
the environment. 

Professor Mathers pointed out that 
the scientist is blind to the conse- 
quences of his discoveries. As a result 
"Religion must select the goals toward 
which the scientific spirit must pro- 
ceed." 

Science tries to relate changes in 
substances to time and space; how- 
ever, he asserted science finds certain 
things which can not be related to 
time and space such as: love, beauty 



WOMEN'S FIELD 

Continued from Page 1 

be used are to be given by individual 

students and selected groups. 

Country and Morris dances by 
members of the classes of 1939 and 
1940 will complete the program. 

Program 

The detailed program follows: 

Ded icatory Exercises 

Introductions Professor Adeline S. Hicks 

Address of Welcome President Baker 

Presentation of Field Mr. Paul Williams 

Acceptance of Field Mrs. Lottie A. Leach 
Uses of the Field Dr. Dorothy S. Ainsworth 

Pageant 

Reception and Roll Call Committee W.S.C.A. 



MOUNTAIN DAY 

Continued from Page 1 
transportation after the noisy an- 
nouncement by the old library bell. 
Trucks, buses, and other vehicles of 
various and sundry makes and con- 
dition were the means of approaching 
the mountain. 

After the serenade home was the 
immediate objective of every person 
still able to travel and thus another 
Mountain Day to end Mountain 
Davs was concluded. 



Uncle Sam's Project 
Symbolic Seasons 

Winter 

Spring 

Summer 

Autumn 
The Laborers 
Dance of the Weeds 
The Machine Dance 
Dance of Destruction 
Interferences 

Sports Review 

Badminton. Baseball. 

Hoop, Tennis. Archery, Hockey, Volley Ball. 

Country Dances Class of 1940 

Morris and Country Dances Class of 1939 

Student Committees: 

W.S.G.A.. Ruth Todt: W.A.A.. Phyllis Glea- 
son : Alpha Lambda Mu, Edith Whitmore ; 
Lambda Delta Mu. Dorothy Donnelly ; Sin- 
ma Beta Chi. Lucille Monroe ; Sigma Iota, 
Beatrice Waxier. 



Charlotte Cox 

Jessis Kinsman 

Irma Malm 

Rosamond M. Burke 

Alma R. Boyden 

Alpha Lambda Mu 

Lambda Delta Mu 

Sigma Beta Chi 

Sandra Gulnen 

Phi Zeta 

Ethel W. Blatchford 
Basketball. Soccer. 



i — ~" ' 

and mercy. "Awareness of non-ma- 
terial qualities is becoming greater in 



terial qualities is 
life 



IIORT. SHOW 

Continued from Page 1 

More Student Exhibits 

As in the past, the Holyoke and 
Northampton Florist Club will exhibit 
as well as the South Amherst Fruit 
Growers Assn. Since this year's 
plans will allow for a larger amount 
of exhibition space, than in the past, 
more student exhibits are expected. 

The student committee is headed 
by Walter J. Hodder '37, and consists 

of: 

John A. Tuttle '37, Olericulture; 
Norman W. Butterfield '37, Floricul- 
ture; Lee Rice, Jr. '37, Pomology; 
Robert Thorndike '37, Landscape 
Architecture; Ralph Gates '37, Store; 
Philip Lyton '37, Publicity; and Wal- 
ter Simonsen, Horticultural Manufac- 
tures. 



•38 



Paylor 

Griggs 



Anderson 



DAD'S DAY 

Continued from Page 1 
ternity will render two selections, and 
will be limited to sixteen men. Win- 
ners in the sing will receive credit 
toward the interfraternity competi- 
tion. 

The program for the interfraternity sing, 
arranged by the Council, is as follows: 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Summer Evening 
Dear Old Massachusetts 

Led by Benard Cohen 

Q.T.V. 

Undecided 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Evening Hymn 
Phi Sigma Kappa Sweetheart 

Rorick arranged by Stratton 
Led by Gordon Najar '38 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

The Voice in the Old Village Choir Kahn 
Can't yo' Heah Me Callin' Caroline Roma 
Led by D. Tucker '37 
Theta Chi 

Without a Song 

March of the Musketeers 

Led by F. M. Lyon '37 
Alpha Sigma Phi 

Lord Jeffrey Amherst 
Now The Day Is Over 

Led by Russell Smith "37 
Kappa Sigma 
Sylvia 
The Shadow March 

Led by N. Grant '37 
Alpha Gamma Rho 

The Minstrel Boy M 001 " 1 ! 

The Volga Boatman Traditional 

Led by Murray George '37 
Kappa Epsilon 
Empty Saddles 
Keep the Home-Fires Burning 

Led by George Milne '37 
Phi Lambda Tau 
Funicula, Funicula 
Go Down Moses 

Led by Irving Binder 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Not entering 
Judges: 

Dr. Charles E. Froker 
Prof. Stowell C. Coding 
Mr. Vernon P. Helming 



Youmans 
Friml 



Hamilton 
Barney 



Speaks 
Protheroe 



Hill 
Ford 



Denza 
Traditional 
38 



...that's the 

whaleman's signal 
for a a 



smoke 




HAROLD BAIER, PIANIST 

REVEALED AS MISICI.V> 

Continued from Page 1 

man in musical rhythm," he con. 

tinued. 

Interesting Personality 
In Mr. Bauer's estimation, thj 
artist is nothing but the purveyor 03 
the thought or picture or mood to tl 
listening audience; the actual musi 
is the thing. 

A study of the great musician's per] 
sonality reveals a great personal charn 
and knowledge and curiosity. Hii 
sense of humor was very pronounce 
and revealed itself constantly. Hii 
so-called "lack of showmanship" J 
actually a result of his modesty anc 
great love of music. 

Mr. Bauer does not play for ap 
plause but for love of music itself 
He plays the way music is suppos 
to be played — sheer beauty withou 
the usual fanfare which artists lend to 
their programs. 

Harold Bauer is well-known as th* 
founder of the Beethoven Society 
New York and has been honored wit] 
a membership in the Legion d' Honneur 
the greatest award given by the 
government of France, for his wori 
as a musician. His genuine love for 
music and his great knowledge 
universal matters make him an out| 
standing personality, and the studen 
body has been honored by his presenc 
at Massachusetts State College. 



And on land and sea, 
from coast to coast . . . with 
millions of smokers, men 
and women . . . when they 
take time out to enjoy a 
cigarette it's 

"Smoke -O . . . 
pass the Chesterfields" 
Chesterfields are milder . . . 
and what's more they've 
got a hearty good taste that 
leaves a man satisfied. 



CURRENT 
EVENT 

Amherst 

M. M» S« Ca 




Lih . 

OCI 2 ) I 
Massachi 
State Collect* 



dtoflrpn 



OUTSTANDING 

KVENT 

UhiIm* Dny 

Itoonl 



vol. xlvh 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTORER 29, 1936 



No. 6 



Over 600 Present On 
Dads' Day; New High 



Nogelo '37 Places First In 
Horse Show; Theta Chi 
Winner of Interfraternity 
Sing In Evening 

A record crowd of over 600 dads 
| registered at Memorial Hall for the 
tenth annual Dads' Day, held last Sat- 
urday. 

The program, arranged and super- 
vised by the committee under Leroy 
Clark '37, included many and varied 
events designed to entertain a large 
and varied audience. Registration of 
the dads took place from 9 o'clock until 
2 o'clock. The Horse Show was staged 
at 10 o'clock, and was followed by a 
reception given by the faculty in Me- 
morial Hall. 

In the afternoon the dads watched 
[State bow to W. P. I. in football, but 
triumph in cross-country. In the even- 
ing the combined fraternities and sor- 
rities entertained with the interfra- 
[ternity sign and skits. 

Horse Show Winners 
The Horse Show was divided into 
wo parts. A mounted exhibition drill | 
y the senior cadets comprised the first 
alf, and a competition in jumping 
ade up the second half. Winners 
.vere : first place, Anthony Nogelo '37 ; 
second place, John Landers, '37; third 
lace, Leroy Clark, '37; fourth place, 
Kenwood Ross, '37. Elinor Stone '37, | 
resented the ribbons. Major Connors j 
as the judge. 

Theta Chi Wins 

The day's festivities were brought 
:o a conclusion with the interfrater- 
ity sing in the evening. Theta Chi 
ed by Frank Lyon, was adjudged win- 
ler of the competition. Second place 
fas awarded to Phi Lambda Tau, led 
y Irving Binder; third place to Phi 
igma Kappa, led by Gordon Najor 
ourth place to Lambda Chi Alpha, di- 
rected by Donald Tucker. 



•0LITICAL DEBATE 
BY DEBATING TEAM 



ALUMNI RADIO 
PROGRAM ON 
NOVEMBER 5 

College to Broadcast to 
Alumni from Springfield 

Described as "the biggest and best 
alumni reunion ever held for Massa- 
chusetts State College graduates," a 
half-hour radio program, to be broad- 
cast Thursday evening, November 5, 
at eight o'clock, over the Westing- 
house stations WBZ and WBZA and 
the short wave station W1XK, will 
carry to Alumni all over the world a 
musical and spoken description of stu- 
dent life on the M.S.C. campus. 
Originates in Springfield 

Over two hundred Alumni, Alum- 
nae, wives, husbands and friends will 
be present in the main ballroom of the 
Hotel Kimball in Springfield where the 
program is to originate. 

Mr. Hawley, '18, and Mr. Francis 
Pray, '31, have arranged the program. 
Mr. E. J. Rowell, '24, who is president 
of the Boston Alumni Club, will act 
as master of ceremonies. The college 
band and the combined musical clubs 
will provide the music. 

Taber, Baker to Speak 

Ralph Taber '16, president of the 
Associate Alumni will send greetings 
to Alumni all over the world. Presi- 
dent Hugh P. Baker will speak con- 
cerning the progress the college has 
made and the services it has rendered. 
Francis C. Pray has written a sketch 
which will be of interest to all gradu- 
ates. Characters in the sketch have 
been cast by Professor Frank Prentice 
Rand from members of the Roister 
Doisters, the college dramatic society. 
And to conclude the program the full 
college band will play the Alma Mater, 
"Sons of Old Massachusetts." 



MADE HEADS OF 
UPPER CLASSES 




For the benefit of those interested 
the present political campaign, a 
lehate on the coming presidential elec- 
tion will be presented by the debating 
lluh in the Memorial Building at 8 
I'clock next Sunday night, November 

Both sides will be represented by 
irpe men, who will speak for ten 
linutes each, with no rebuttal. The 
Ippublican team, which will be taken 
I* affirmative includes, in the order 

Continued on Page 5 



Goldberg to Speak 
On Honor System 

Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg of the 
paitment of Laguages and Litera-> 
re of Massachusetts State College 
peak before the student body of 
ollege at the regular convoca- 
noxt Thursday morning. His. 
t will be "The Honor System." 
the basis that the goal of edu- 
tiori is character, the college in- 
ffuratod the system many years ago 
! nducting examinations. It is 
»f the agencies at the college that 
ting the moral and ethical code 
students. 



Trustees Attend 
W.A.A. Dedication 



No action was taken by the Board 
of Trustees during their visit to the 
college last weekend. The six mem- 
bers present met informally, attended 
the dedication, and football game, 
and visited Mt. Toby. 



DAVID L. ROSSITER '37 

ROSSITER HEADS 
SENIOR CLASS IN 

RECENTVELECTION 

Dave Rossiter and Herbert Brown 
have been elected presidents of the 
senior and junior classes respectively. 
As the results of the elections last 
Thursday were announced, new of- 
ficers were in office in both classes. 

In the senior class, Helen Down- 
ing, vice-president; Carl Swanson, 
treasurer; Elinor Stone, secretary; 
Robert Holdsworth, class captain; and 
Al Bruno, sergeant at arms, were 
elected to fill the remaining offices. 

The juniors elected Ruth Wood, 
vice-president; Fred Sievers, treas- 
urer; Jesse Kinsman, secretary; 
Dave Mildram, class captain; and 
Fred Riel, sergent at arms. 

Dave Rossiter, besides heading the 
senior class is captain of the football 
team on which he has been a main- 
stay since his sophomore year. He is 
also president of Adelphia and a mem- 
ber of the Senate. In his sophomore 
year he was president of the Maroon 
Key and made his entry to the hockey 
and football teams. Dave his been 
chairman of many of the most suc- 
cessful dance committees and is at 
present on the informal committee. 

For the second time, Herbert 
Brown is president of his class. In 
his sophomore year he was president 

Continued on Page 6 



Amherst Weekend to 
Close Social Season 




HERBERT E. BROWN '38 

COMMITTEES FOR 
WINTER CARNIVAL 
ANNOUNCE PLANS 



Plans for the second annual Winter 
Carnival to be held at Massachusetts 
State College this coming winter have 
been announced by Phil Layton '37, 
general chairman of the committee. 
February 11-14 

The carnival will take place on Feb- 
ruary 11, 12, 13, and 14, and will con- 
sist of a Snow Pageant at which a 
Snow Queen will be crowned as Queen 
of the Carnival, sleigh rides, basket- 
ball game, hockey games, and other 
forms of general winter sports. 

The head committee is comprised of 
Phil Layton '37, chairman; Crawford 
Adams '38, vice-chairman; Jessie 
Kinsman '38, secretary; and Mitchell 
Jackson '.38, treasurer. 

Other Committees 

Four main committees have been ap- 
pointed and consist of a general com- 
mittee, winter sports committee, social 
committee, and publicity committee. 
The general committee is headed by 
Eleanor Stone '37, and includes sub- 
committee chairmen Norman Butter- 
field '37, Charles Eshbach '37, Walter 
Guralnick '37, and Walter Seelig '37. 

The winter sports committee is 
headed by Sydney Kaufman, member 
of the Division of Physical Education, 

Continued on Page 6 



Unidentified Man Reveals Art Of Distinguishing 

Between Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors 



i 



o 



Ed. Note — Books have been written 
on how to tell your friends from, the 
apes. Why not a little item on how to 
tell college students from the apes, or 
even seniors from freshmen? In the 
folloiving article, vrritten especially 
for the Collegian, an unidentified 
man tells of hus experiences in this 
nncongested field of endeavor. 

Did you know that a fellow student, 
whether you have ever seen him be- 
fore or n«t, is the easiest person in 
the world to recognize? (The person 
who mouthed that crack about hay- 
seed in the hair will be taken aside 
and shot. Now, to go on.) There is 
an indefinable something about college 



students that forms a common bond. 
I Call that something an air of assur- 
ance, of cynicism, of self-possession ; 
; call it what you will. But the fact 
, remains that freshmen don't have it, 
] seniors do. Just try to distinguish be- 
i tween visitors and students sometime 
— simplest thing in the world. 

Class of 1940 

But not only is it possible to notice 
I a difference between students and out- 
j siders, but also differences between the 
various classes are easily recognizable. 
(The person who just mumbled that 
freshmen wear hats will be taken out 
and severely chastised. Outside of the 
fact that freshmen are in a be- 



wildered, dazed, and somewhat awed 
state of mind, and that they obvious- 
ly try to appear in the know, we will 
disregard the class of '40. 

Class of 1939 

Take '39-ers. They left college last 
June fairly respectable people, and 
came back with waffles or whippets or 
whatever the darned things are called. 
But that isn't the worst. They came 
back owning the college. (Oh, yes, you 
did. We were sophomores ourselves 
once and know all the tricks.) They 
walk about campus with a strange 
overbearing manner, somewhat, we 
imagine, as the old feudal lords might 

Continued on Page 6 



Athletic Contests, Tea 
Dance, and Fraternity 
House Parties feature 
Gala Weekend 



What promises to be the most suc- 
cessful Amherst week-end of recent 
years will get under way tomorrow 
night with the Adelphia bonfire and 
rally. The outstanding event of the 
fall season, Amherst week-end this 
year will feature three major sport 
contests, the fraternity house dances, 
a tea dance, and various sorority 
parties. 

Opening with the soccer game with 
Amherst Friday afternoon, the pro- 
gram will continue Friday evening 
with a hallowe'en party at Sigma Be- 
ta Chi, and the monster rally spon- 
ored by Adelphia. 

Climax Saturday 

Saturday's events will feature the 
annual football classic with Amherst, 
a cross-country meet, a tea dance in 
the Drill Hall, climaxed by the frat- 
ernity house dances and round robin 
in the evening. Alpha Lambda Mu 
will conclude the week-end with a 
Hallowe'en Party Sunday evening. 
Complete Plans 

Plans for fraternity house parties, 
announced this week, are as follows: 

Alpha Gamma Rho: Hy Hubbard 
and his band of Westfield. Informal. 
Chaperones, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Da- 
vis and friends. 

Alpha Epsilon Pi: The Bay Staters 
of Springfield. Informal. Decora- 
tions in Hallowe'en motif. Chaper- 
ones, Dr. and Mrs. Charles Fraker, 
Dr. and Mrs. Leon A. Bradley. 

Continued on Page 6 



H0RT SHOW OPENS 
ON FRIDAY NOV. 6 



everywnere 



Instead of holding the Hort Show, 
annual fall exhibition, on the Amherst 
game weekend, as has been the prac- 
tice in past years, the committee, 
headed by Walter J. Hodder '37, an- 
nounces that it will take place on the 
following weekend, November I, 7, 
and 8. 

As in the past, the cage of the 
Physical Education Building will be 
entirely taken over by the Show. It 
will open at 3 p.m. on Friday, Novem- 
ber fi, and continue until 8 p.m. on 
Sunday, November 8. On Friday and 
Saturday it will remain open until 10 
p.m. Admission is free. 



'Night of January 16' 
Tryouts Postponed 

Tryouts and rehearsals for the 
Roister Doister winter play, "The 
Night of Janaury 1P»", will be delayed 
for another two weeks, according to 
an announcement from the office of 
Professor Frank Prentice Rand, di- 
rector of the dramatic group. 

The play is a new dramatic presen- 
tation and is still in the process of 
printing. Until the actual script is 
ready for the public, which will not 
be for at least two weeks, tryouts can- 
not be held. The announcement of the 
time for tryouts will appear in an 
early edition of the Collegian. 



O 19)6, Liccrrr & Myiis Tobacco Co. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECilAN. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1930 



.4* 

/nbassacbuee 




Collegian 



bjk 



LOUIS A. RREAIJLT '37. Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM 38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK '37. Associate Editor 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Campua Athletic. 

puii tP R SHIFF 37 Fditor JULIAN H. KATZEFF 38. Editor 

PHILIP B. 5>H IF* m. t.anoT iuvwitii I IfI_AVMAN '38 

RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 ^JSS M SWIREN 3« 

JAMES S. WALDMAN 37 ALFRED M. IffOM 3 \ 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 38 





CAMPUS CALENDAR 



MAURICE TONKIN 38 
MARY T. MEEHAN 3fl 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD 39 
THOMAS J. ENRIGHT 39 



RAYMOND B. JORDAN 37 

Stockbridge Correspondent* 
RALPH HARRIS S-37 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 

Financial Ad »Uer 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty AdTUe* 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 
BUSINESS BOARD 
KFNWOOD ROSS "37. Business Manager 
CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK 37. Advertising M.r. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr 

LL1 " WILLIAM B. FERGUSON "38. Subscription Mgr. 

Buetneae Assistants 
„,„,,.., R PRAHAM38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

mItCH^L F G n1mM^ DONALD L. SILVERMAN »_ 



^iTi^RIPTToNS »200 PER YEAR. SINGLB COPIES 10 CENTS 



stnce before 9 o'clock. Monday evening 



•tnce betore w o cioci. wn nu»> «»^ » . . 



AND THE SAME LABORATORIES 
Once upon a time a farmer attend- 
ed a hearing for a bill appropriating 
fund* for the maintenance of thi. 
College. Strongly in favor of the bill, 
he wa. wayl.yed by a leather-lunged 
exponent of the oppo.ition. The two 
locked force.. 

"Are you in favor of thi. bill? 
bellowed the viewer-with-alarm. 

"Ye.," the farmer meekly replied. 
"Do you know that men and wom- 
en matriculate together down there?" 
thundered the orator. 

The farmer wa. evidently .hocked. 
"No," he an.wered, "I never 
thought that the dean allowed any- 
thing like that to happen." 

"Well, he doe.. And not only that," 
roared the orator, a. he grabbed air 
for the final coup, "but do you know 
that both the men and women u.e the 
same curricula?" 

Thereupon the farmer fainted; but 
having .ufficiently recovered in the 
next few month, he enrolled in the 
College a. a fre.hman. 



Thursday, Oct. 29 

President's Reception 
Hort. Show committee meeting 
7.30 p.m. Band, Memorial Hall 
8.00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stockbridge, Room 114 
Friday, Oct. 30 
Phi Zeta 

Phi Beta Kappa, 4-H Club House 
Saturday, Oct. 31 

2.00 p.m. Football, Amherst, here 
4.30-7 p.m. Tea Dance 
8.00 p.m. Vic parties at fraternities 
Sunday, Nov. 1 

5.00 p.m. Vespers, Memorial Bldg., 
Prof. Rand, M.S.C. 
Tuesday, Nov. 3 

7.00 p.m. Outing Club meeting, 

French Hall 
8.00 p.m. Patterson Players 
WedneHday, Nov. 4 

Freshman Progress Reports 
Thursday, Nov. 5 
11.00 a.m. Convocation 
7.30 p.m. Band, Memorial Hall 
8.00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 

Stockbridge 
Alumni Radio Program 



Printed by The 



ifm^hfrv Press. 82 Nonh StreeTNorthampton, M««... Telephone 554 



CDITCaQIAL 



A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Francis Bacon 

Four years of college were meant to be absolute in the educa- 
tion of a man. Not many years ago, the man who held a bache 
lor's degree from a college or university was thoughtof M ibemg 
educated and having acquired the higher learning Tod *y .college 
degrees are more common, and there is a danger that unless .one 
gets the full benefit of a four-year course he : will not be > able to 
compete with his contemporaries Nevertheless the number ot 
people who attend colleges, even today, is relatively very smaH 
ThP maioritv of the popu ation never gets beyond a high scnooi 
education It would seem to follow, then, that the college man 
is suoDosed to be getting advanced education which will make him 
nte Slectuall superior to those who are either mentally or finan- 
dahv Sle toTudy beyond the grades. Because college ta — 
thine- reserved for a particular few, the man then, who is a «acne 
lor of Science, r a Bachelor of Arte, should be able to stand out 

" ^ofsome^errrweTave'been in a position to observe grad- 
uates of oTown college. What is our opinion of the Massachu- 
eUs State College grf duate We pass over thjj^^and 
snmptimes zive credit to the Master or Doctor. And paradoxical 
as^t n^v seem we are justified in our low estimate of the value 
of these degrees; for the average man upon whom a bachelor's de- 
aree will be conferred in June, will not have been educated, in 
fhefoTr years he spent here. A man, fitted for Wfe must get not 
a smattering of knowledge, the acquirement of a few tidbits of 
fnfoT-mation but he must learn thoroughly what he has time to 
SudvTfn four short years content in the knowled^ tot^a* 
forsaken quantity for quality of learning The State graduate, 
we fear, will have acquired only bits of information 

The situation here at State is unfortunate. It is such a 
system of education? as we have, that seriously lowers the signifi- 
cance of a co"we degree. Instead of turning out a student we 1- 
Sounded in a few subjects, the college fills his mind with the 
memory of a few confused facts. How much more advisable would 
H bTfor a man to carry four or five courses and thorough ^di- 
gest them, than to take six or seven and hope^ tha \ n 7 ti m l tf ns all 
how assimilate and synthesize his knowledge IntM uttoM Mffl 
around us offer an interesting contrast to our educational pro 

giam At Harvard University, the underg raduate carries four 
courses and his "Tutorial", which is related to his field hi he four 
courses, however, he gets a thorough training. Very 1 ,tue 01 

Sf5u?C0u?^ A iSiJkad (StrSt to the thoroughness of educa- 

L t Hazard which in respect to number of courses required 

tion at HaTvua ^mc v institution, is lackadaisical 

earning us uX acq^i edat ou/college. It is not faulty teaching 
learning "suaii> acq pressure of too many courses that 

^dMSKHwiS any student be expected to learn 
fhmWih the ml erial of six or seven courses? How can an in- 

?b liable to the scornful judgment of superficiality. 

Perhaps Massachusetts State is still m its adolescence Per- 
haos the college s still growing intellectually as well as physica - 
K and will lUmatelv reach that stage when its more mature out- 
ook wi?l direct its policies. We become hopeful when we realize 
hat Tt il our older collegiate colleagues who have the enlightened 
ZmJvS education through restriction in number and intensifica- 
Ho^ofcou'sesVVe should not be content with our present super- 
ftSilitv ftm£h lest we become a species of indolent thinkers. 
Let us ad an' attitude of tolerance of the present, only as we 
work for a more effective system in the future. 



BLIND DATE SITUATION 

Every lassie has her laddie 
None you see have I 
But can a body meet a body 
Through another guy? 

Smith College Weekly 
We'll say she can. Just call 132-W. 



A Half-Doxen Time*, "No" 
In a recent motion picture, a girl 
in the film received a telegram pur- 
portinb to be from Massachusetts Col- 
lege, Northampton, Mass. And was 
the telegram from a student? Of 
course not— it was from a professor. 
Question: Is it fair to think of 
M. S. C. as situated in Northampton 
when on any night of the week other 
than Saturday one can find it right 
here in Amherst? 



To the Victor Belong the Spoil* 
O tempora, o mores! An innocent 
(?) Amherst freshman was walking 
along Pleasant Street — just walking. 
Lo and behold! A Stockbridge stu- 
dent nonchalantly approached him 
from the opposite direction and with 
a sudden gesture whipped off the Am- 
herst frosh cap and as suddenly dis- 
appeared down the street. The ex- 
pression on the Amherst man's (?) 
face would have made the toughest 
gangster say "Pardon me, pleeze!" 

— Contributed 

OVERHEARD 

Frosh: I don't know anything about 
girl*. 

Frosh girl: You don't know ANY- 
THING about girl*? 

O.I No. 

F. G.: You're trying to learn, 

though, aren't you? 

— Contributed 



DAMNESIA 

What's to be done for the student 
who went to Smith College on a blind 
date, fell in love with the girl nt first 
sight, and then afterward for the life 
of him couldn't remember her name? 

ontributed 



Wise Owls Know Their Botany 

One of those collegiate night-owls 
who stay out all night and come in 
at six-thirty a.m. walked into Doc 
Torrey's botany class the other day 
without his set of botanical drawings. 

"You'd better get them," advised 
the good doctor. 

"I would have but I was financial- 
ly embarrassed," elucidated the owl. 

"You'd better get them," repeat- 
ed the doctor, "or you'll be scholastic- 
ally embarrassed." 

CLIPPINGS 

"Does one have many dates at col- 
lege?" inquired the Smith College 
freshman. "Oh yes, indeed," we re- 
plied, "there are men from Amherst, 
Yale, Harvard, Dartmouth, and, of 
course, Mass. State"-^who come down 
if they have cars (and if you know 
them). 

And if you please. 

Weekly Laughs 
Smith College Weekly 



Stockbridqe 



Footballers Lose 

The football team met their fir- 
defeat Friday at the hands of a strong 
Essex Aggie team. For the thirn 
time, the team played on a wet and 
slippery field that slowed down all 
plays and made passing an impost 
bility. The final score was 12 to 6, 
the deciding score coming late in th<- 
final period after a sustained running 
attack by the Essex team. The next 
game will be played October 31, at 
Williston Academy. 

A. T. G. House Party 
Alpha Tau Gamma announced this 
week that a house party is to be held 
Saturday evening following the Am- 
herst game. Elmer Smith is in charpe 
and has announced that Bill Prindle's 
orchestra will furnish the music. A 
large number of alumni are expected 
back for the game and dance. 

A. T. G. has to date receiv, d 
pledges from six freshmen and one 
senior. New members pledged arc. 
Wesley Nutter, Arnold Fischer, Eu- 
gene McDonough, William Boettchi r, 
Henry Griffin, Norwood Lincoln, and 
Rolf Heitman. 

Cross Country 

The time trials were i --it Friday 
over a wet, slippery track. Despite 
this handicap the winning time of 
15.05, turned in by Henry Mackie, 
was very fast. The rest of the squad 
finished fairly well bunched. 

Manager Fife announced that a 
meet with Amherst J. Vees and 
Freshmen had been arranged on the I 
Amherst course. 

K. K. House Party 

Kolony Klub plans an open house I 
Vic party for Saturday evening. Wil- 
bur Young is in charge of entertain- 
ment. Cards and dancing will be part] 
of the program. Refreshments will 
be served. Many alumni are expect- 
ed back for the occasion. 

Prof. Monosmith has accepted the 
invitation to be the Kolony Klub so- 
cial adviser for the current year. 



Chemistry Club 

The Chemistry Club wishes to in- 
vite all students of chemistry to hear| 
Dr. Linus Jones of the Botany De- 
partment on "What Chemistry Means I 
to the Plant Physiologist." Goes?- 
mann Auditorium, Thursday, October 
29, at 7:30 p.m. 



Announcements 



Combined Music Clubs 

The combined Music Clubs will pre-l 
sent a musical program to be followed! 
by a vie party in the Memorial Buildf 
ing, on Friday, November 13, at 7:3(l| 
o'clock. 



It's The Rung Way 

Recently Dean Burns was seen try- 
ing to mount a ladder. When ques- 
tioned as to the reason, he replied in 
his own inimitable fashion, "I'm trying 
to get up in the world". 

— Contributed 



INFORMAL TEA DANCE 

DRILL HALL 
Saturday Afternoon 
from 4.30 to 7 p.m. 

Ed. Petrucelli's orchestra will play 



BEAT AMHERST 



BOOTERS BEAT TUFTS 
PLAY AMHERST FRIDAY 



Senior Pictures 

All the seniors who have not hadl 
their pictures taken will please reportl 
at the Mt. Pleasant Inn (formerly! 
Davenport Inn) sometime this afterj 
noon between 1-5:30 p.m. for their sit-l 
ting. This is the last opportunity for| 
the taking of Index pictures. 

Mitchell F. NeJame 1 
Business Manapt'l 
Continued on Pa/?pfl 



ATTEND THE 



Amherst Game Rally 

Band - Bonfire - Speakers 



TIME: Tuesday Evening at 7 p.m. 
PLACE: ©pp. Physical Education Bldg. 



Breaking into the win column again 
l,. t ,t Saturday afternoon the '36 edition 
of the Briggsmen toppled Tufts 2-1 
in Medford. This was the third State 
| soccer victory of the season. 

With the State team hampered with 
minor injuries, the opponents were 
about evenly matched. Scoring oc- 
( urred for the Maroon and White in 
the third and fourth periods, while the 
,) umbos scratched the score board 
I once in the second. 

Storing in the game started when 
l('ornwell of Tufts booted into the 
I goal in the second period, playing 
I against the wind. 

In this period, although the States- 
men shot frequently with the wind 
I they were unable to register. 

In the third period, however, play- 
ling against the wind again, the 
Maroon and White evened up the 
(score. Podolak, State's high scoring 
[fullback began the team's scoring 
[after the period had aged twenty 
[minutes. In the next period, after 
[but two minutes of play Osley clinched 
[the game for State, shooting directly 
|into the goal. 
The summary: 

MacDonald 

Stratton 

Gorman 

Mathews 

Dunn 

Lister 

Yarjian 

Harris 

Toon 

Cornwell 

Guezewycz 

AMHERST TOMORROW 

Tomorrow, playing at home, the 
Boccermen will meet the Sabrina team 
[for the sixth time since the beginning 
jf the Amherst-State soccer series in 
1930. The State team will meet the 
sual strong Amherst et-up and will 
ittempt to chalk up their second win 
jf the series. So far this season the 
Imherst team has played three games, 
posing to Harvard and Wesleyan, and 
iowning Dartmouth 3-2. Outstand- 
ing for Amherst are Captain West, a 
lalfhack, and Olds right wing. The 
state lineup will probably run as it 
ias in the past. The probable Am- 
lerst lineup is as follows: Simpson g, 

L-hoefield rf, Jones If, West rh, Ray 
ch, Waldgridge lh, Olds ri, Schnuppel 
ri, Lawton cf, Jeppson li, Smith lo. 




Benjamin 


S 


Podolak 


rf 


Adams, Conway 


If 


Kennedy 


rh 


Couper 


ch 


Buzzee, Adams 


lh 


Cain 


ro 


Lyman, Silverma 


n ri 


Kodda 


cf 


bsley 


li 


bolub, Kyle 


lo 




1RIDMEN BOW 
TO W.P.I. 7-0 



Playing before a large Dads' Day 
audience last Saturday, the Statesmen 
fell 7 to before Worcester Tech for 
[he first time since 1930. Worcester 
khulked up its seven markers early in 
the 4th period when Elliott went over 
for W.P.I, and Forkey converted. 

The Engineers brought an unusually 
ftrong team to State whose aggressive 
play caught the Maroon and White 
pmpletely by surprise although the 
jSttitcHmen had several scoring oppor- 
tunities which they failed to capitalize. 
Early in the first stanza the Tech- 
pdam threatened at the State goal 
v hrn Forkey, Germaine, Gustafson 
ba.ss-lfueral combination brought the 
fail t.. the State 10-yard line. 

In the second period W.P.I, again 

* * "ipted to score but a try for a field 

by Forkey failed. After this, 

|t>*' Vtri the Towle, Brown, Niden 

ambtiN brought State's ball to the 

ter 30-yard line where Niden 

Pcked to Germaine on the 5-yard 

p r 'P« Again in the 2nd period the 

arne < f ,mbine brought the pigskin 

fitlii. 20 yards of the Worcester goal. 

IB i he third period State threatened 

11 .lure but after an attempted field 

1 \v Fisher, W.P.I, regained the 

l was in this quarter Sievers 

pa removed on account of injuries. 



Harriers Run At 

Home Saturday 

Will Amherst be the team to break 
the State cross-country team's record 
of fourteen straight wins on the home 
course? A win over Amherst next 
Saturday will mark the close of the 
sixth successive season in which the 
State harriers have not been defeated 
at home. 

Since Coach Derby took over the 
State harriers in 1922, they have 
beaten Amherst eight times and lost 
four times. There was no contest two 
years. The last State defeat at the 
hands of Amherst was in 1931 when 
we were defeated 21-36. Since then 
the scores have all been in favor of 
Mass. State: 1932, 18-37; 1933, no 
race; 1934, 15-48; and 1935, 27-30. 

Amherst has one of their best teams 
in years and will come here unde- 
feated, with wins over Tufts, Spring- 
field, and the Coast Guard. They 
have three outstanding men in Cow- 
ing, who placed first over Proctor of 
State in last year's contest, in Capt. 
"Proc" Twitchell, who placed third 
last year, and in Moyer, Sabrina 
freshman star of last year. 

The Statesmen were a much im- 
proved team in their 15-49 win over 
Worcester Tech last Saturday. Pick- 
ard and NeJame of State led all the 
way and crossed the finish line in a 
five man tie with Little, Sampson 
and Ingram, all of State. Beaumont, 
who placed sixth for State, showed 
much improvement as did Reade who 
placed seventh for State. 

Roving Reporter 

The annual Amherst -State football 
game brings on the usual problem of 
trying to predict the winner on the 
part of various people in the sur- 
rounding township of Amherst and 
environs. 

In answer to the question "Would 
you be willing to give us your opin- 
ion as to the outcome of the State- 
Amherst game this Saturday?" the 
following opinions were brought out: 

Doctor William Ross: I would not! 
I know when I'm well off. If State 
plays as it did last Saturday, I'd bet- 
ter stay home. 

Doctor Pop Serex: Heh, heh! It's 
a toss-up. From what I've seen, Am- 
herst will win. 

Dr. Frederick Cutler: I wish I 
could — I'd bet money on it. Ask me 
an easy question. 

Miss Gallond: I hope the best team 
wins. I'll be there for Mass. State, 
though. I hope we get the breaks this 
time and win. 

Fir" Department: NO, INDEED! 
If we spoke for either team, the other 
side would bum up. 



PIGSKIN PARADK 

Michigan State-Boston College State 

beans Gil Dobie's Bostonians. 
Purdue-Carnegie Tech -Boilermakers 

make Technicians boil. 
Co/um6Ja-Cornell Lions will feed on 

the Ithaca lads. 
Pjtf-Fordham — Panthers will take the 

rams by the horns. 
Prj/u-emn-Harvard Another Crimson 

loss to the tune of Tiger Rag. 
Ohio State-Notre Dame Irish eyes are 

not smiling. 
Va/e-Dartmouth The Bulldog bites 

the Indian; lo, the poor Indian 
Perm State-Syracuse Nittany Lions 

will peel the orange. 
Holy Cross-Temple Owls not wise 

enough. 
Penn-Navy — Quakers will get the 

Navy's goat. 
Armv-Colgate Mules kick Kerr's Red 

Raiders. 
Texas Christian -Baylor -Texas Chris- 
tians will make it unberable for the 

bears. 
Alabama - Kentucky — Alabama will 

drive the Kentucky Kernels nuts. 
Ten n. -Georgia — Tenn will repeat its 

victory performance of last Sat. 
Was/w'ngton-Oregon — Washington will 

also cross the Oregon River with 

ease. 
Ca/j/ornta-Washington State — The 

Sunny Staters will cast a shadow on 

Washington's chances. 
Amherat-Mass. State — A tosH-up; but 

then anything may happen. 
Minn. -Northwestern — 22nd victory for 

the Gophers at the Wildcat's ex- 
pense. 

SUNNY SIDE UP 

Sports Editor 
Massachusetts Collegian 

With the Amherst game coming 
next Saturday, simple mathematics 
shows that Mass. State should win by 
two touchdowns. 

The answer is arrived at in this 
manner: Connecticut State defeated 
Brown 27-0 and edged M.S.C. 13-0. 
Harvard defeated Brown 28-0 and 
swamped Amherst 38-6. By these 
scores Harvard and Conn. State are 
shown to be of equal strength. There- 
fore Mass. State should defeat Am- 
herst by three touchdowns. Allowing 
for an error of six points it would be 
safer to predict a two touchdown win 
over the town rivals. 

A. Nye '40 



STATESMEN PREPARE 
FOR AMHERST TILT 



THE COACHES TALK IT OVER 




Lou Bush 



Kb Caraway 



Bill Frigard 



By James Woodruff 
Special from the Amherst Studvnt 

After failing to annex the first leg 
of the Little Three title at Wesleyan 
last Saturday, a determined Amherst 
eleven will face Mass. State on the 
latter's field Saturday in an effort to 
retain the town football championship 
which it won last season. 

When the Sabrinas face the Cara- 
waymen, Coach Jordan will have a 
wealth of backfield material to use, 
having four backfields of nearly equal 
ability. Also the line, led by Captain 
Tom Kennedy, which was green at 
the beginning of the season, has 
gained a great deal of experience and 
will take the field with all the regulars 
in the lineup. 

In scrimmage this week the sopho- 
more backfield composed of Surman, 
Joys, Davidson, and Vic Pattengill 
shows up well, gaining consistently by 
both the running and the aerial 
routes. This combination will prob- 
ably see a lot of action Saturday, al- 
though the starting outfit will likely 
be the same as started against Wes- 
leyan, with Snowball, K. Pattengill, 
Michel and Brown carrying the ball. 
The probable starters in the forward 
wall will be Kennedy, center; Wil- 
kening and Colucci, guards; Palmer 
and Land, tackles; Coey and Switzer, 
end. 



KAPPA SIGMA WINS 
HONOR CUP AGAIN 



With secret practice sessions the 
order of the day, the t'arawaymen 
are practicing daily intent on winning 
the proverbial town championshipp 
when they meet Amherst next Satur- 
day afternoon on Alumni Field. After 
the upset against Worcester, the team 
will be out for a win from Amherst. 

Coach Caraway is no doubt stress- 
ing fundamentals and a stronger 
aerial attack in a secret scrimmage, 
with which to meet Amherst Saturday. 
Yet with only one win to their credit 
so far the team will have quite a way 
to travel if they are to register a win 
over their town rivals. 

The State lineup will no doubt be 
the same as it has been so far this 
season. Notable for his absence, how- 
ever, will be Fred Sievers, outstanding 
guard of the past two seasons, who 
was forced to leave the field last 
Saturday after an added injury to his 
already weakened leg. 

The Niden-Towle-Brown combina- 
tion functioned as usual Saturday in 
the backfield with Hauck in at quar- 
terback. Bullock, Filipkowski, Cze- 
lusniak and Steff will see WTVioe, 
Captain Rossiter in the pivot position 
will be flanked by Bernstein on the 
right and Linden or Roberge on his 
left. Gray and Fisher will fill the 
tackle positions with Mosely and 
l.;iph.nn first string wing men. 



-. , ■ -. 



Kappa Sigma won again the first 
place in the interfraternity contest 
for a college year. The place was won 
with a decided distance between it and 
the second fraternity, Alpha Epislon 
Pi. The contest for second and third 
place cups was closer although there 
was no question as to the positions. 

The three cups newly awarded by 
the Interfraternity Council were pre- 
sented by the Dean to the presidents 
of the three houses in convocation 
Thursday. These three cups for first, 
second, and third places are to be 
permanent trophies to be awarded 
each year. 



DEBATE ON ELECTION 

Continued from Page 1 

of their presentations, John Hoar, 

Francis Thomas and Albert Thomas. 

The Democratic consists of Richard 

Desmond, Walter Lewis, and Max 

Lilly. 

On previous years of presidential 
elections, similar debates have been 
held here, and have been successful. 
The wide interest shown in political 
matters in the recent straw ballot 
conducted by the Collegian is also 
partly responsible for the decision of 
the debating club to undertake this 
project. It is felt, moreover, such a 
debate will clarify the issues and be 
of assistance to those who have hazy 
notions of the campaign. 








mERD ART 

516 COLLEGE STADIUMS' 

IN THE COUNTRY WITH A TOTAL 
fEATlNG CAPACITY OF 5Jfc8,;00 OR 
*N AVERAGE OF IO.OOO PER SCHOOL .' 




. .-.-' :■■■; : :-;-.vXv» • ■ . 



C0ACH"SUP"rMWGAr4'y GALLOPING 
GAELS OF ST. MARYX COLLEGE CAL} 
MUST TRAVEL OVER 30 WILE? OF 
LAND. 20 WILES OF WATER. AND PAST 
THRPOGH THREE COUNTIES AND 
METROPOLITAN CITIES IN ORDER 
TO REACH iHEiR. "HOrAE.' FIELD. 
*£ZAR JlADiUrA. SAN FRANCISCO' 



SIGNALS OVER. 
./i'KE 
ItCAWN' TOVJAR[> 
eER*£L£Y/ 





UNIVERSITY OF CHATTANOOGA, 
rTuDfcNnS - HOLD A CONTEST 
EACH YFJVR to SELECT THE 

BACHELOR.'* LWStt/ 



C*r«»>l l; 



A. T. WUaon W. E. Londergan 

THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Telephone 554 Northampton, Mam. 



• • t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2», 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER M, 1»3H 






"We Are in the Midst of An Empire- 
Breaking Era," Asserts Prof. Bonn 




It is certain that Professor Moritz 
J. Bonn, the eminent German econ- 
omist who spent three days of last 
Week on the campus, cannot complain 
of being kept Wto during his visit 
here, nor can anyone in the college 
complain that he was not given suf- 
ficient opportunities to hear the dis- 
tinguished visitor. Indeed, if after 
three days packed with numerous in- 
formal talks, formal speeches and pri- 
vate conferences, Professor Honn left 
with an unimpaired throat, he can pat 
himself on the back for being a man 
of great endurance. 

Those who came into close contact 
with 1'rofessor Bonn found that he 
baa quite an interesting personality. 
Despite the seriousness of the sub- 
ject he discussed, an Irrepressible hu- 
mour coupled with a twinkling of 
the eyes popped out wherever his 
quick wit found the occasion. 

During the private conferences, 
when he was asked many different 
types of questions, he displayed a 
characteristic thoroughness and in- 
cisiveness in clearing up ambiguous 
t.rms and cutting right down to the 
fundamental issue. 

When asked whether economics 
could solve current ills of the world 
Professor Honn answered that a 
knowledge of economics could not 
solve all the ills'; however, without a 
knowledge of economics there could 
be little advancement in the solution 
of the great problems. 

In his main address on The Inter- 
national Significance of the Colonial 
Problem which he delivered at con- 
vocation, Professor Honn showed the 
diminishing importance of colonies 
in solving the economic problems of 
great countries. 

"We are in the midst of an em- 
pire-breaking era," he asserted. 
"After the Revolution the Americans 
believed that colonies were no good." 
In the territorial changes following 
the World War what were formerly 
regarded as colonies were then re- 
garded as mandates or trusts. 

"During the last five or six years 
there has been a movement of expan- 
sion through colonies," continued Pro- 
fessor Bonn. This trend, he stated, 
is contrary to the real trend through- 
out the world. 

"There is a tendency," remarked 
Professor Honn "to self-sufficiency 
among the countries." A nation can 
become self-sufficient, he pointed out 
through isolation and by lowering the 
standards of living. 

In conclusion Professor Bonn pre- 
dicted that if those countries in a 
favorable colonial position restrained 
the outflow of the raw materials of 
their colonies to other countries, 
there would be an explosion in Eu- 
rope. 



Freshman Co-eds Average 64 Inches 
Huskiest Freshman Hits 168 Pounds 



As a conglomerate collection, Mass. 
State co-eds apparently do not change 
much from year to year. Take the 
average freshman co-ed of last year, 
for example. She was a demure young 
maiden who tipped the scales at 123 
pounds and looked at the campus 
from a height of 64 inches. This 
year's entering co-eds averaged the 
same height as those of last year. 
Their average weight was 124 pounds, 
one pound more than their predeces- 
sors boasted. 

The weight range in each class, 
however, is different, and laurels for 
both the slightest and the huskiest en- 
tering freshman go to the present 
sophomores. They boasted a healthy 
young Amazon of 182 pounds, while 
their wispiest frosh scaled only 8i» 
pounds. The heaviest co-ed of HMO. 



however, weighs only 168 pounds, 
while the lightest is a comparative 
husky of 95 pounds. If variety is the 
spice of life, then life seems to be los- 
ing some of its fizz. 

When it comes to height, the class 
of 1940 claims the rangiest co-ed with 
a height of 6i) inches. The best last 
year's freshmen could do was 68 
inches. In each year the shortest frosh 
could put on a tophat and walk under 
a table. She is only 58 inches tall. 

But take a look at the average girl 
who has been here a year. She now 
weighs 128.5 pounds, a gain of some 
5.5 pounds over her weight when she 
entered. And her height? That has in- 
creased from 64 inches to 65.5. It 
seems to prove that not only does col- 
lege broaden one, but it also lengthens 
one. 



COLLEGE FORMALLY 
ACCEPTS NEW FIELD 



At the dedication of the new Wom- 
en's athletic field October 23, which 
was held in the cage due to inclement 
weather, Mr. Paul Edwards, head of 
the W.l'.A. project in Massachusetts, 
presented the field and Mrs. Lottie A. 
Leach from the Trustees and Advisory 
Council accepted it. 

Dean Machmer, in the absence of 
President Baker gave the address of 
welcome and Dr. Dorothy S. Ains- 
worth, of the physical education de- 
partment at Smith College spoke on 
the uses of the field. 

Under the direction of Mrs. Adeline 
Hicks, a colorful pageant, portraying 
the construction of the field and the 
uses to which it shall be put, com- 
pleted the program. Each sorority- 
represented a separate part in the 
process of construction in the form of 
a dance. Country and Morris dances 
were given by the classes of '.°>9 and 
'40. The entire program was under 
the direction of Mrs. Adeline Hicks 
and her assistant Miss Ethel Blatch- 
ford. 



ganization, announced today. The 
meeting is scheduled to begin at 7:15. 

Several important matters will be 
considered at this meeting. An exten- 
sion service staff member will be the 
speaker. 

All present and former 4-H Club 
members and those interested in 4-H 
cjub work in both the two-year and 
four-year courses are eligible for 
membership in the M.S.C. 4-H Club, 
and are invited to be present at this 
meeting. 




Alpha Lambda Mu 

A Hallowe'en party is planned for 
Sunday evening. 

Phi Zeta 

Muriel Brackett '34 was married 
last week, 

Phi Zeta is holding a buffet sup- 
per and Hallowe'en party Friday 
night. Mr. and Mrs. Hawley and Mr. 
and Mrs. Gaskill will be chaperones. 

A dinner was held in Lord Jeffrey 
Inn, for the Dads, last Saturday night. 

There was a meeting of the Moth- 
ers' Club of Phi Zeta last Saturday 
evening after the luncheon served at 
the sorority house. 

Ruth Wood '37 has returned to col- 
lege after a period of illness. 

Many of the Alumnae will be re- 
turning for the Alumnae banquet. 
Florence Stoeber, Agnes McMahon 
both of New York, Mrs. Ben Betts of 
Bennington, Vt., Marie Dow, Betsy 
Wordon, Dolly Lesquier, Lucy Kings- 
ton and Marion Jones all from Spring- 
field, will be among those present. 

Sigma Beta Chi 

The seniors are going to give a 
Hallowe'en party this Friday. 

A Dad's day luncheon was served 
at the house Saturday. 

One of the German entertainers 
was a guest for dinner Tuesday. 

Lambda Delta Mu 

On Dad's Day, October 24, after 
the game, a turkey dinner was served 
at the sorority house for those Dads 
present. 

Featuring the Hallowe'en motif, 
the annual Abbey tea was sponsored 
by the sorority on Wednesday. Ruth 
E. Wood '38, was in charge. 

The sorority will have a "vie" party 
at the house on November 6. Ar- 
rangements are under the direction of 
Louise Rutter '38, social chairman. 

Visiting at the sorority house over 
Dad's Day week-end were Harriet An- 
drus '36, Mildred Hovey '35, Mary 
Emma Kingston '35, and Betty Barr 
'35. 



Nutrition Work 
Tests to Begin 



Matinee 2:30 Evening 6:30 8:30 



College 4 H Club 
Meets Wednesday 

A meeting of the Massachusetts 
State College 4-H Club will be held 
on Wednesday evening, November 4 
at the Farley 4-H Club House, Doro- 
thy Decatur '38, secretary of the or- 



Fri.-Sat., Oct. 30-31 

[Fred Mat-Murray Jack Oaku 

Jean Parker in 

TEXAS 

RANGERS 

— other feature — 
Edward Arnold in 
"MKKT NERO WOLFF." 

also — 



Q. T. V.: Helen Downing and her 
band. Informal. Decorations to be 
kept secret. Chaperones, Professor 
and Mrs. William Sanctuary, Dr. and 
Mrs. Monroe Freeman. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon: Statesmen. 
Dress optional. Decorations in Hal- 
lowe'en motif. Chaperones, Profes- 
sor and Mrs. Walter Eisenmenger and 
friends. 



[Pete Smith 



Cartoon! 



It-K-R-R-K 

With the football season and presi- 
dential campaign in full swing, you 
don't want to be annoyed with 
STATIC. Let us repair your Radio 
or give you a price for turn-in value. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

Hardware Electrical Supplies 

35 Pleasant Street Amherst, Mass. 



Sun. -Moii. -Turn., Nov. 1-2-3 

William Powell Carole Lombard| 
in 

"MY MAN 

GODFREY" 

— and these — 

Technicolor Musical 

Popeye Pathe News 



Theta Chi: Johnny Green and his 
orchestra of Worcester. Dress op- 
tional. Hallowe'en decorations. Chap- 
erones, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sievers, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Gaskill. 



With freshmen women as subject -:, 
a human nutrition project has begun 
on the campus under the direction of 
Dr. Helen S. Mitchell of the Expeii- 
ment Station. Its purpose is to study 
the nutritional status of college wom- 
en with particular attention to vita- 
min C and its influence on gener i] 
health. 

Important in This Climate 

The Massachusetts State College 
project is stressing vitamin C in its 
relation to nutritional condition be- 
cause vitamin C is the one to which 
persons in this climate must give mote 
attention, Dr. Mitchell explained. 
Vitamin C is needed every day be- 
cause it is not stored in the body to 
any extent. It occurs chiefly in fre.^h 
fruits and vegetables which are less 
easily available at certain times of 
the year. 

Vitamin C is also of particular in- 
terest because Dr. Fellers and his as- 
sociates on the campus have been do- 
ing much work on the food sources 
of the vitamin. Cornell and Penn- 
sylvania State College, which were 
recently visited by Dr. Mitchell, are 
doing research on vitamin C in hu- 
mans. 

New Methods Used 

New methods have recently been 
perfected sufficiently to make it pos- 
sible to use them in this nutrition 
program. Of special note is the Dall- 
dorrf capillary fragility apparatus for 
determining the amount of negative 
pressure necessary to produce a skin 
discoloration. This is believed to have 
a correlation to the amount of vita- 
min C in the system or to the gen- 
eral nutrition. 

The Willoughby system of anthro- 
pometric measurements such as are 
used at Mount Holyoke College are to 
be used to help determine physical 
fitness. Food records are to be kept 
by the girls for two weeks to give 
a general idea of the amount of vita- 
min C they are getting. 

May Continue Four Years 

The study may continue through- 
out the college life of the women in 
the class of 1940, Dr. Mitchell said, 
for several tests on the same indi- 
vidual will be especially helpful. Dr. 
Florence Jenney of the College 
Health Department is cooperating in 
making some of the examinations, and 
Miss Oreana Merriam is in charge of 
the West Experiment Station labora- 
tory. 



Wed. -Th urn., Nov. 4-5 

Herbert Marshall 

Ruth Chatterton in 

"GIRL'S 
DORMITORY" 

with Simone Simon 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Complete line of 
COLLEGE SEAL JEWELRY 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

with your name printed free 

50 for 89c 25 for 89c 

50 for 1.30 25 for 1.45 

See our samples ORDER NOW 



AFTER THE BIG GAME 

CELEBRATE AT 

GRANDCNICO*/ 

RESTAURANT 

Dine, Wine and Dance 
The finest in quality 

Foods and Beverages 

Just below the Town Hall 



Today, Thurs., Oct. 29 

|Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy in 
"TO MARY, WITH LOVE" 

■ ■■ HM! 



HALLOWE'EN 

EVERYTHING FOR THE NIGHT 



Candles 
Aprons 
Masks 
Stickers 



Napkins 
Table Covers 
Nut Cups 
Skeletons 



Costumes 

Lanterns 

Hats 

Noise Makers 



Place Cards 

Tallies 

Table Decorations 

Invitations 



JKMES A. LOWELL, BoohtUer 



YEAR PLAN CONDEMNED BY 
MERCURE AS "ALL THE BUNK" 



THE NATIONAl SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our Iiljfch -dunned work 
Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



NEW ARRIVALS 

Worsted tex Suits $37.50 Saxon weave Suits $32.50 

Michael Stern Suits $25 to $35 

Topcoats $19.50 to $32.50 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five yean 



Russia's five-year plan is "all the 

,,k," Joseph E. Mercure, engineer 

th the General Electric Company, 

,tl in convocation this morning. 

\lr. Mercure, who spent three years 

i Russia from 1930 through 1932, 

,, "We have all heard of Russia's 

, year plan, how Russia is being 

..unformed from a simple agricul- 

;. ,1 country into the world's great- 

I industrial and agricultural nation. 

,V,41, I am here to tell you that it is 

11 the bunk. 

Al.o "The Bunk" 

"We have heard of Russia's great 
...tural resources, her immense supply 
,f timber, oil, and minerals. We have 
jeard about her largest water power 
station in the world, the largest steel 
lull-, the largest tractor plant. Every- 
thing the largest and greatest in the 
,-orld. This, too, is the bunk." 

There is work for everyone and the 
Inhabitants smile and appear healthy, 
m t in reality they are hungry, cold, 
joorly clothed and live in crowded 
:onditions, the speaker stated. This 
„ .lue, he pointed out, to the destruc- 
tion of livestock in 1929 which has 
-aused a shortage of meat, eggs, but- 
(er, cheese and soap. 

Instances Cited 

Mr. Mercure cited many instances 
,-here he was accorded favors by 
imply "tipping" natives with soap 
)r tobacco which he had been per- 
mitted to bring into the country with- 
out duty. He told of entire families 
iho went without soap from one year 
lo another because the country did 
lot have the fats and oils to spare 
lor soap making. A half cake of 
|oap, he said, would bring him vege- 

ibles enough for several meals. 
"The five-year plan of Russia was 
failure because it was fantastic, 

npossfble, and because the brains of 

le country opposed it," Mr. Mer- 
|ure continued. "We have read of 

le arrest of many Russian engineers 
\n charges of sabotage. Sabotage, 
my opinion, has been the most suc- 
lewfttl occupation in Russia since the 
]917 Revolution. 

ORIGINAL PLAN GOOD 

"The original five-year plan pre- 
pared in Lenin's time was a fairly 
aund and feasible plan based on the 
(porta of a commission of scientific 
ien who started a survey in 1915, by 
rder of the Czar, to determine the 
esources and the possibilities of de- 
Icloping Russia. This original five- 
|ear plan was sound and if carried 
Jt. Russia would today be in a much 
letter condition. But Stalin decided 
iat they had to improve the plan and 
everything on a large scale. The 
<ult was a failure. Why? Because 
e majority of the people were not 
-ympathy with the government," 
concluded. 



First Meeting of 
Math Club Nov. 4 



College Candy Kitchen 



A NICE TREAT AT THE SARRIS 

thin week-end with your friends. Lunch or Dinner or refreshments. 

Home Made Pastry. 



The first of the annual series of 
Math Club meetings will be held next 
Wednesday evening at 7 P.M. in the 
Math building. Raymond B. Jordan 
'37 will give a talk on "Some Approxi- 
mations in the Field of Mathematics." 

The Math Club plans to hold about 
two meetings every month. Meetings 
are to be conducted as in past years 
wholly by students who will present 
talks each week. All students who are 
interested in Mathematics are wel- 
come. The club is under the direction 
of Professor Moore. 



WAUGH DISCUSSES 
NEW ART EXHIBIT 
IN MEN. BUILDING 



PLAYED AT 
SOCIAL UNION 



STRATT0N REVIEWS RECITAL 
BY YOUNG ARTISTS' GROUP 



Discussing the subject of etchings 
with reference to the collection now on 
display in the Memorial Building, 
Professor Frank A. Waugh presented 
a talk last Tuesday afternoon as the 
second program of the Fine Arts 
Series. 

Intimate Nature of Etchings 

Professor Waugh stressed the inti- 
mate nature of etchings. "An etching 
is like a fine piece of lace or poetry," 
he said, "to be studied quietly and 
familiarly. Delicacy and refinement 
are its outstanding characteristics." 
Etching, he remarked, lends itself to 
portraying lyrical and sentimental 
landscapes, intimate, personal studies 
of human beings, and subtler effects 
even to the point of moralization. In 
all these respects he likened etchings 
to the poetry of Robert Frost. 

To illustrate the different types of 
etching to which he referred Profes- 
sor Waugh pointed out examples on 
the walls of Memorial Hall. Lyrical 
landscapes are found in a group by C. 
J. Young, including Where Memory 
Lingers, Robes of Ermine, and Winter 
Stillness, all rural winter scenes. Sev- 
eral hunting pictures by Churchill 
Ettinger were cited as personal, indi- 
vidual studies. Among them are Lone 
Gunner and Right Fly. 

Reveal Character 

Pointing out that an artist's etch- 



MEET AT 



BARSELO TTI'S CAFE 

BALLANTINE'S ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 
Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



Sheaffer, Parker and Waterman FOUNTAIN PENS 
Die Stamped Stationery Daily and Sunday Papers Delivered 

A.J.Hastings ■"BBSST - 17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 



Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
>rk called for and delivered Telephone 828 




By Frank B. Stratton 



Two Members of Young Student Group Playing Bass Recorder and Fiddle 



Home Ec Given 

Research Funds 



Receipt of a grant from the Com- 
mittee on Scientific Research of the 
American Medical Association by the 
Department of Home Economics Re- 
search at Massachusetts State College 
was announced this week. 

These funds will be used in the 
further study of metabolic changes 
associated with galactose-induced cat- 
aract in rats. Reports of certain 
phases of this research, which has 
been in progress for several years 
under the direction of Helen S. 
Mitchell, have been published. 

Blood and urine sugar changes oc- 
curring in rats on cataract producing 
diets are being studied as well as 
dietary factors effecting the rate of 
cataract development. 



ORGANIZATION OF 
NEW PSYCHOLOGY 
CLUB ON CAMPUS 



ings reveal something of his charac- 
ter, Professor Waugh called attention 
to a group of pictures of the sea by 
Frederick L. Owen, who sailed the sea 
for years and is an authority on de- 
tails of ships. Similarly Irwin D. 
Hoffman, who is deeply interested in 
Mexican life, is represented in this 
collection by several prints on Mexi- 
can subjects. Louis Lozowick has ex- 
pressed the theme of the new artists 
in Storm Over Manhattan, that urban 
life in the big city is the proper 
source of art, rather than the rural 
scenes of the past. 

The exhibition of prints, largely 
etchings, now placed in the Memorial 
Building comes from the Associated 
American Artists of New York City. 



A Psychology Club is being organ- 
ized by the student body of Massachu- 
setts State College for the purpose of 
offering to the students interested an 
opportunity to hear lectures on sub- 
jects of wide psychological interest. 

For a long time the need for such 
an organization has been felt, and 
much discussion has been forthcoming 
relative to the forming of a club. 
Plans, though tentative, are already 
under way for bringing of special 
speakers to this campus for the pur- 
pose of addressing the students on va- 
rious topics in the field of psychology. 

Notice of the time and place of the 
first meeting will be announced in 
next week's Collegian. 



Wrought Iron and (ilnsN 
Flower Containers 

Ideal for ivy, bitter sweet, inch 
plant, etc. 

miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



The Young Artists' Croup, of Ber- 
lin, was presented last Tuesday night 
as the second offering of the Social 
Union this season. The program of in- 
strumental and vocal music of the six- 
teenth century was presented in a 
pleasantly informal manner by a 
group of serious young musicians who 
are obviously in thorough sympathy 
with their music, and have mastered a 
rather difficult means of expression. 

Excellent Medium 

The music, which seems at first to 
display rather too little variety and 
contrast, is actually an excellent me- 
dium for the expression of the artistic 
ideals of the time. The artist had 
achieved an independence and an in- 
tegrity which, coupled with a highly 
developed craftsmanship, produced 
works of real character and worth. A 
new note of dignity is introduced into 
music, which is still pleasingly offset 
by a slight uncertainty, hoth in the 
music itself and in the limitations of 
imperfectly developed instruments. 

The quartet of voices was eminently 
satisfactory, both in solo and in en- 
semble, and carried the spirit of the 
music admirably, while the various in- 
struments, woodwinds, strings, and 
harpsichord, showed their ability to 
perform in solo groups or to subordi- 
nate themselves to the voices. 

Solo Passages Interesting 

Possibly the most interesting num- 
bers were those in which the different 
instruments could be heard alone: the 
set of French dances by the recorders, 
the Froberger Toccata for harpsi- 
chord, and the unaccompanied vocal 
quartet. The full ensemble lacked in 
clarity, partly because of the limita- 
tions of the stage and of the instru- 
ments themselves. 

The young performers are to be con- 
gratulated on their success in explor- 
ing a little-known field of music, and 
in making their findings known. The 
College has been fortunate in hearing 
them. 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St.. Northampton 



Maw. State 




We stock breeches, riding boot*. 

Suede Jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



FREE 



A pair of genuine British-made Full Leather 
Lined $9.00 Brogue Oxfords 

TO THE PLAYKR 
MAKING THE WINNING POINT 

in the 

MASS. STATE- AMHERST (iAME 
SATURDAY 



Bolles Shoe Store 



HYOEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



75c 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



THE MASSAC HI SKITS COLLEGIAN. THl'KSUAY, OCTOBER 29. 1936 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



NETTLETON SHOES 

For style and good looks, we suggest Nettleton Shoes. 
Try a pair of Algonquins. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Continued from Page 2 
Fine Art* Council 

On Tuesday, November 8, at 4:30 
p.m. in the Memorial Building, the 
Fine Arts Council will present Robert 
Francis, author, who will read from 
his recently published book "Stand 
With Me Here". 



Vesper* 

Professor Frank Prentice Rand, 
head of the English Department, will 
speak on Something Unsullied at the 
coming Vespers Service which is to be 
held in the Memorial Building on Sun- 
day at 5:00 P.M. 



Hort. Show Invitation 

The Hort Show Committee extends 
a cordial invitation to the friends and 
parents of the students to visit the 
Fall Hort Show to be held the week- 
end of November 6, 7, and 8. 



al of the Band tonight at 7:30 in 
the Memorial Building. Only those 
present at tonight's rehearsal will be 
allowed to play during the Amherst 
Game and the radio broadcast. 
Bacteriology Club 

The Bacteriology Club will meet 
Tuesday evening, November 3, at the 
Farley 4-H Club House. Following 
a business meeting Dr. Fuller will 
give a talk on "The Nature of Re- 
search Work Going on in Experiment 
Stations". Juniors who are planning 
to take advanced courses in Bacteriol- 
ogy are invited to join as associate 
members, and for further information 
may see Gertrude Hadro '38. 

Refreshments will be served. 

All seniors who have not had their 
pictures taken will please attend be- 
tween 1 and 5:30. 



Hort. Show Students 

There will be an important meeting 
of all students interested in the Hort 
Show, Thursday, October 29, in 
French Hall at 7 P.M. It is necessary 
that all student exhibitors be present. 



Dancing Classes 

A series of lessons in ballroom 
dancing, similar to the series given 
last year is scheduled to begin on No- 
vember 6. The price for the eight les- 
sons is $2. Students may sign up with 
any member of the Senate. 



Band Rehearsal 

There will be an important rehears- 



ART OF DISTINCTION 

Continued from Page 1 

have assumed. They saunter into 

classrooms with a sneer which plainly 

says, "Shucns, we know all this old 

stuff." 

They dress in what they believe to 
be the heighth of what the college stu- 
dent will wear. They think them- 
selves in full possession of all the 
tricks in ways and means of getting 
along without studying. They look 
with disdain upon the freshmen, think 
the juniors are a bunch of grinds, and 
secretly envy the seniors their place 
in convocation. You can certainly 
tell a sophomore, but, to use a trite 
but true expression, you can't tell him 
much. 



Class of 1938 

But the juniors; ah, the juniors. 
The junior is college's outcast. He has 
lost the full knowledge of his own su- 
periority which prevades the sopho- 
more, yet he has not attained the os- 
tentatious dignity and position of a 
senior. Juniors may be recognized by 
the look of anticipation in their eyes, 
a look which spills the beans to the 
fact that they are only hanging 
around this year so they can be 
seniors next year. 

Underneath, a slight tinge of nerv- 
ousness may be noted. They are hav- 
ing their first adventure with special- 
ized study, and except for the ento- 
mology majors, are finding it anything 
but a snap. Juniors, externally, are 
jolly business men. They are in their 
anecdotage. "I remember when" opens 
all conversation, and they love to 
show how much of college ways they 
have picked up. Their greatest pleas- 
ure, however, is giving some freshman 
girl a break by going out with her. 

Class of 1937 

Seniors are college's noblemen. 
They are above the small fry and 
have honors and deferences showered 
upon them. (The freshman who just 
stated that they ought to after sur- 
viving four years at this place will be 
taken aside and talked to in a pater- 
nal manner.) A senior Is chiefly dis- 
tinguished by his studied mien and 
his refusal to talk with freshmen in 
public— except freshmen girls. Seniors 
are haughty. They resent this inva- 
sion of young upstarts. 

Like the juniors, they are worried: 



but from entirely different causes. 
They realize that their one year of 
grace will be short, and that they will 
soon be much lower in the social scale 
than college freshmen when they 
graduate; they will be neophytes in 
the school of life where the statement 
that they were once college men will 
be greeted with a laconic "so what". 
Nevertheless, they are now tops and 
they let everyone know it. Some of 
them have a swelled head and those 
are the ones that have too few credits 
to graduate. They are swelled up 
over the fact that everyone considers 
them equal to the best. All in all, a 
senior is easily recognized because of 
one outstanding thing— he is hardly 
noticeable. 



WINTER CARNIVAL 

Continued from Page 1 
and is composed of sub-committ«j 
chairmen Robert Cole '39, Robert Ma 
Curdy '38, James Payson '40, Wen dsjj 
Lapham '37, Murray George '37, 1'hL 
Lonergan '38, Bud Hooker '38, Gen»J 
Geiringer '38, Albert Gricius '37, anij 
Chick Cutter '37. 

David Rossiter '37 heads the social 

committee and will be assisted by sub-l 

committee chairmen Katherine BirniU 

|*37, Russell Hauck '38, and PhylluJ 

Nelson '38. 

The publicity committee consist* oi 
Louis Breault '37, chairman, and Lot 
ert Muller '39. 



CLASS ELECTIONS 

Continued from Page 1 
of his class after the retiring of Fran- 
cis Riel, and was a member of the 
Maroon Key and Dad's Day Commit- 
tee. This year, Babe is showing his 
form on the football field where he 
promises to become well known. He is 
a member of the Senate and of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha fraternity. 

Sophomores today voted for class 
president due to a tie between Gordon 
Najor and Herbert Glick in the vote 
for the office at the first election sev- 
eral weeks ago. 

Other sophomore officers are Con- 
stance Fortin, vice-president; Robert 
Glass, treasurer; Dorothy Nichols, 
secretary; Howie Steff, class captain; 
and Charles Rodda, sergeant-at-arms. 



AMHERST WEEK-END 

Continued from Page 1 

Kappa Epsilon: Eddie Cerrutti 
his band of Holyoke. Informal. Dec 
orations in Hallowe'en motif. Chape 
ones, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Fessen 
den, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Warfel. 

Kappa Sigma: Ed Petrucelli and 
music of Westfield. Informal. 
Decorations in Autumn motif. Cha 
erones, Professor and Mrs. Guy V 
Glatfelter and friends. 

Lambda Chi Alpha: Ned Barry's;; 
orchestra of Holyoke. Informal. Dee-J 
orations in Champagne motif. 

Phi Lambda Tau: The Springfielc| 
Syncopators. Informal. Decoration 
in Hallowe'en motif. Chaperone 
Mr. and Mrs. Helming and friends. 

Phi Sigma Kappa: The Anthers 
Serenaders. Formal. Decorations ill 
football motif. Chaperones, Profejl 
sor and Mrs. Lyle Blundell, Dr. anil 
Mrs. Claude C. Neet. 



J^tf lUuvuzt 



V' 



cm 



kfoe and f ZeafcH 




. . . This is the first 
cigarette I ever smoked 
that really satisfies me 

Not strong, not harsh and it has all the 
flavor and aroma you could ask for. 

That settles it . . . from 
now* on, it's Chesterfield, 






A I u mm 

Program 

»BZ at 8 

Tonight 




14. A. C. Library. 



Mpn 




,ol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACTIl SETTS, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER ."., 193(1 



No. 7 



ilitary Ball Takes 
Place December 4th 



AMHERST GAME 

WEEKEND 

IN PICTURES 



Hort Show Opening Is 
Scheduled for Friday 



)ance to Feature Felix Fer- 
dinando and His Original 
Park Central Hotel Or- 
chestra 

The formal dance season at the 

[•allege will get under way with a bang 

Lrly next month with a Military Ball 

destined to eclipse anything the army 

-as as yet put on at the college. 

The date is the evening of Dec. 4. 

elix Ferdinando and his Original 

/ark Central Hotel Orchestra will 

provide the music. The hours will be 

from 9 to 2. 

Students who have attended pre- 

liotis military affairs will notice that 

better orchestra than has appeared 

In at least the past three years has 

ln'i-n secured. It should also be noticed 

[hat there is a lengthening of the 

Jiours. Previous balls have usually 

jak.-n place on Saturday evening, thus 

lalting the dancing at midnight, but 

llus year the committee has secured a 

Friday evening for the affair, so those 

Attending may dance until 2 o'clock. 

First It'm Affair 

The committee feels that, since the 

Military Ball is the first big affair of 

|h<> year, a mediocre time should not 

be arranged. The services of a deco- 

lator have been secured to make the 

rwide of the Drill Hall unrecognizable. 

Program with a military motif have 

|>een especially designed by the com- 

lit tee for the affair. Friends of the 

M.S.C. unit at Norwich University 

jnd at other nearby military institu- 

|ions have been invited to attend. 

\ml an honorary colonel will be 

fleeted from those attending. 

Continued on Page 5 



itate Men Act in 
Mt. Holyoke Play 

Robert MacCurdy '38 of M.S.C. 
ill have the male leading role in the 
Bay "And Still They Prevail" which 
fill he presented at South Hadley on 
Mcembar 5, 6, 7, and 8 by the Mt. 
lolyoke College students in the ad- 
la need laboratory theater course in 
English literature and drama with the 
boperatioa of Massachusetts State 
follege. 
Other men in the cast are Robert 
filler '37 as Brinker, Albert Farns- 
<>rth 38 as Shad, and Albert Sullivan 
• Addison. The play is set in 

f»'w York City after the Civil War 
Bd has for a background the rise of 
Bosh" Tweed and Tammany. 

I He p| a y was written by Lynette 
[olroan, graduate student at Mt. 
I S, and is under the direction 

Misa Holman. 



O 19)6, Licgitt & Mybm Tobacco Co. 



IAJAR TO PRESIDE 
OVER SOPHOMORES 

■ordon Najar was elected president 
"ophomort class after a second 
held because of a tie between 
•m\ Najar in the first. K\en in 
•tid vote the results were very 
nd the winner had only a small 

I has been very active on the 

■ in his two years, leading the 

M college functions, singing in 

1 luh. and being a member of 

moom Key and Phi Sigma 

r iternitv. 





K.ri 












-^ 1 








w - „ 



All photos by LaneCibbofiM '38 
Outstanding events of the Amherst game weekend as the camera saw them. Upper right: Friday afternoon, the 
soccer game; Tommy Lyman '39 dribbles up the field in the first quarter as M.S.C. scores its only victory of the 

weekend over Amherst, 2-0. Lower I 



ALUMNI RADIO 
PROGRAM ON 
WBZ TONIGHT 



Tonight at 8 p.m. the Associate 
Alumni of Massachusetts State Col- 
lege will present a world-wide broad- 
cast over radio stations WMZ, WRZA, 
and short-wave station WIXK in' 
Boston and Springfield in connection 
with the annual Alumni Night meet- 
ings held throughout the United 
States and in Porto Rico. 

The program will consist of selec- 
tions by the college band, and a 
sextet of members from the college 
Glee Club; speeches by Ralph Taber, 
president of the Associate Alumni of 
M.S.C. and President Hugh P. Baker, 
president of Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. 

Program 

The complete program will be as 
follows: 

8:00 p.m. Band. Alma Mater. 
8:01 p.m. Band. W M B 
8:04 p.m. Talk. Ralph F. Taber T6, 
Continued on Page 6 



right; Satnrda •■ afternoon, the foot- 
ball game; leading in the second 
quarter, 7-6, M.S.C recovers an 
Amherst fumble on its own goal-line, 
and Towle punts out of danger. Am- 
herst scored again in the next quarter 
to win, 13-7. Left: the fraternity 
house parties; James F. Cutter '37 
and Miss Muriel Cain '37 were among 
those attending Kappa Sigma's. 



ERNST WOLFF, 
GERMAN, TO 
APPEAR HERE 



MEDICAL APTITUDE 
TEST DECEMBER 4 

The Medical Aptitude Tests for 
prospective medical students will be 
given at Massachusetts State College 
on Dec-. 4, 1936, according to recent 
announcement from the Association 
of American Medical Colleges. 

Those pre-med students who desire 
to take the exams must sign up with 
Doctor Harry N. Glick of the depart- 
ment of psychology before Nov. 20 to 
be eligible to take the tests. The fee 
of one dollar will be collected before 
the administering of the test and will 
be used to defray the expenses of the 
committee in charge and the actual 
giving of the exams. 

Continued on Page 2 



The Music Committee announces 
that on Nov. 16 and 17 the College 
will be visited by Frnst Wolff, famous 
German singer, This is the first time 
that departmental activity has brought 
such a famous musician to the campus. 

Mr. Wolff's services have been ob- 
tained through the Carnegie Founda- 
tion, and his visit will be planned 
along the same lines as that of Harold 
Bauer, who was here recently under 
the auspices of the Social Union. 

On Monday evening, November 16, 
Mr. Wolff will present a concert of 
German Lieder in Bowker Auditorium, 
and on the Tuesday afternoon follow- 
ing will be presented by the Fine 
Arts Council in an informal discus- 
sion of the relationship between poetry 
and music, based upon his program of 
the night before, and illustrated by 
his own singing and playing. 

Both of these concerts are free to 
Continue/ on Page 4 



Expect Record Attendance 
at Twenty-eighth Annual 
Show; To open Friday 
Afternoon at 3:00 p.m. 

A crowd of over sixteen thousand is 
expected to attend the twenty-eighth 
annual Horticulture Show which will 
open to the public on Friday at 3 p.m. 
in the physical education building. 
The show will continue until 8 p.m. 
Sunday. Admission is free. 

Formality will be the theme of the 
coming show. Displays are being ar- 
ranged by students of olericulture, 
floriculture, pomology, landscape ar- 
chitecture, horticultural manufactures, 
forestry and wild life, and horticulture'- 
but the various displays will be so 
arranged that the observer will see 
the show as a unit, not as an aggre- 
gation of several distinct and unrelated 
exhibitions. 

Keiiture l*nrt«'rr«* Garden 

In accord with this design, the 
feature of the show, a low parterre 
garden designed by James Robertson 
of the department of landscape archi- 
tecture, will be located in the center 
of the cage. The garden will consist 
of a garden pool surrounded by low- 
cut hedges, and a surmounting statue 
of "Winged Victory," a copy of the 
original by Giovanni da Bologna. 
Water lilies and chrysanthemums will 
be arranged in a naturalist i< mode. A 
high hedge will enclose the parterre 
garden, and will be surrounded on the 
outside by display tables, each con- 
forming to the formal design. Stud- 
ents of the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture, directed by Ed Holmes, 
S.S.A. '.'17, are in charge of the con- 
st ruct ion work. An artistic sent* 
Continued on Page 4 



Japanese Schoolboy Continues Education - Goes 

to Amherst Weekend, Learns 'What are done 9 



Are hear much about big event call 
Amherst Weak-end. Everybody say 
big thing, say in Collision "Athletic 
contest, tee dance, and frat hcuse 
parties feature gala weakend." Japan 
ese Schoolboy very curious, want to 
go. so ask frat brother what are to be 
necessary. Frat brother point out 
t lint first requisite to gala time are to 
get blonde Here are problem. 

"How do person acquire blonde of 
mention," ask. 

' l.eeve to me," say fiat brother. 
"Get you date what can't see." 
He Remember* 

Then ensue great confusion of tele- 



phone. Abbey. (Ireenfield, Springfield, 
North BfOOkfield, etc. but no blonde 
believe itoty about "Fellow down for 
weakend who are very lonesome." 
Finally Japanese Schoolboy remember 
semi-blonde friend name of Funny 
Face. Suffice to say get date. 

Then are things make to happen 
Go to football game on Saturday 
which are cause much yell and swear 
when ball are drop But men on field 
must like to drop ball because it are 
cause a lot of fun to scramble for it. 
Most annoying are questions by Funny- 
Face. One time she are ask, "Why do 
stop men when he are almost at goal?" 



Japanese Schoolboy become mad then, 
that are what he just about to ask. 

Soon game over, go home, eat, 
change, and get ready for evening. 
Frat brother say evening are big time 
of weakend. So all excited 

S|»id«TM, Spiders KM'rywhcrr 

At daJICe, find that people go to 
other frat house, so Japanese School- 
boy go too. In one house are all 
spider and breaked windows. Look 
like somebody use deserted boUM for 
dance. Japanese Schoolboy g€'t mad 
when shake hands with scarecrow 
what sting. Very funny. Go out 
< 'ontinutd on Page 6 



Breault, Ross, at 

Press Conference 

Louis A. Breault and Kenwood 
Ross, editor and business manager of 
the Collegian, were in attendance last 
week at the annual conference of the 
Associated Collegiate Press in Louis 
ville, Kentucky. 

The conference consisted of meet- 
ings led by prominent journalists and 
collegiate editors at which collegiate 
press problems were discussed. Fea- 
tured during these meetings were talks 
by John B. Kennedy, N.B.C. com 
mentator and former associate editor 
of Collien and Herbert F. Agar. 
Pulitzer Prize winning associate editor 
of the Louisville Courier--tournnl. 

Attending the conference were near 
ly four hundred collegiate journalists 
from 33 states 

STODDARD WILL 
SPEAK THURSDAY 

Doctor Alexander J. Stoddard, 
superintendent < »t the public si lx><>ls 

of Providence, K. I., will be the 
speaker at convocation next Thurs- 
day morning. Dr. Stoddard is a 
nat ionally-known educator and was 
last year the president of the depart- 
ment, of superintendents of the Na- 
tional P.diicat ion, Associat ion 

Dr. Stoddard will speak on a topic 
pertinent to the celebration of Na- 
tional Education Week which is being 
observed the week of Nov. 8-14. 



lb 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1936 






/llbaesacbuse 




Collegian 




OfTkinl Mvapftp** o( ""' ** 



( otlete. Published evt 



Thursday by tlie »t iidi-nt* 



LOUIS \ HKK.MI.T '.'IT, Editor-in-chief 
FREDFRICK LIKDSTROM «38, Manubu Bdtfcw WALTER GURAUMCX 

EDITORIAL BOARD 



;',7. Associate Editor 



CumpiiH 
PI1I1.1F' B. m nil I '37. Editor 
RICHARD C DESMOND 'W 
JAMES C. WAl.DMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 
MAURICE TONKIN 
MARY T. MEEHAN » 
EMERY MOORE "39 
ELEANOR WARD 39 
THOMAS J. ENRIGHT 'SB 



Athletics 
II! i \N II. KATZBFF '38. B&V* 
MAXWELL 1 Ki.AVMAN '38 
ALFRED M. SWIREN "88 
Make-up Kdltor 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN "37 

Stockbrldjle Correspondents 
RALPH HARRIS S':37 
.,i urge TROWBRIDGE ffW 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE B. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS BOARD 
KENWOOD Ross :t7. tu d nm Mw u rt 
n .1 FORD F SYMANCYK '37. A4vwtWM M«r. HARRY F. KOCH 

U1 " WILLIAM B. FERGUSON "SB. Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

. „ ^uv.ivm "18 WILLIAM II. HARRISON 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM . 

MITCHELL P. NEJAME 



37, Circulation M«r. 



•;t,s 



•38 



DONALD L. SILVERMAN "38 



"sUBSCRIPTK)NS $2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 1(1 CENTS 



Pretty swell to sit around the office 
with one's feet lodged comfortably in 
a typewriter while Collegian com- 
petitors bring in t id-bits for Reinaerd 
inch by inch. Sample some. 

ONTOMiKNY KKCAP1TI LATKS 
PHYLOGKNCY 

The stuti»tu-K department 1ms 
just isMied a new graph «■ *• 
changing reactions of fr«-*hinen. 
A graphic summary of it runs as 
follows: 

SEPT. "Say, we'll bo Into for 
that botany lecture. Lei's run." 

NOV. "Walk a little faster, 
can't you? He won't be mad if 
we're only five minutes late." 

DEC. "Aw, if we came in now, 
he'd probably count us absent, 
anyway. What's the use?" 

JAN. "Botany lecture? What 

botany lecture?" 

— Contributed 



i ii.i-,t Gaud *t New 
W.S.G.A.. Memorial 



Make all onlen DM*** •" rh < Ua ""' h "' , " s 

ColU.vn,. ID CMC ..! ctaMe of ad.lr.-s*. suhs. nl«-r 

will pkast notify the buriaaM maaMH • « ■■ 

DOaible Alumni. umlcrKraduate an.l faculty con- 
ation, a,, rfacereb —** *»* -—" 
,,,„„>- of notice. mu« be received ... the CooVffan 
office before " o^clock. Monday evening. 



Entered a, second-dare matt« at the Amherel Port 
Office. A I mailing at .peck lrat.-..,,.-,^- 

,. ri ,vid.-d f... in Section 1MB. Ad •■> Octobtt 1817. 

authon/.d AtlgUtt 3 ". lt" s - 

Printed bv The KiiiRsl.wy PraM, 83 North Street, 
Northampton. Man* Telaphow ....4. 



IQ36 Member 1^37 

ftssocicded GoUe6iate Press 

Distributors of 

Colle6iateDi6est 

MtPRCICNTCD *OH NATIONAL ADVERTISING »Y 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representativf 
420 Madison Ave. new York. N.Y. 

C-MC GO - BOSTON - BAN FRANCISCO 

LOS ANGELES • PORTLAND - SEATTLE 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday. Nov. 5 

7:(X) p.m. International Relations Club 
Tidlp.m. Band reh.arsal. Memorial Hall 
ggOO p.m. Women's Glee Club. Stockbridge 

Room 114 
Friday. Nov. 6 

:5:00 p.m. Horticultural Show, Pin sn al Kd- 

cation Building 
Lambda Delta Mil 

Si00p.m. DaacJai ■ la- Drill Hall 
Saturday. Nov. 7 

Horticultural Show 
2.00 p.m. Football 

London 
2-4 p.m. Co-ed party 

Hall 
S.00 p.m. Vk P«lty, Thatcher Hall 
Sunday, Nov. 8 
Horticultural Show 

:, (HI p.m. Vespers. Memorial Hall, lecturer 
from First Church of Christ, Scien- 
ti.-t. Boston 
Tuesday, Nov. 10 

S.00 p.m. Mens Glee Club. Memorial Bldg. 
Wednesday, Nov. II 
Holiday 

7.30 p.m. Radio Club, Physics Building 
7.30 p.m. Talk by Dr. Gilkey 
8.00 p.m. Orchestra rehearsal 
Thursday, Nov. 12 

11.00 a.m. Convocation, American Educa- 
tion Week program 
T.tiO p.m. Psych. Club. Stockbridge 
7.30 p m. Band rehearsal, Memorial Bldg. 
8,00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, Stockbridge 



! 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN doe- 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opinion, 
voiced in this column. Communications nee ! 
not be signed, but the identity of the writer 
mUBl be known to the editor-in-chief. 



SIGN IN NORTH COLLEGE 

Notice to Residents of North Col- 
lege: The barbarian who finds it 
necessary to tamper with the electric 
light system in the dormitory had 
better move back to the forest or 
accept this modern convenience. 

— Contributed 



rmnouncciiKim 



_J, 



ECONOMICS A LA MODE 
One of the Ec profs declares that 
the answer to that age-old problem of 
eating your cake and having it, too, 

is to eat it in bed. 

Contributed 

KACK.ING TIIK NEWS 
Well, our editor iind business 
manager have returned to the 
fold again after at tendinis a ton- 
ference of the Associated Collegi- 
ate ft pan in Louisville, Kentucky. 
It has been our observation that 
wherever the eolleiiiate press may 
he, it eertainly is not in the eol- 
leiiiate trousers. «. 



Combined Musical Clubs 

On Friday, Nov. 13, the Combined 
Musical Clubs will present an hour of 
music to be followed by a vie party. 
It will take place in the Memorial 
Building at 7:30 p.m. 



CDITCKIAL 

Tll VthoTigh I< tr!er^ has been no official announcement as yet 
thpre 4n be no doubt on campus that the annual sorority cat 
fi/ht his beeun and is fast approaching a climax. And, from 
what we can see now, the fiasco will be almost as good as last 

^^The sororities have a wonderful system of rushing Every- 
thing e Ls nothing is barred except the indelicacy of physical 
thing goes no nm g ^ haunt j h Abbey . 

?S^ 'let i ^ touch with fraternity friends going out with freshmen 
Id coax hem to put in a good word for the sorority. They gush 
It thetohman co-eds. For the past two or three weeks the 
grapevine ^haT Indicated that sorority meetings have been full of 

the iff SU^fc sororities are much more conscie^ 

has been no .^f^"*^™}^ c B olle g e . Last vear the sororities what can you expect after seeing them 
TJhT,ZTlZ°^^rn\\ loud eXgh , to electrify the grape- " 

vine with enough "dirt" to hurt more than the feeling, of at 

^Tfs ^T^thTSSVince of any single sorority on campus to 
make mounta ns out of molehills where the reputation of another 
make mountains, Freshman CO -eds hearing any backbiting 

EmSents directed ^"against any sorority group should look down 
o^he group making g the comments. The easiest way to cover 
up a fault Tto^make another's fault more glaring and, in many 
«Lm this is exactly what sororities have been doing 

The squeals of glee which will be heard when sororities 
finish Pledging is not for the group of girls attracted within the 
Si P but rather for the lack of pledged material gained by 
oth£ 'houses The squealing, accompanied by raised feminine 
noses should not be tolerated and should be looked on with dis- 
favor bv anv remaining pledgable material. 

This editorial is not designed to prevent freshman co-eds from 
nledJint > soronties. By the time rusfcng becomes official co-eds 
will have Xd Plentv of time to make proper estimates of the 
^rioussororitv groups. There is no advantage to be gained by 
deferred so?or iv pledging. In fact, it sometimes is the case that 
a co-ed is sociallv inhibited if she decides to wait until her sopho- 

m0 Vo r ri:rc e o a ecSs l e o dg will pledge sororities within the next 
few weeks to begin taking stock of material being whispered by 

he grapevie. % e ask them to pay more attention to the girls 

n the sororities rather than to the remarks made about them. 
fcmellber, iVa easier for a person to talk about someone else than 
to make a good example of himself. 



Psych. Club Meeting 

The first meeting of the Psychology 
Club will take place next Thursday 
evening, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. in Room 
102, Stockbridge. General organiza- 
tion and plans for the year's activities 
will be discussed. 



Vespers 

Hon. Augustus C. Norwood, lectu- 
rer, First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Boston, will speak at Vespers on 
Sunday, Nov. 8, at 5 p.m. in Memorial 
Hall. 



SOCIAL UNION PKOCiHAMS 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

On Tuesday, October 27, there was 
presented in Bowker Auditorium the 
second in the 1936-37 series of Social 
Unions. The German Student Group, I 
a group of music students at the 
Academy of Music at Berlin, fur- 
nished the entertainment, such as % 

was. 

But as far as I could see, it was no 
entertainment at all. The music, in 
itself, was played on unusual and 
interesting instruments but proved | 
very boring and monotonous after the] 
first few numbers on the program. 
From the standpoint of a student of 
music technique and the history of | 
music, it was a very good program. 
But from the ordinary student's point 
of view, the program was "lousy." 

The majority of students on this I 
campus have a meager knowledge, if 
any at all, of the history of music, and 
for the most part attend Social Unions 
merely for the aesthetic pleasure they] 
derive therefrom and not for the| 
intellectual pleasure. 

By comparison with Harold Bauer's 
presentation a week before, the last 
program rates much lower; by com- 
parison with any Social Union that 
has been presented at this college the 
past few years, the German Students] 
still suffer. 

The students at M.S.C. are inter- 1 
ested in programs that will give themj 
pleasure, not in those that bore them. 
The German Students may have been I 
of value at a Fine Arts concert where | 
a particular desire for technical know 
ledge may be had; but at a Social! 
Union they were not appreciated. 

— M.S.C. 



IxM»ks Like a £*■* Winter 

Mass. State co-eds seem to be very 
eager to don their esquestrienne garbs 



Wnul CWI JW— r-»K*<-* -!■-■ o 

go to the dogs every winter in ski suits'? 

It Was Pipetting Hot 

From the chem labs comes the 
story of the student who was seeking 
one of his profs. He approached a 
lab assistant. 

"Where's Professor So-and-so?" he 

demanded. 

"Oh," replied the assistant, "he's 
under a pipette taking a shower." 

— Contributed 



History -Sociology Club 

Students interested in the formation 
of an International Relations Club 
are invited to attend the meeting 
tonight, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m. in Room 
102, Stockbridge Hall. The program 
will include discussion and organiza- 
tion. 



Fine Arts Council 

The weekly meeting of the Fine 
Arts Council will be held as usual in 
the auditorium of the Memorial build- 
ing at 4:30 on Tuesday, Nov. 10. 



Ther It-ms to be smne doubt among the faculty as regards 
the editor's ennu-stness in writing an editorial which appeared in 
Ihe (ollruan of WO weekl ago. The editorial in question was one 
asking the facullv to volunteer to take over the paper for an issue 
tn <jhnw the students what they can do. 

It seems hat several faculty members are of the opinion 
that he ed torial was inserted for the purpose of determining 
how many faculty members read the editorial columns. This 

WBS ThVousiS of asking the faculty to put out an edition is 
nrimaHW to get them acquainted with the paper and also to give 
them a : bit of journalistic recreation. Just whatever else may be 

RailU r U™ iv nieSrs have already volunteered their aid 
This number is far from adequate. There are more competent 
faculty TournalistH than have as yet shown themselves. We 
bel eve the facultv would have a good time within the next few 
week« if tnev would come over to the office and work among 
themselves to show us what they can do. 

RcmZber. faculty, this ,s a challenge. no more volunteers 

arc sccurrd mthin the next fee ,W. YOU tail be asked personally 

u, participate in this venture. 



MODBBN <i!RLS 

modern girls don't care for sin 

what they want is synthetic gin. 

as for love, if they have the dough 

they merely hire a gigolo. 

and as for the food that women eat 

you'd think they were hollow clear to 

their feet, 
they seem to get a tremendous thrill 
out of ordering food when I pay the bill, 
their talk has turned to higher planes, 
hut still they have the same old brain 
that hahes had in grandma's day. 
good Lord, why did they get this way? 
their line is solely intellectual 
far remote from matters sexual, 
they think they all must be refined 
and cultivate a highhrow line, 
hut cheer up, hoys, and be optimistic. 
they're still one or two who can bake a 

biscuit 
the moon works in the same old way 
and they'll all get married some sweet 

day. 

—Auburn Plainsman 



Band Trip 

All men making the trip to Spring- 
field must be at the Memorial Building 
by 4:30 or sooner this afternoon. The 
bus is leaving at 4:45. Be sure to 
wear the prescribed shoes, socks, 
shirt and tie. 



The next game will be played 
Saturday against the National Farm 
School at Doyleston, Pa. Twenty 
members of the squad will make the| 

trip. 

The second team played and de- 
feated the Enfield, Conn. High School I 
by the score of 27 to 0. The third 
team was defeated by Arms Academy| 
12 to at Shelburne Falls. 

Harriers Win 

The cross-country team met andl 
defeated the Amherst Freshmen andl 
Javees on their own course. Thel 
score was 23-25-55. Bearce, Bartlettl 
and Hammond finished in that order| 
for Stockbridge. 

The next meet is scheduled fori 
Wednesday with Loomis Institute atj 
M.S.C. 



Stockbridqe 




s PORTS 




Briggsmen Beat Amherst 
To Make Only State Win 



Vietory 

The Stockbridge football team added 
a second victory to their string by 
taking a close game from Williston 
Academy. Stockbridge scored in the 
first period on a run by Fournier; he 
also scored the extra point with a run. 
Williston scored in the third period 
after intercepting a pass. 



MEDICAL TKSTS 

Continued from Page 1 
The test requires 



approximately 



one hour and forty-five minutes for 
(iving and will begin at three o'clock 
„n the afternoon of December 4th. 
According to the records of last year, 
twenty -eight students at M.S.C. took 

the lest. 

Attention is again called to the fact 
that registration must be made before 
the middle of November to assure 
one s entnnei tO the examination. 



POEM OF THE MONTH 



NOVKMKKK VALLKY 



Pale mud 

In frozen clods, 

Bttrtwd wire boundaries, 

"And no bird sings" 

Yet in my icy heart 

I feel 

A tug of wings. 

A joy unreal 

Splinters me with fear 

Then sunset lades on Warner 



Touching last 

With shadow-mist 

The dull green blur of pine-tree^ 

At the base. 

And my groping, lonely heart 

Is strangely light 

As >ou walk there 

Beside me. 

Whistling 

In the night . 

Shirley A. Hliss '38 
Judge Charles F. Frakei 



Capitalizing on two of their oppor- 
tunities, the State booters defeated a 
B trong Amherst aggregation 2-0 on 
Alumni Field last Friday afternoon to 
w jn the town championship. Al- 
ii, ugh they were forced to play with- 
out the services of Captain Joe 
Kennedy, who was suffering from 
injuries, the Statesmen overwhelmed 
ili.ir town rivals. 

The game was much more one-sided 
than the score indicates, State always 
being in control of the ball and keeping 
u , n Amherst territory. The game 
was played on a very cold day. In 
the first period the State team was 
torced to play against a very strong 
wind. Despite this handicap, there 
was no serious Amherst threat through 
out the entire period. 

In the second stanza with the wind 
at their back, the Statesmen started 
to apply pressure. After numerous 
unsuccessful sallies, Osley's difficult 
shot was partially stopped by Turner, 
the Sabrina goalie. However, Rodda, 
an alert center-forward kicked the 
rebound past the prostrate Amherst 
defender, for the first score of the 
game. 

During the entire second half, 
State continued to hold the ball in 
their rival's territory. In spite of 
numerous opportunities to score, the 
Briggsmen were unable to connect 
with the goal. But late in the last 
period, after a corner kick by State, 
Osley got loose and a beautiful corner 
kick found the cage. This continued 
the scoring for the day. 

The game was featured by the out- 
standing play on the part of the 
entire State team. For Amherst, 
Captain West and Jones played well 
for a losing cause. 

The summary: 
Msss. State Amherst 

Turner, g 8, Simpson 

I'&dolak. rb >*>■ J om;s 

i onway. Auerbath. lb lb, BctofeM 

I Adams, Parker. Feinberg. rh rh, Waldbridge. Hyat 



Alumni Return 

The Short Course office reports thai 
about twenty of the Alumni called all 
the office during the Amherst weekend] 
Charles Keefe S'36 has taken a posil 
tion as manager of the pedigree breed 
ing program at the Sunnybank Poultnl 
Farm in Littleton, Mass. Waltefl 
Mayo S'36 is now the owner-man;ig«l 
of a large poultry farm at VVesfl 
Orleans, Mass. At present he M 
fifty thousand ducks, fifty thousmi 
young birds, and seven thousand lay] 
ing hens. Hollo Higgins S'35 is n»*| 
doing Dairy Herd Improvement V j 
Cistion cow testing in Taunto 
(dunty, Conn. 

Continued on I 



Couper, ch 

buzzee, Avery, Barton, Hi 

Cain, or 

Lyman, Roberts, ir 

Rodda, Cole, c 

Silverman, Osley. II 

il. Higgenbotham. Young. Waldbridge 
Kyle, Golub. ol o\. Relder, Olds 



ch, Ray 

Ih, West 

or. Salley, Smith 

ir, Guest, Lawton 

Ca Jeppson 



HARRIERS LOSE 
HOME CONTEST 

In losing to Amherst, 25-30 last 
Saturday, the State cross-country 
team lost the first home meet in 
fifteen attempts over a period of six 
years. 

Even in defeat, however, the State 
leaders made better time than in any 
previous meet of the season. The 
individual star of the meet was 
Lawrence Pickard, the State sopho- 
more, who has shown steady improve- 
ment in every meet of the season. In 
the five meets in which he has par- 
ticipated he has won two and been 
tied for first twice. NeJame and 
Ingram, who placed fifth and sixth 
for State, also did well. Mike Little, 
who placed for State, collapsed on the 
finish line after a gallant fight to lead 
the sprinting Minnick of Amherst 
who just nosed him out for seventh 
place. 

Next Monday the cross-country 
team will travel to Boston to take part 
in the New England Intercollegiate 
cross-country race. 

Although the same team which 
faced Amherst will run for the States- 
men, the only prospect for individual 
honors appears to be Pickard. Last 
year the State harriers placed seventh 
in a field of seven, but Captain Proctor 
took individual honors with second 
place. 

If the freshman team does well in 
its meet with the Amherst Jayvees 
this afternoon, there is a strong possi- 
bility that a freshman team will be 
entered in the freshman intercollegiate 
competition. The outstanding fresh- 
man harriers are Slater, Noyes, Wing, 
Rosen, Pike, Shepardson, and Spungin. 
The summary: 

Won by Pickard (M), 2nd Moyer 
(A), 3d, Twitchell (A), 4th Schauffler 
(A), 5th NeJame (M;, 6th Ingram 
(M), 7th Minnick (A), 8th Little (M), 
9th Cutter (A), 10th Sampson (M), 
11th D. Beaumont (M), 12th Reade 
(M), 13th Custer (A). Time: 22m 43s. 




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Statesmen Lead During First Half of Amherst 
Gridiron Contest but Bow 13-7 to Sabrinas 



Lacking the extra punch to capital- I 
ize on several scoring "breaks" in the 
last period of play, the State men fell 
before Sabrina last Saturday after 
sixty minutes of intensive play which 
netted State seven points against the 
Amherst total of thirteen. 

The game which was played before 
a crowd of over five thousand cheering 
partisans found the Maroon and White 
putting on what was perhaps their 
best performance of the season. 
Ainhi-rst Strung 

The highly favored Amherst team 
faced the Statesmen with a strong 
line backed by a well primed backfield 



GRIDMEN MEET 
MIDDIES SAT. 



Playing the little navy team for the 
first time, the State team travels to 
New London next Saturday afternoon 
to meet the Coast Guard Academy 
on the gridiron. After an ambitious 
showing last Saturday afternoon a- 
gainst the town rivals the Caraway- 
men will attempt to break into the 
win column at the expense of the 
Coast Guard outfit. 

Last year the Coast Guard played a 
seven game schedule, losing five of 
the games, but winning the two key 
games against Norwich and Middle- 
bury. They downed Norwich 19-0, 
and Middlebury 8-6. They lost, how- 
ever, in 1935 to Wesleyan, Worcester, 
American U., Rhode Island and Conn. 
State. 

This year the Guardsmen have 
played six games. Of these they tied 
Wesleyan 0-0, W.P.I. 0-0 and Nor- 
wich 6-6, thereby showing great im- 
provement over last year. They have 
already lost two games this season, to 
Middlebury and Connecticut State 
45-12. Their only win of the season 
has been against the American Uni- 
versity of Washington, D. C. 



holding such men as Michell, Patten- 
gill, and Pagnotta. Outstanding for 
the Statesmen were Niden, Towle, 
and Hauck. Captain Dave Rossiter 
gave his usual good performance in 
the line, together with Bernstein, 
Fisher, and Lapham. 

With State opening the scoring by 
a touchdown and successful conversion 
about half way through the first 
quarter, it looked for a while as if 
the game on Alumni Field would be 
added to the list of upsets which 
seemed to be the order of the day 
last Saturday. But the Amherst 
touchdown in the second period closed 
up the State seven point margin to a 
scant one point lead which proved 
insufficient after the second purple 
score in the closing minute of the 
third quarter. This was the first 
game Amherst has won on Alumni 
Field in six years. 

Fifteen KimibleN 
The game was replete with fumbles 
for which the Amherst team accounted 
for ten against the Statesmen's five. 
In the first stanza seven fumbles 
were recorded against the teams. 

The Carawaymen took to the air 
sixteen times during the sixty minutis 
of play, but due to the fine Amherst 
passing defence only four passes 
clicked. State tackling was at its l>est 
last Saturday, but the fact that there 
was only one run of over ten yards 
might indicate that neither team ex- 
celled in blocking. 



I Al I SI Al 

Saturday. Football. M.S.C. vs. 

Coast Guard at New London. 

Soccer. M.S.C. vs. Trinity at 

Hartford. 
Mondny. Cross-Country. M.S.C. 

at N.E.I, in Boston. 
Wednesday. Football. Frosh vs. 

Sophs. 



FirNt Quarter 

Fisher opened the game for State 
with a long kick over the Amherst 
goal, and for the next few plays, except 
for a very few yards gained on rushes, 
the ball was brought hack and forth 
over the field on punts. The rest of 
the quarter until the State score was 
made was filled with fumbles by both 
teams by which the ball changed 
hands rapidly. 

The Carawaymen opened the scor- 
ing, however, about half way through 
the quarter when Towle, receiving a 
punt on the State 38-yard line, ran 
the ball back to the Amherst 49-yard 
stripe. On the next play State made 
five yards on a short pass from Towle 
to Lapham on the Amherst 44. On 
the State second down, Towle was 
stopped for no gain on an attempted 
rush through center. Taking the ball 
again on the next play, he completed 
another pass to Lapham on the 
Amherst 15 yard line. A wide run 
around right and climaxed by a 
hurdle over his last tackier brought 
Towle to the two-yard line after he 
took a lateral from Brown. All that 
was left was for Hauck to score on 
the next play with Fisher converting. 
The rest of the quarter wns uneventful 
and was played mostly in State 
territory. 

Second Quarter 
The second quarter, which was 
pluyed almost exclusively in State 
territory, found the Sabrinas threaten- 
ing once on rushes |M three times 
by air routes. The Jordanmen were 
stopped on the one foot line when a 
fumble by Snowball was recovered by 
Steff, and on two other occasions the 
Lord Jeffs came dangerously near 
scoring on long passes to the State 
goal. The first Amherst touchdown 
came early in the period as a result 
of a 32-yard pass. Snowball to Patten- 
gill, Failure of Pagnotta to convert 
made the score 7-6. 

Third Quarter 
In the next stanza the ball see-sawed 
Continued on Page 6 



TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEOIAN. THURSDAY. NOVKMBER I, 1936 



Dr. Goldberg Discusses 
Honor System Tradition 



A vivid and inspiring account of the 
tradition and the history of the Honor 
System as a method of giving ex- 
aminations was presented hy Dr. 
Maxwell H. (Holdberg, whose speech 
on the Honor System delivered at one 
of the Convocations of January, 19:54, 
is to be published in a forthcoming 
issue of the Phi Kappa Phi Quarterly, 
in his talk on the Honor System at 
convocation this morning. 

In referring to the operation of the 
Honor System since its adoption here, 
Dr. Goldberg remarked: "Of course, 
there have been times when the spirit 
of the Honor System has not been so 
strong as it might have been. Period* 
ically, there has arisen skepticism con- 
cerning it. Up to the present time, 
however, the doubters, both among 
the students and the faculty, have 
been answered by the renewed support 
of the System by the students; and 
the general student loyalty has given 
to our College a place of distinction 
among the colleges." 

Skepticism Viis«-n 

He then went on to say that right 
now the voice of skepticism has once 
again become insistent; and that it 
must be quieted, if it is to be quieted, 
by a renewed sense both of the privi- 
leges enjoyed under the Honor System 
and of the individual responsibility 
that these privileges place upon every 
student. He stressed especially the 
necessity of adhering to that part of 
the code of our Honor System which 
provides that the cheat be quickly 
and unhesitatingly reported to the 
Council. 

Yet he reminded his audience that 
reporting should be almost unneces- 
sary. For, unless the spirit of honor 
dominates practically all of the stud- 
ents, unless the cheat is a rare phe- 
nomenon, the Honor System has little 
chance of success. "The cheat," he 
concluded, "must be regarded as 
Public Enemy No. 1, and he must be 
frozen out of the college community 
by the chill of unrelenting social 
ostracism." 

Tract's History 

In order to give his audience a 
fuller understanding of the Honor 
System, Dr. Goldberg very briefly 
traced its history in American col- 
leges and then gave its history at 
Mass. State. 

"Historically speaking, the Honor 
System of conducting examinations," 
he asserted, "is but one expression, 
one specific manifestation, of ihe great 
tradition of the gentleman of honor 
which has been one of the powerful 
shaping forces in western civilization." 
Result* 

In speaking of the result of the 
faith of students and faculties of 
various colleges in the personal in- 
tegrity of students and in the re- 
sponsibility of students for the proper 



FEATURE OF 

1935 
HORT SHOW 




The central feature of the 1935 Horticulture Show atjM.S.C., the old 
farmhouse, was purchased last year by Mr. Louis N. Wiggins, proprietor of 
the Wiggins Old Tavern in Northampton, Mass. 

Originally brought from Greenwich Village in the Swift River valley, 
the house, with its unpainted boards and wooden shingles together with its 
old-fashioned setting, emphasized the rural motif of the show. 



DEBATERS ARGUE 
ELECTION ISSUES 



Whether Franklin D. Roosevelt or 
Alfred Landon should be the next 
president of the United States was the 
subject of a debate presented by the 
debating society last Sunday night in 
the Memorial Building. 

No Decision 

No attempt was made to award a 
decision, the main object being to 
sharpen and clarify the principal 
issues of the late presidential cam- 
paign. The pro and con of federal 
relief, the Social Security Act, the 
administration's agricultural and tariff 
program, and Roosevelt's financial 
policy were presented, since these 



conduct of examinations, he said: 
"And apparently this combined faith 
did indeed work miracles, for at 
several of our American colleges and 
universities this method of handling 
examinations achieved signal success." 

"At our college," continued Dr 
Goldberg, "the Honor System was 
adopted not without a good deal of 
preliminary doubt, discussion, and 
cooperative effort on the part of 
students and faculty." 

He informed his audience that local 
student concern with an Honor Sys- 
tem of conducting examinations was 
expressed as early as 1918, with 
tangible results; but that our Honor 
System, as we now know it in its 
general outlines, was not formally 
adopted until April 12, 1920. 



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Amherst, Mass. 



were considered the most significant 
issues. 

Three men took part on each side, 
speaking for ten minutes. A modified 
form of the Oxford plan of debating 
was used, the final formal rebuttal by 
the affirmative being omitted. Since 
most of the speakers incorporated a 
large amount of rebuttal material in 
their ten minute speeches, the debate 
was lively and controversial. 
Debater* 

Dr. Goldberg served as chairman. 
The Republican, or affirmative side 
included John Hoar, Francis Thomas, 
and Albert Thomas, while Richard 
Desmond, Walter Lewis, and Max 
Lilly upheld the Democratic adminis- 
tration. 



I mnt^\0 r ~~ n ^i^^mn0^tt " 







Shows dailv 2:30 6:30 8:30 



Thin--... Nov. 5 

^Herbert Marshall, Ruth Chatterton] 

in 

"GIRLS' DORMITORY" 

with that new personality 
SI MONK SIMON 

Fri.-Snt., Nov. «-7 

|Frederic March Warner Baxter[ 

Lionel Barry more in 

"THE ROAD TO GLORY" 

— second feature — 

[Patsy Kelly Charlie Chase| 

Pert Kelton in 

"KELLY THE SECOND" 

Sim. -Mon. -Tuph., Nov. 8-10 

LWilliam Powell Myrna Loy| 

Jean Harlow Spencer Tracy in* 

"LIRELED LADY" 

Wed.-Tlmrs.,' Nov. 1 1-12 

r Adolphe Menjou Alice Fayel, 

in 

"SING, RABY. SING" 



HORTICULTURE SHOW 

Continued from Page 1 
terminal feature is being designed by 
Carl Gerlach and Charles Meyers, 
graduate students in landscape archi- 
tecture. 

Norm Butterfield '37, chairman of 
the floriculture committee, promises 
impressive floral displays. These will 
include vase arrangements of large- 
flowering chrysanthemums, and bowl 
arrangements of small-flowering varie- 
ties. Competition will be open in 
three classes to all students in flori- 
culture. 

Competitive IH*pliiyK 

Exhibitions by the students of land- 
scape architecture and floriculture, 
according to Robert Thorndike '37, 
chairman of the landscape architecture 
committee, will be well in keeping 
with the formal theme of the show. 
Each display will occupy an area of 
100 square feet. Many of the past 
displays of the landscape architecture 
students have been comparable to the 
magnificent displays of larger horti- 
cultural shows. The displays of the 
landscape architecture students will 
also be competitive. 

John A. Tuttle '37, supervising the 
plans of the students of olericulture, 
guarantees an interesting display. A 
white statue of Florae of Rome will 
stand on a carpet of fine grass, and 
will be flanked on either side by color- 
ful cornucopiae overflowing with choice 
vegetables. A black background and 
an arborvitae enclosure will enhance 
this arrangement. 

The exhibits of the pomology stud- 
ents will feature displays of numerous 
varieties of select apples and other 
fruits. Lee Rice '37, student chairman 
in charge, promises an exceptional 
background design, concordant with 
the formal note of the show. 

Sponsor Commercial Displays 

Members of the Holyoke and North- 
ampton Florists' and Gardeners' Club 
will sponsor commercial displays. Com- 
petition will be in two classes: entrants 
in class A will compete for the cup 
donated by the Holyoke Transcript- 
Telegram, to be awarded for the 
twelve best blooms of chrysanthemums 
any variety; contestants in class B 
will compete for the cup offered by the 
Florists' Supply Company of Boston 
for the twelve best blooms of chry- 
santhemums, any variety. 

Clarence Benson, S.S.A. '37, is 
supervising the display to be given by 
the students of forestry and wild life. 
There will be exhibits of wild life, 
and an information service on forestry 
questions. 

The horticultural manufactures dis- 
play will include an exhibition of 
canned goods, and a demonstration of 



Amherst Poet 
Reads Verses 



Reading from his recently published 
volume of verse, "Stand With Me 
Here," Robert Francis, well known 
Amherst poet, appeared last Tuesday 
afternoon on the weekly Fine Art, 
program. 

Most of the poems which Mr. 
Francis read were rather personal in 
nature. His first selection was an 
impression of the pitch pine, after 
which he gave a group of brief por- 
traits of men and women, impression- 
istic and suggestive. 

There were two especially delightful 
pieces, full of ghosts and witchery. In 
these as in the rest, the verse wag 
enriched with telling, expressive 
phrases. "Like a lurking basilisk" 
describes the beldame of "Black 
Frost." Many effects were gained, 
too, by ingenious rhymes and rhythms. 

More conventional than the rest 
were two "Dark Sonnets" of notable 
descriptive power. With "Boy's No- 
vember" which had a youthful sim- 
plicity and freshness, Mr. Fran us 
concluded the program. 



ERNST WOLFF 

Continued from Page 1 
students and the public, but tickets 
must be obtained early. They will be 
available after Tuesday, Nov. 10, in 
the President's office, the Alumni 
office, at Wilder Hall, and at Stock- 
bridge Hall. Tickets are strictly 
limited in number, and should be 
called for as early as possible to avoid 
disappointment. 



AFTER I 111: UK. GAME 

CELEBRATE AT 

MANDCNICC'l 
I I \l VI I AM 

Dine, Wine and Dance 

The finest in quality 
Foods and Beverages 

Just below the Town Hall 



the process of their manufacture. 
Walter Simonsen '37 is directing this 
display. 

Ralph Gates '37 will conduct a 
store at which vases, flower pots, and 
books on gardening may be purchased. 
An information booth will be in 
charge of students. 

W. James Hodder '37 is general 
chairman of the show. He is assisted 
by the following sub-chairmen: John 
A. Tuttle '37, olericulture; Norman 
W. Butterfield '37, floriculture; Lee 
Rice, Jr. '37, pomology; Robert 
Thorndike '37, landscape architecture; 
Ralph Gates '37, store; Philip Layton 
'37, publicity; Walter Simonsen '37, 
horticultural manufactures; Clarence 
Benson, S.S.A. '37, forestry and wild 
life; Edwin S. Holmes, S.S.A. '37, 
horticulture. 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Complete line of 

COLLEGE SEAL JEWELRY 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

with your name printed free 

50 for 89c 25 for 8t)c 

50 for I .SO 25 for 1.45 

See our samples ORDER NOW 



V. 9. Camera 1936 

Best pictures of the year 
$2.90 



Popular Sheet Music 

All the latest hits 
30 and 35c 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



THE NATIONAL SHOT REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our high-classed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



PLAID WOOL SHIRTS 

All wool in bright plaids $3.95 to $5. 
Heavy cotton plaids at $1.50 
Don't miss seeing the new Interwoven wool sox. 
Priced 50c to $1.65 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothe* for College Men for forty-five yean 



College Candy Kitchen 



A NICE TREAT AT TIIE SARRIS 

this week-end with your friends. Lunch or Dinner or refreshments. 

Home Made Pastry. 



LS.C. STUDENTS PREFER FORDS, 
;AMPUS COP'S STATISTICS SHOW 



Watch the Fords crawl by" is a 

,,n that can well be observed by 

gC, students. 

\ peek into the registration files of 
„ n Moran, campus guardian-of-the- 
„ yields the information that stud- 
io on campus stand more of a chance 

being hit by a lowly Ford than by 
I other car; for of the 136 cars, 
.Metered on campus, 48 of them are 

ords. 

Chevrolet** Secoinl 

, v it is a fair bet that the vehicle 

,,t nicks the student, bicycles ex- 

| u ded, may be the more respectable 

h, vrolet, which number 32. But 

tudenti can scarcely expect to brag 

. omparatively aristocratic Pack- 

L| ,,r Buick, or Plymouth has shat- 

\, Tt .d their equilibrium; for these 

jjgkes number, respectively and in- 

Jgnifically, four, five, and eight. 

The files also disclose that seventeen 

Lt of-state cars are registered on 

tmpuB. One car bears the license 

"'late of far-off Michigan; five have 

ravelled here from Connecticut, one 

torn Maine, six from New York state, 

Le from New Hampshire, two from 

[ , rmont, and one from Rhode Island. 

Twenty Senior Cars 

Of the four year classes, the class 

u 1937 holds the dubitable honor of 

leistering the most cars, having 

L.-nty to its credit. The class of '39 

ranks next with 19, followed by the 

■ lass Of '38 with its 17, and the class 

Lf '40 with 16. 



Ir. Gilkey Speaks 
On Armistice Day 



Armistice Day is to be celebrated 
I M.S.C. this year by a program 

Sponsored by the Christian Federation 

In which Dr. Gilkey of Springfield is 

P<> speak. 

Dr. Gilkey is already well known as 
lecturer and commentator on Euro- 
Dean affairs, and he is to present a 

falk. "Europe, 18 Years After" in 
vhirh he will present his own obser- 
vations and impressions of Europe, 
particularly Nazi Germany and Russia 
where he spent the summers of 1933 
ud 1935. 

His talk will be illustrated by movies 
l i ken by himself in those countries, 
Hnd one film given him by the German 
government. His appeal will be for a 
better understanding of and a saner 
putlook toward a Europe alarmingly 

(lose to 1914. 

The meeting is to be held in the 
|Mi morial Building at 7:30 p.m. 



TUCKTITE BAGS 

including 
Nov Stylos and Materials 

$1.00 each 

miss Cutler' s Gift Shop 



New Well Begun 

On Mount Toby 

To provide a long needed water 
supply for the forestry headquarters 
at Mount Toby, operations for drill- 
ing a well there will begin next week. 

Heretofore the source of water 
has been a cistern and the spring, 
both inadequate. Many times the need 
for a sufficient supply of water has 
been seriously felt. 

Since the well is to be 
of the drilled type, the quality of the 
water should be excellent. It will be 
used to water the young tree nur- 
series there as well as for drinking 
purposes. 

CLASS RING PLANS 
MAKE HEADWAY AS 
BIDS ARE RECEIVED 



The wealth of tradition at Mass. 
State will soon add another chapter 
to its history as the senior class pro- 
vides an established, standard ring 
for the college. The absence of an 
official ring has long been cause for 
comment among the students but 
until now, no definite steps have ever 
been made toward its acceptance. 

The senior class has taken the 
initial steps in procuring a ring which 
each succeeding graduating class may 
use as its own token, at once symbolic 
and traditional. 

Ferrticei Heads Committer 
Anthony Ferrucci Jr., chairman; 
Lucille Monroe, Carolyn Rogers, 
Austin Fisher Jr., Edward Thacker, 
and Wendell Lapham are the senior 
members of the committee acting on 
the question. Also on the committee 
are representatives from each of the 
other classes: Eugene Gieringer '38, 
Olive .Norwood '39, and Fletcher 
Prouty '40. 

Several meetings have been held 
already to contact jewelry companies 
and to receive and look over bids 
from these concerns. Many of the 
companies have submitted sketches 
and designs. As the deadline for the 
receipt of these plans has been set for 
Nov. 16, the college students will 
soon have the opportunity of viewing 
the suggestions and deciding for 
themselves, through the committee, 
what their ring shall be. 



100, 

Returns on the current election 
reveal that M.S.C. 's record for mis- 
forecasting election results remains 
unbroken. In the local poll on 
October 16, M.S.C. chose Landon 
to win, 3 to 2. In 1932, M.S.C. 
saw Hoover the victor, 4 to 1. 

The national collegiate poll con- 
ducted by the Daily Prineetonian 
also showed how wrong the actual 
results on November 3 were. The 
students saw Landon taking 16 
states with 233 electoral votes. 
Roosevelt 14 states with 206, with 
14 states totaling 92 electoral votes 
not reporting. 

The Literary Digest poll was just 
as wrong as the Collegian poll, but 
there is one difference between 
them. The Literary Digest has been 
right before. 



ROCKWELL TO ADDRESS CAMERA 
CLUB FRIDAY; ANNOUNCE SHOWS 



Newman Club Plans 
Breakfast Sunday 



Coefc "Kewe 



Discussing "The Problem of Ex- 
posure," H. P. Rockwall. Jr. of the 
Weston Electric Instrument Company, 
Newark, N. J., will speak to the 
Amherst Camera Club at its next 
The first Newman Club eommunion I meeting, Nov. 8 at 7:80 o'Ho. k in the 
breakfast of the vear will be held in 4H rluh House. 

Father Madden Hall after the nine Mr. Roekwell socializes in this 
o'clock mass on Sunday, November 8. j »uhject and has a complete set of 
David P. Kossiter, president of the, H » d «* to br,n * out fewWjf ""' *' V,,H 
Newman Club, announced todav. All I <> f 'mproper exposure, ami some means 
Catholic students at the college are to secure P«T<ect negatives. Clubs 
invited to attend. Tickets may be \ **» neighboring cities have been in- 
obtained from any of the officers of j vitwl to participate in the meeting, 
the club. Future K«liil>i(ioiis Aiiiiomii'iil 

Officers include: president, David | The present exhibition of photo- 
Rossiter '37; vice-president, Herbert I graphs by Dr. Paul E. Truesdell in 
Brown '38; secretary, Mary P. O'- Goodell Library will be left until tin 



CO-EDS ! CO-EDS ! 

SPINSTER SPREE, NOV. 7 
Co-eds will assemble in the 
Memorial Building on Nov. 7 
for the annual get-together. 
Dancing and refreshments will 
be in order. 
Mem. Building 2-4 p.m. 



Connell; publicity chairman, Charles 
E. Eshbach '37. 



PLANS ANNOUNCED 
BY PRE-MED CLUB 
FOR NEW PROGRAM 



MEET AT 



BARSELOniS CAfE 

BALLANTINES ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 
Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



Lambda Delta Mn 

Mr. and Mrs. Helming and friends 
have been announced as chaperons 
for the vie party on Friday, Nov. 6. 

Over Amherst week-end, several 
alumnae visited at the sorority house. 
Among them were Marie Currier, 
Harriet. Roper Kimball, Rosamund 
Shattuck Schreiter '35, Dorothy Nur- 
mi, and Marjorie Whitney '36, and 
Alfreda Ordway '35. 

Beryl Briggs, Betty Jasper, Phyllis 
MacDonald, and Grace O'Donnell 
were given the second degree service 
toward membership on Monday eve- 
ning. 

Phi iMm 

Phi Zeta held a tea yesterday after- 
noon in the Abbey center. Althea 
Thompson was in charge. Miss Briggs, 
Mrs. Henshel, Mrs. Chadwick and 
Mrs. Broughton poured. 

Phi Zeta ushered at Vespers, Sunday. 

Mrs. Ruth D. Morley of the Ex- 
tension Service has become patroness 
of the sorority. 

Several of the Alumnae were back 
this past week-end. An Alumnae 
luncheon and meeting were held 
Saturday. Ann Gilbert was in charge 
of the luncheon. 

A very successful buffet supper and 
Hallowe'en party was held last Friday 
evening. The chaperons were Mr. 
and Mrs. Hawley and Mr. and Mrs. 
Gaskill. 
Alpha Lambda Mn 

Frances Filipkowski '37, Frances 
Stepath, and Cynthia Carpenter '38 
have completed the third degree and 
are now members of the sorority. 



The program of the Pre- Med Club 
for the rest of the semester was an- 
nounced at the first meeting held a 
week ago in which Dr. Hough of 
Springfield was guest speaker. 

On Nov. 5 at 9 p.m., Dr. Kisiel, a 
Springfield physician, is to give a talk 
on "The Family Doctor Today." On 
Nov. 19 a discussion conducted by 
Fr. Martin of St. Brigid's Church is 
to be held on the subject of sex 
education among high school students; 
the meeting is open only to members 
of the club. 

The December program is as yet 
tentative. However at the Dec. 3 
meeting either Dr. Myerson, Boston 
neurologist, or Dr. Elkind, Boston 
psychiatrist, will be guest speaker. 
Dr. Potter, head of the department of 
zoology of Clark University, will speak 
at the Dec. 17 meeting. His subject 
will be "Tropical Diseases and Poi- 
sons." a talk illustrated with slides. 



day after the meeting for the benefit 
of the guests. Then from November 
7 to November 16 a show from the 
Brattleboro Camera Club will be 
exhibited. It will be followed by a 
show composed of prints in the 1937 
American Photography Annual, which 
will stay until November 88, Then 
there is to be a set of American desert 
pictures from Pasadena, California, 
called the "Pack Rats." 

The November competition for 
camera club members will feature 
genres, i.e., pictures of persons em- 
phasizing occupation, and interiors. 
The December competition will in- 
clude water scenes and still life. In 
last month's CO P t ee l first prize for 
summer landscapes was won by J. H. 
Vondell with his Lover's Lane and for 
formal child portraits by Rev. T. T. 
Dixon with Nancy. 

Proponed Officer* 
The nominating commit tee has an- 
nounced its list of proposed officers for 
1936-37. It includes: president, Dr. 
W. F. Powers; vice-president, R. L. 
Coffin; secretary, J. H. Vondell; 
treasurer, A. L. Swift; executive com- 
mittee, B. P. Cummings, R. K. Day, 
C. S. Gerlach, D. S. Lacroix, and Miss 
E. Mathesius. 



Sheaffer, Parker and Waterman FOUNTAIN PENS 
Die Stamped Stationery Daily and Sunday Papers Delivered 

A.J. Hastings "ESSST HI So. Pleasant St. 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 



M. S. C, MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 



Only dry cleaning plant in town. 



AO 



rk called for and delivered 



Telephone 828 




Mans. State 
students are 
invited to our 
store for the 

latest in 

riding tog* 

and 

sportwenr. 



Phyllis Macintosh '36, Alma Merry 
'35 and Mrs. Hilton Boynton (former- 
ly Alma Colsoni '34, were entertained 
as house guests for the Amherst 
week-end. 

A successful Hallowe'en party was 
held Sunday evening. Sally Hopkins 
was in charge of decorations, Edith 
Whit more of entertainment, and 
Barbara ("lark of refreshments. 

Alpha Lambda Mu is holding open 
house Sunday evening after vespers. 

Alumni Keturn 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Allen Jr. 
'35 and '36 were on the campus over 
the week-end. 

Sigma II.- 1. -i Chi 

Among the alumnae of the sorority 
who were on campus last week-end 
were: Grace Goulart and Ellen Guion 
'35, Dorothy Corcoran, Dorothy 
Masters. Elva Britton, Helen Reardon 
and Marguerite Ford, all of the class 
of "36. 

Lois Barnes is in charge of the 
alumnae bulletin, the Sigma. The 
first issue of the bulletin will be I he 
Thanksgiving issue, to appear soon. 

Last week-end the seniors enter- 
tained the other members of the 
sorority at a Hallowe'en party. I.u 
cille Monroe was in charge. 

Sigma Iota 

Sylvia C.oldsmitb is in charge of 
Sigma lota's forthcoming tea for the 

( o ids. 



RAND SPEAKS AT 
VESPER SERVICE 

"That man is happy who comes into 
middle life with something unsullied 
in his soul," said Professor Frank 
Prentice Rand in his talk on "Some 
thing Unsullied" at the Veepen Ser- 
vice on Sunday afternoon. 

By the term unsullied, Professor 
Band explained, he was referring to 
what Plato called "goodness of the 
soul." "This 'goodness of the soul'," 
he continued, "consists of such quali- 
ties as honor, the power of admira- 
tion, love, faith and gentility." Pro- 
fessor Rand illustrated these qualities 
by numerous references to literature, 
to the Bible, to the lives of poets and 
to the lives of men who were connected 
with the college. 

After the formal part of the services 
were over, Professor Rand answered 
questions which were related to his 
talk in the lounge. 



Ml I.U A BY BALL 
Continued from Page 1 

The price of ticket! tor this affair 
has been kept down to 88.50 |xr 
COUple, Last visit's ball lurned in a 

profit and the present committee has 

figured that all available money turned 

in to the dance this year should be 

figured in the expenses. 

Tickets may be second at anv time 
from Kenwood Boss. Bob ( 'ouhi ,, 
l,erov Clark. Wendell Lapham, I.ouis 
Brcault and Robert Lyons. 



We stock breeches, rid ing hoots. 

Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



DYQBONIC MY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



■ 
I 



6 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THUMSDAY, NOVEMBBB ",, i»3« 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



HICKEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES 



AM MM It MHO I'lHM.K \\l 

Continued from Page 1 

president of the Associate Alumni. 

8:07 p.m. Skit. Roister Doisters. 

8:11 p.m. Song. Sextet singing The 
Hills of Old Wyoming as part of 
the skit. 

8:14 p.m. Skit. (Continuation.) 

8:19 p.m. Solo. James Kerr '36 sing- 
ing / Carry You in My Pocket. 

8:22 p.m. Talk. Hugh P. Haker, pres- 
ident of the college. 

8:27 p.m. Song. Sextet. 

8:28 p.m. Song. Alma Mater sung by 
the sextet, alumni present, and 
alumni all over the world who are 
listening in, accompanied by the 
band. 

8:30 p.m. Close of the program. 

This is the first lime in the history 
of the college that the alumni scattered 
throughout the world will be able to 
hear the alumni broadcast through 
the medium of short-wave. The sing- 
ing of the Alma Mater by the entire 
alumni will be an appreciated inno- 
vation. 

I'.-il.i- Pari in Play 

The Roister Doisters taking part in 
the play are John Hoar '38 and Ivan 
Cousins '39. The sextet will consist 
of James Kerr '36, Norman Grant 
'37, Donald Tucker '37, Bernard Kohn 
'38, Mederic Beloin '38, and Milton 
Auerbach '39. The skit was written 
by Francis Pray '31. 



The broadcast is being arranged by 
Elwyn Rowell '24, director of the 
New England Radio Market News 
Service and president of the Boston 
Alumni Club. Robert Hawley "18, 
secretary of the college, and Francis 
Pray '31, head of the M.S.C. news 
service, are in charge of the program. 



AMHEBST GAME 

Continued from Page 3 
back and forth across the field until, 
with only a few minutes left in the 
period, Amherst received the ball on 
the State 47 where Michel 1 made 
seven yards on a rush. A shovel pass 
netted the Amherst eleven another 
yard. The next play saw Michell 
forced offside on the State 29-yard 
line making a first down. Taking the 
ball again on the next play, Michell 
passed to Coey who scored again for 
the purple team, making the score 
13-7 after Pagnotta converted. 

Fourth Quartci 

Three incomplete and one inter- 
cepted State pass spelled State's de- 
feat in the last quarter of the game. 
The Maroon and White recovered 
three Amherst fumbles within the 22- 
yard line, but were unable to take the 
bal! forward any considerable dis- 
tance on these scoring opportunities. 

The last break for the Statesmen 
came in the closing minutes of the 



game when Towle recovered a fumble 
by Michell on the Amherst 22. A 
series of runs by Niden and Czelusniak 
netted State a first down. A pass, 
Niden to Czelusniak, brought State's 
ball to the thirteen-yard line, but on I 
the next play, Schweizer intercepted 
a pass two yards from the goal line. I 
The game ended with the ball in 
Amherst's possession on the 15-yard 
line. The score: Amherst 13, State 7. 



The summary: 
Amherst 13) 
Coey, !•• 



Mass. State i7> 

!■• Lapham 
It R*he* 
Ik. i -H' in-. 
c Roaster 
rii Bernstein 



Palmer, It 

II, nt. l« 

Kennedy, c 
Willterung, ru 

I, ami), rt 

S hweizer. re 

Cti-tmau >i' 

) Mil hell llib 
K. Pattenxlll, rlih 
Snowball, fh 

Substitutes -Atnhen 

t,n kli-: X>- vtonil). 
Kiilm; center: Goode 
V Pttttengill, Hiillirm 
\\VII>. 

M.i—. Suite End*: Motey, Putnam 
Perkins, O'Brien; guard*: Robwge, 
center: Collin*; back*, Bullock Muri 
Icowski Czelusniak, Steff. 



n'll- 



W 



guard* 
k^: RaCfl 
uuo, low 



e, Mo*etey 

i|ii. Haii' k 

11,1, Towle 

lii». Brown 

H>. Niden 

t, S-.-l.-s-; 
< ..la. i. 

Farm in. 

tackle-*: 
Linden 



JAPANESE SCHOOLBOY 

Continued from Page 1 
door, door sting. Funny Kate laff and 
laff but Japanese Schoolboy, as are 
said in America, "Slam." 

Notice funny thing. In house people 



called chaperones never show face. 
In home land, chaperones always 
eagle-eye. Ask Funny Face what are 
disconnection. She say, "Oh, in j 
America chaperones know it are no ' 
use." Wonder what are meant. 

Get big shock. Go to house, dance 
nice. All of sudden see DEAD MAN! 
Look some more. Very shocked. In 
home land people never make to i 
dance when person are die. Dead man 
rise up soon, lay back down. Suffice 
to say Japanese Schoolboy leave. 

What Are Aliiiiwmscs 

Notice lot of people call alumnuses 
Come to house. Drink from bottle. 
Bet funny. Ask of frat brother what 
BX8 alumnuses. "Oh," say frat brother, 
"Alumnuses are people what give all 
reputation for drinking to colleges in 
America." Begin to think America 
very funny place, not to mention 
Amherst Weakend. 

Firally dance are over. Frat brother ! 
say we go to Vansteaks. Get to 
Vansteaks find everybody at dance 
have transferred location. By this 
time Japanese Schoolboy get sleepy, 
suggest to frat brother go home. 
"Sure," he say, and go away. Girl 
with apron take about $2 from Japan- 
ese Schoolboy. Very funny. 

In Full Swing 

Take Funny Face home, frat brother 
ard Japanese School hoy come back to 
M.S C. a- d find things in full swing. 



People are running around Dog ( ,-■ 
with bottles, singing, and stuff. ] c | 
one house are making how are said irl 
America "Whoopee." Hear after ofl 
North Brookfield also great place! 
All very confusion. Japanese School.| 
boy go to bed. 

Japanese Schoolboy have complaint! 
to editor of Collisian. Amherst Weak.) 
end are very fine. Dance are very fine. 
Funny Face are very fine. Alumnu.seJ 
are very fine. Everything are \ r 
fine. But one thing are bother.. 
Japanese Schoolboy believe in laws ofl 
United States, so how can frat brother,' 
import without pay duty? Ans.v.- r 
very appreciated. 



STOCKBBIDGE 

Continued from Page 2 
Armistice Program 

A special Armistice Day progr im 
was held on Wednesday, Nov. 4. TM 
Rev. Kenneth C. MacArthur, chap.1 
lain of the 5th Regiment, was the! 
speaker of the day. President Bakerl 
made a short address. The student! 
body then marched to Memorial Hallj 
and placed a wreath beneath the| 
Memorial tablet. 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campusl 



P, 



URE . . . and of finer 
texture than most anything 
that touches your lips . . . 

We all agree on this . . . cigarette 
paper is important. For Chesterfield 
we use the best paper that we can 
buy. It is called Champagne Ciga- 
rette Paper. It is made from the soft, 
silky fibre of the flax plant. It is 
washed over and over in clear, spark- 
ling water. 

A lot of the pleasure you get in 
smoking Chesterfields is due to our 
using the right kind of cigarette pa- 
per. Chesterfield paper is pure, and 
it burns without taste or odor. 




' V \ 






-\. 



he s terf ield 



Remember this . . . two things make the 
smoking quality of a cigarette — the tobaccos and the 
paper. The Champagne cigarette paper on Chester- 
fields is tested over and over for purity, for the right 
burning quality. Another reason why Chesterfield wins. 



K.P.I. At 
Troy 



Saturday 




11. A. C. Library. 



Mm 



Wolff 



Singi* 
.Monday 



Vol. XLVU 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1936 



No, 8 



86 Percent of Class 
of 1936 Are Occupied 



ncrease of 19 Percent 
Over Class of 1935 Is 
Noted in Placement Ser- 
vice Questionnaire 

One hundred and twenty-seven of 
the men in the class of 1936, approxi- 
mately 86"«, have obtained employ- 
ment or are continuing their education 
in graduate schools, Professor Guy V. 
JIatfelter of the placement office 
innounces. 

Last year's report of the class of 

1935 reveals that only 67 £ of the male 

raduates were employed when their 

questionnaires were returned to the 

jlacement office. 

The complete list of graduates of 
the class of 1936 are as follows: 

Ralph Adams. Artesian Well Company, Sey- 
(iioiir, Conn.; Elmer Allen, Graduate School, 
\,-Ht,mtship. Floriculture. M S.C.; George II. 
Utefl, Service Scholarship, Business Administra- 
[ioii. Harvard; Roger Allen, Medical School, 
rtrfU; Is.iac Arenberg. Milk Salesman. Rochester, 
U Ralph A. Arnold. Training in wholesale 

fir ijk t'U.-im-ss. Brewer & Co., Worcester, Mass. 

i ii- tcr Bahcock, Graduate School, Chemistry. 
LIS i. .; Daniel Balavieh. Lyman School for Boys, 
pVeitboro, Mass.; Randolph Barrows, 2nd Lieut., 

Troop. ,'Jrd Cavalry. U. S. Army, Fort Ethan 
kill n Vt.; Jackson A. Barton, Graduate School, 
^■ycholOEy, Boston University; Carleton E. 

one, I'liMicity, in charge of Highway Safety 
astratkn which is being shown around the 
Isantry, Aetna Casualty & Surety Co.. Hartford, 
fonn.; Morris Bernstein. Law School, Harvard. 

Arthur F. Bixby, Salesman, General Chemical 
I'ltf-liurgh, Pa.; W. Roderic Bliss, RwMo 
I United American Bosch Co.. Springfield, 

y\.,-~ Knl>ert S. Bray, Law School, Boston 

invrMty; Owen J. Brennan. working in cliffer- 

■ -;>.'irtments of the San-Nap-Pak Co.; Arnold 

Iriere, Medical School, Tufts; Alfred Bruei kivr. 

• . i : 1 1 trip, Bacteriology, Purdue University, 

tifavrtte. Ind. 

Frederick Bull. Massachusetts Mutual Insur- 
Continued on Page 2 



iERIES OF GERMAN 
FILMS ANNOUNCED 



RAIN MARS 
HORT SHOW 
ATTENDANCE 



A ~»ries of five German sound films 

be. presented each Monday after- 

|0OD at 4:35 at the Amherst theater 

eginning Nov. 16 and continuing 

inmjjh Dec. 14 has been announced 

\y Prof. Julian. The films have all 

ktn produced in Germany with 

ferm.in actors but have English 

ItlogUfl titles. Tickets for the series 

re priced at 50 cents and may be 

'i mild from the German office in 

| i inn Laboratory. 

Dei Alte und der Junge Koenig" 

I" be the first film, with Emil 

innings playing the part of Frederich 

» l| !ilm. father of Frederich the 

Mr. Jannings may be remem- 

Nted Nir his acting in the American 

refaction of "Flesh and the Devil" 

bic \. ,rs back. Other films to be 

pented are as follows: Nov. 23, 

>•;«■ W.lzerkrieg"; Nov. 30, "Lieb- 

1 >e)C. 7, "Abel mit der Mund- 

il .-i "; and Dec. 14, "Geschieh- 

}' -i • m Wienerwald." 



freshmen Receive 
Progress Reports 



Fresl 
page 

Aecoi 

Ki- 
ds 
nur 
nc t 



n as well as leopards never 
beir spots, judging by the 
•ports issued last week. 
»K to Dean Lanphear there 
M many freshmen flunking 
D any courses as ever. And 
,f, r of those immortals who 
"ugh unscathed shows no 



13,052 People Attend 
During Three Days 

The cage of the physical education 
building was the mecca of 13,052 
people attending the twenty-eighth 
annual Horticulture Show, held last 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The 
total fell short of last year's attend- 
ance of 14,468, but the inclement 
weather of Sunday, the final day of 
the exhibition, was blamed for the 
difference. 

Attendance Peak 

During the first day of the show, 
1876 visited the various displays. The 
attendance peak of the three days run 
was reached on Saturday, when a 
crowd of 3272 attended. 7904 visitors 
witnessed the last day of the show. 

First place winners in the student 
competitions are as follows: 

Floriculture; vase arrangements of 
large flowered chrysanthemums: Al- 
bert J. Gricius '37. 

Students in greenhouse manage- 
ment; bowl arrangements of small 
flowered chrysanthemums: Walter K. 
Mitchell *38. 

Stock bridge students; basket ar- 
rangements of small flowered chry- 
santhemums: Peter Minkus, S'37. 

Formal displays of 100 square feet: 
Bernard Higdon S'37. 

Informal displays of 100 square 
feet: Albert Forbush '38. 

Arrangements of chrysanthemums 
and the use of other accessories: Jack 
Kelleher S'38. 

Basket arrangements of small flow- 
ered types of chrysanthemums: Ed- 
ward Norberg S'37. 

Same, but vase arrangements: Peter 
Minkus S'37. 

Basket arrangement of native or 
other hardy materials: W. Dewhirst 
Wade S'37. 

Vase arrangement of same: Fred 
Davis. 

Winter bouquet: Walter F. Golash. 
Continued on Page 6 



FORMAL GARDEN 

AT 

HORT SHOW 



Present Concert by 
Ernst Wolff, Monday 




Increase List 
Of Schools in 
College Plan 



An expansion in the co-operative 
agreement which has been in effect for 
several years was announced this week 
by Dean William L. Machmer. In 
addition to the old agreement with 
schools of medicine and forestry, the 
agreement now includes an arrange- 
ment with outstanding schools of law, 
and engineering, whereby M.S.C. stu- 
dents may enter on professional study 
at the end of their junior year. 

Definite arrangements have so far 
been made with the Cornell, Tufts, 
and Dartmouth medical schools, the 
Yale forestry and law schools, and 
the Dartmouth department of civil 
engineering. 

Students who have made an excep- 
tional scholarship record during their 
first three years at M.S.C. may trans- 
fer to one of these professional schools 
at the end of their junior year, thus 
saving one year in the period usually 
Continued on Page 4 



Make Plans For 
Improvement in 
Refuse Disposal 



Complete elimination of the unsani- 
tary storage of garbage and refuse on 
the east side of the dining hall is 
being considered as part of the pre- 
sent renovation of the entire northern 
half of the campus by the grounds 
department under the direction of 
Superintendent Armstrong. 

Adverse <riti« -ism 
At present all refuse from the din- 
ing hall is kept in containers which are 
stacked against the east wall. The 
unsightly appearance of the hall from 
the main roads has aroused comment in 
the past. The conditions have been 
further criticized because of the odor, 
and the presence of flies and rats. 

Under the proposed plan, an en- 
closed room will be added in which 
refuse will be stored until it is removed. 
It is also possible that a loading plat- 
form will be constructed to facilitate 
its removal. 

Continued on Page 5 



Students Show Value of Cooperation Plan of 

the Future by Living Together For Three Years 



•won from last year's figure. 



Cooperation may be a thing of the 
future, but for three years now a very 
successful experiment in it has been 
carried on by a small group of stu- 
dentl at this college. They are not 
a fraternity. They are not a mere 
social group. Hut they have com- 
bined the best features of both into 
an organization that has now [mated 
the experimental stage. 

Everybody Eat* 

Three years ago a self-chosen group 
of seven undergraduates and one 
graduate student, in various phases 
of their "green and salad days", unit- 
ed upon the principle that eight peo- 
ple could live more cheaply and com- 
fortably together than separately. 
They hired a house near campus, en- 
gaged a colored cook, and incorporat- 
ed as the E. E. Boys — Everybody 
Eats. 



If you think that the kitchen is 
woman'.- realm, then you are not of 
E. E. calibre. It was but a short time 
before the boys began tossing their 
own flap-jacks, burning their own 
roasts, and baking their own pies. 
What if the first pies were suggestive 
of man-hole covers? Nobody can 
gainsay that the labor of a new cook 
is hard, while the fruit of his labor 
is well-nigh adamant. 

__ 

MOD CKOSS DKIVK STARTS 

The annual Bed Cross drive on { 
the campus began today under the j 
direction of Adelphia in cooperation 
with the Student Senate. It will : 
close at the Thanksgiving holidays. 
All students will be contacted by i 
the campus sponsors. 



Too Much Work 

Cooking, dishwashing, furnace- 
tending, and house-cleaning bacaUM 
the order of the day. It soon became 
apparent, however, that the extra-cur- 
ricula activity of house-keeping W9M 
taking more than a proper share of 
time. The problem resolved itself in- 
to two courses: (1) continue house- 
keeping statu* i/nn and become a 
hardy perennial college student, or 
(2) effect chatig's enabling each man 
to more clo>elv follow th" Mate of 
Learning. 

The next year conditions were bet- 
tered when a group of six house-keep 
en descended upon an upstairs apart- 
ment in a house twenty minutes walk 
from campus through the trekb-ss 
wastes of Lover's Lane. Here house- 
keeping was limited to cooking and 

Continued on Page 6 



Admission Is Free; Tickets 
May Be Obtained at the 
Alumni Office in the 
Memorial Building 

On Monday evening, Nov. 16, the 
Music Committee will present Ernst 
Wolff in a concert of German Lieder 
in Bowker Auditorium and on the 
following afternoon, presented by the 
Fine Arts Council, Mr. Wolff will 
conduct an informal discussion of the 
relationship between music and poetry. 

Both concerts are free to students, 
but tickets must be obtained early 
from the President's Office, the Alumni 
Office, Wilder Hall, or Stockbridge 
Hall where they will be available after 
Tuesday, Nov. 10 

Program 

Mr. Wolff, in his concert on Monday 
evening, will present the following 
program: 

Si Tra I Ceppi Haendel 

Alma Mia 

Arioso (Dank Sei Dir, Herr) 
Fruehlingstraum Schubert 

Die Post 

Staendchen (Horch, Horch) 
Der Himmel Hat Eine Traene 

Geweint Schumann 

Provenzialisches Lied 
Im Hhein Im Heiligen Strome Franz 
Gute Nacht 
Bitte 

Verschwiegene Liebe Hugo Wolf 

Staendchen Brahms 

Zueignung Strauss 

Heimliche Aufforderung 

The singing of lieder is one of the 
fine arts and good lieder singers are 
very rare. No other type of song re- 
quires so fully a fine interpretative 
ability, intelligence, and musicianship. 
Mr. Wolff's exceptional musical career 
has provided a well-rounded training 
for the highly specialized field of 
lieder singing. 

I i iiii< <l am PiitniNt 

Trained as a concert pianist and 
accompanist, he later became an 
operatic conducL^r which, due to his 
belief that a conductor should have a 
good understanding of voices, led him 
to study singing. At a dress rehearsal, 
one of the actors being suddenly in- 
Continued on Page 4 

MUSICAL CLUBS TO 
PRESENT VIC PARTY 

An hour of music followed by a vie 
party is to l>e given by the combined 
musical clubs Friday evening at 7:30 
in the Memorial Building. 

Instrumental, Vneiil Select inn* 

The first part of the program, (la- 
bour of music, will include string 
ensembles, trios, as well as piano, 
violin and vocal selections Mr. arid 
Mrs. Coding and Mr. and Mrs. 
Kraker will rhaperone the vie party 
following. 

This entertainment is sponsored by 
the hoard of managers of the three 
musical clubs, and is for the benefit 
of these clubs. Dick Irving '.'!8 is 
chairman of the board. It is open to 
all students for an admission charge 
01 135 cents each or 36 cents a couple. 

The program follows: 



SOiiik l-.u-f mlili- 
Womrli , I tin 

I'l.im, s» ti-i lions 

\ lollll 

\ oi .tl N-li-i f i<m> 
Men'i Swtngttttc 

Violin Sw-li-' Until 

\ i,i .ii BbIshUubui 

llano Solectioru 



Harry Sny.W '.H 

Leon.uil I^vin '.is 

Unburn K>'< k ,S7 

Hot. Cun t'l 

JuiH-.-t K<-rr 

Helen Downing M 



O 1936, Ligoett Ac Mybrs Toimcxo Co. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 193H 







xifcaesacbuseW Collegian 



Official mn i»t of the Mavaihiwtb Slate Collr-ge. I' m : 

LOUISA. IIK1AI I.T *S7, K<liim-i:w hi'-f 

iridium K LINDSTROM '88, Managing Edltot WALTER <•! RA1 



raday by the students. 




;n k 



A~ 



Editor 



Campus 
PHILIP B, SHUT '37, Edltoi 
RICHARD < DESMOND '87 
JAMES & WALDMAN 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 
MAURICE TONKIN '38 
MARY T. Mil- II AN TO 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD ast 
THOMAS J. ENRIGH1 '39 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 
JULIAN H. KAI/II'K '38. Editor 
MAXWELL 1. KLAYMAN TO 

Al FRED M. SWIRI-N TO 
Make-up Kdltor 
KA\ MONO li. JORDAN '37 

Stockbridfte Correspondents 
RALl'M HARRIS s:57 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 

Financial Adviser 
PROP. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '.'17. Business Manager 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Adeerdaiag Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Kgr. 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38, Subscription Mgr. 

Business Assistants 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM TO WILLMM H. HARRISON » 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME TO DONALD L. SIL\ hRM AN_JS_ 



lit- eyg*g always wiu e phsl in « I,,SS - 

The** •»«' ■*■*• in ,,u " fro,,t roM ' 
with hi* Vfmm clow* "«»d "is "»«"*•» 
op.n, from ego* eggs] s»ff the l,OMr lo 
tin- other. At last the professor 
could stand it no loitiier. One 
day, when the discussion had heen 
particularly intricate, he stopped 
In the middle of his leetnre and 

saiid: 

"Gentlemen, «f have heen work- 
Inji on the hardest prohlems in 
this « ourse and there sits the man 
who need* it most, asleep." 

The stmlent jiently opened one 
eye and whispered so that all 
mi&ht hear: 

"I wish to tiod 1 were." 

— Lampoon 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



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Entered as second « la- BMttM at the Amher-t I'.-t 

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HE ASKS NO QUARTER 

IN PASSING THE BUCK 

One of the sophomores uses a rather 

novel variation of the Honor Pledge 

on his exams. He writes, " No honor 

given or received." 

BLUE MONDAY 

When men have turned 
You into fools — 
Catch other fish 
In other schools. 

Smith Weekly 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday, Nov. I -' 

7:(Xt p.m. Pvyefc. Club, BUM kbridge 

7:.;o p.m. Band rehearsal. Mem. Building 

M*>p.m. Women's Glee Club. Stockbridge 

Friday. Nov. 13 

2:00 p.m. Soccer, Wesleyan at M.S.C. 
7:30 p.m. Musical program by combined 

musical clubs. Vic party to tollow 
K:00 p.m. Dancing il.iss. Drill Hall 

Saturday, Nov. 14 

2:(K) p.m. Football. R.FI- at Troy 
;t:<l0 p.m. Cross-country. R.P.I, at Troy 

Sunday, Nov. 15 

.-,:(K> p.m. Vespers, Mfiu. Building, Dr. 
James Gordon Gilkey, Springfield 

Monday. Nov. lb 

MOOp.m. Ernst Wolff. German singer, 
Bow Iter Auditorium 

Tuesday. Nov. 17 

4:30 p.m. Ernst Wolff, informal discussion, 

Memorial Building 
7-30 p.m. Bacteriology Club. 4-H Club 
8:00 p.m. Men's Glee Club. Mem. Building 

Wednesday, Nov. 18 

7:30 p.m. Radio Club, Physics Building 
S:00 p.m. Orchestra rehearsal, Mem. Bldg. 

Thursday, Nov. 19 

7 30 p.m. Band rehearsal. Mem. Building 
8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club. Stockbridge 



Stockbridqe 



Footballers Lose 

The Stockbridge football team lost a 
heartbreaker to the National Farm 
School, Saturday at Doylestown. The 
Stockbridge team was dominant 
throughout but were unable to score. 
The Farm School lads scored in the 
third period on a fifty-yard runba. k 
of a hurried punt. Elmer Hair was 
slightly injured but is expected to be 
in shape for the Deerfield game on 
Friday, November 14 at Deerfield 
Transportation will be furnished for 
all students who wish to make the 
trip. The bus will leave the Physical 
Education Building at 1 p.m. 



Announcements 



Horticulture Show 

Several members of S.S.A. entered 
outstanding exhibits at the 19.17 
Horticulture Show. Bernard Higdon 
won first place with his exhibit of j 
foundation plantings. Donald Bald- 
win's wild life group had several in- ] 
teresting corners. Charlotte Cox, 
Nancy Pierce, H. Jenkins, F. Tucker, 
R. Heitman, and P. Golash also ex.] 
hibited. 



EDITCEIAL 

TO THE SENIORS, ESPECIALLY 

Do you ever stop to think that another June is almost here 
and that whether we like it or not, careers are inevitable for 
most of us? It is well to stop for a while and look ahead, for far 
more serious than carefree college existence is the business of life 
m This sounds like a lecture doesn't it? It isn't. We wou d 
just like to take the opportunity of looking ahead with you to 
insider where we are go ng and how we will get there. 
C This cXJian carries an item on last years alumni who 
have iobs. As a sidelight to this item we would like to point out 
that most of those jobholders had their positions before they 
were graduated ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ breadwinners to 

see what we can do for ourselves by way of jobs starting next 
June We will be out of luck if we wait until then to begin the 
hunt We should take stock right now of possible connections, 
family or otherwise in the vocations we wish to pursue. 

If there are some who intend to take graduate work else- 
where under fellowships, contacts should be made now. Even 
Though fellowships and assistantships are not definitely chosen 
unUl Apru oTso P the man who shows the most initiative stands 
the better chance. Those who plan to enter business should take 
advantage of vacation periods to make yourself known to your 

Pr ° S C iV th e eI? ^/course, there is the Placement Office. There 
has been a lot of campus comment as to the ineffectiveness of 
?he Placement Office as a job getting agency, ^o many students 
figure that all they have to do is inform Mr. Glatfelter that they 
want a job in a certain line and he will give it to him. Except in 
verv few cases is Mr. Glatfelter able to satisfy this unwarranted 
PXDectation and these exceptions are just pure luck, 
expectation a f placement director is to furnish 

students with leads which they must follow up themselves in 
order to be placed. He can tell a student where there is possi- 
hilifv of oHcement and can give the student a few timely hints 
as to how tt J approach an employer, but Mr. Glatfelter does no 

^'"Remember, the placement service for four-year students is a 
romnar^tiveh new thing on campus. It is not like the Stock- 
brSee D acement service a clearing house catering to vocations 
rather thanTo professions. The effectiveness of work under Mr 
ri«tfrlter"B immediate supervision depends on how fully a great 
number of Tudens utilize the college facilities placed at their 
number 01 ■ ^ uu « 11 |» . , th t urge alJ seniors who have re- 

$^iAr U &^'*W^™£ 'o answer it and interview 
Mr - ^^A* on campus ^determine jjjjt alumni 
are engaged fa ^™^J> : ^6^i\e^J^^ y 
80r0r A^d s we uSS Leryone who must work, and we can't 

.i- bof J ^.inrie nerson whose next year will not mean the be- 
think of a single personw „ u f hi gtock „ trade and 

^\t%L^^^SP^Xi definite connection8 

with his desired profession before graduation. 



We succumb to our better judgment 
and print this contribution. 
"Why is milk?" 
"Becows." 



Bacteriology Club 

The next meeting of the Bacteri- 
ology Club will be held Tuesday eve- 
ning, November 17, at 7:30 in the 
Farley Club House. The speaker will 
be Miss Anne Sudeman, laboratory 
technician at the Dickinson Hospital 
in Northampton. The speaker will 
begin at sight. All those taking 
bacteriology courses are invited. 



The natives of West Virginia are 
always being ribbed for their hill-billy 
simplicity. But here is the story of a 
conversation heard by a visitor to 

Cape Cod: 

A native suddenly approached an- 
other native and in excited terms said 
to him: "Hey, Newt, I walked in my 
house awhile ago and the first thing I 
noticed was some blood spots all over 
the kitchen floor. And then I seen 
how everything was all mussed up, so 
that kind of give me a start, and 1 
dropped everything and went on into 
the settin' room, and there was my 
wife stretched out on the floor, dead- 
like, with a huge club layin' alongside 
her, where somebody had knocked 
her cold. It certainly was a terrible 
surprise. Here I come home tired out 
after fishin' all day — " 

"How was the fishing?" inquired 

the friend. 

The Hoya 



Outing Club Hike 

On Sunday, November 15, the 
Outing Club will leave at 9 a.m. for 
Mt. Grey lock. 

l»svcholo£y Club 

The Psychology Club will meet to- 
night, Thursday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m. 
in Room 102, Stockbridge. All stud- 
ents interested in psychology are in- 
vited to attend. Room 102 Stock- 
bridge at 7 p.m. 

Inter. Relations Club 

The International Relations Club 
will meet on Tuesday, November 17, 
at 7 p.m. in Room 102, Stockbridge. 
Dr. Gamble of the department of 
eronomics will talk on the labor 
situation in England. All interested 
students are invited. 



A. T. G. 

The completion of Hell Week finds 
the house with twenty pledges, all of 
whom have been sent through the, 
paces of the first degree initiation. 
The second degree will take place on! 
the Common in Northampton in the 
near future' 

The arrival of one dozen roses for 
President Christenson from some 
anonymous person is source for much] 
comment this week. 



AGAIN THAT FAC t ILTTf EDITION 

This is getting to be a habit. In fact if it continues much 
InncJ it will Ret to be a monotonous habit. But we aren t to 
longer it win get i , t t t t an edition. How- 

SeTwe are 6 SfX^-^ until *£ are absolutely sure that 

the Wa^ People. 

Mr I anrhlar Mr Helming. Mr. Emery. Miss Hilberg and Mr. 
^nttonhave all offered their services, and to them, hanks. 
^iV; are Probably modest. We will see them personally. 



A kindly citizen, passing by an 
apartment house in the wee hours of 
the morn, saw a man drooped against 
the doorway. 

"What's the matter?" he asked. 
"Drunk?" 

"Yep." 

"Live in this house?" 

"Yep." 

"Want me to help you upstairs?" 

"Yep." 

With much difficulty he half dragged 
half carried the sop up the stairway 
to his second floor. 

"This the floor you live on?" 
"Yep." 

Rather than face an irate wife who 
might perhaps take him for a casual 
element, he opened the first door he 
came to and dropped the limp figure 
inside. He groped his way downstairs 
again. Going through the vestibule 
he came across another man, wrose 
off than the first. 

"What's the matter drunk?" 
"Yep," was the feeble reply. 
"Live upstairs?" 
"Yep." 

The good Samaritan half carried 
him to the second floor, opened the 
same door and pushed him in. 

Coming down again, he came across 
a third man, even worse off than the 
other two, more dishevelled, and 
bleeding from wounds on his head and 
face. He started for the man, when 
the drunk rushed out into the street 
and threw himself into the arms of a 
passing policeman. 

"For Heavenshake, off'cer," he 
gasped, "protect me from thish man. 
Hesli done nothin' all night long but 
drag me upstairsh and throw mf 
down the elevator ahaf." 

— The Torch 



Tufts Game Ticket* 

State College students may pur- 
chase at the Physical Education Office 
exchange tickets for admission to the 
cheering section at the Tufts game at 
$1.10. Members of the faculty hold- 
ing football season tickets may also 
purchase tickets in exchange at $1.10. 
All tickets sold at Medford will be 
at $1.65 each. There will be no ex- 
changes after Friday, November 20, 
4:30 p.m. 



K. K. 

K.K. announces new pledges. Class I 
of '37: A. Hoyt, P. Minkus, R. Smith, j 
J. Powers, E. Foweles; Class of '38: 
J. Lawrence M. Dnoueuaui, H. Clute, 
W. Atkins, Louis Ruggles, Herbert] 
Fiske, Charles Callis and Francis! 
Ashline. 

The house has been presented with I 
many gifts of household furnishings 
by Mrs. Frederick Webb and Mrs! 
Warren Anthony, both of Portsmouth,] 
R. I. 

Ilort. Club Organization 

All students in the Stockbridgel 
School of Agriculture, in the floricul- 
ture, horticulture, and wild life del 
part men ts, are invited to attend anj 
organization meeting of the Stock! 
bridge Horticulture Club tonight at 
7:30 in Wilder Hall. 

Mr. Nonosmith and Mr. Blundell| 
are to be the club's advisers. 



LOST Phillips' Differential Equa- 
tions. Finder return to R. B. Jordan 
at the Collegian office or to Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 



CLASS OF ItM 

Continued from Page 1 
■an Co., S tfflng ft ri d, Mm,; Bdmond L Caace, 
Consumer! iv.vi Co., Kulamasoo, Mkli ; L*o 
Carbonnean Mttwwfi GoM '"' Co., Anhsrat, 
m, . Milton Bark Cfca#e, Education, Brtdae- 
u.itn Btata Teachers' Cofleft; WilHam w. 
Chilton, Reporter, Springfield Union, Northamp- 
ton; James Clapp, Graduate School, Assistant - 
ship. Cnemtrtry, James I Kill. Durham, N. li. 

James Clarke, Worktm on farm at home in 
Milton. N. V-. Frederick Conadoa. Medical 
School, 1 ufts: fiiilip Cook, Clerk in brothers 
retail grocery -tore. Potsdam, N, V ,; Gerald D- 

( row. , The I Imv.-r Shop, s^ North St., PtttStWd; 

Kenneth Cuthbertsoo, Regional Secretary, Bmer. 
gene] Peace Campaign; J"'" 1 D aaa c sko, <;. w. 
Prentiss Co., Hotyete, Mass.; Ralph Dimock, 
working wHh tether on heme dairy (arm, Onford, 
Mass.; Donald Donnelty, Hampden County lm- 
p m s em t n t League, \v. Springfield, Mass.; Paul 
Driscotl, Hait i m a n Battleti Tres Company; 
MaWohn k Dnakar, Scotts' Nurseries, Bamta* 
hriii. Cons.; Carl Dnakar, Gradaate School, 
Assistantship, HortlcuKural Manufactures, M.S. 
c, iirriwrt Ferguson, Salesman, Gntt OH Co., 
Amherst, 

Cark*ton Pl nk e h aew Gradttate S c h oo l . Sni- 
i>iot:\ , Boston Unieersity; Allvn Ptsher, Florist, 

with f;itlirr. N u TSf UOd MaSS.j l't.mklin H. PtskC, 

National Adjustment Bureau, <'**- i«t National 
Hank Bulldlag, Ann AiIk.i. Mtch.; Patrick 
Pltsgerald, M<->li<.il School, Tnlts College; Joan 
li. Khun. Metropolitan Insurance < ".. WO Dwight 
St.. Holyoke, M.is--. Bertram Porer, Graduate 
School, Psy< hokrgy, U.C LA 

Jack Porter, Assistantship, Rutgers University; 
John I- Pianco Medical School, Tofts; Bradley 
Frye i«inlti> farm si honw, Orangp, M,ts« ■ ; A, 



Hamilton Gardner Jr.. Student salesman. Gbi 
Oil Corp., Park Square Bldg., Boston; Chester 
Gates. N. K. Dairies. Quality Control Diviabt 
l.j Murray St.. Somerville. Mass.; Lewis Gflkfl 
stock-room clerk, Leominster, Mass.; Wtllari 
tiillotte. Fruit farmin«. II. A. VVhitconib, Coaoni 
Mass. 

Lynn Glazier, Milk Inspector. Berkshire CottSOi 
Great BarrinRton, Mass.; Dean N. Click, Grab 
ate School, Umdscape Architecture, MM 
Myer Gli.kstein. Flint Lilioratory, !<■ I 
FcHowshi|i and Graduate Student, Dairy. M >'- 
Charles Glynn, Student assistant. State P»St 
Colony. Norfolk. Mas-.; Arthur J. Gold. <■ 
School, Puihllamr criminology. University ol 
( hi. ago. 

David <>oldiuan. Junior Civil F^ngineer, W.P 

forestry praject M Stonghtoa; HaroU ii- 

Farm Bureau. UtchfteM, Conn., D.»ir\ m 
Iniproveuient work for C.S.D.A.; CaUm I 
Hannim. Graduate S. li.x.I. Assistantship, M.&U 
Roy Harris, Store room clerk, F". \V. Woohrod 
( ,i.. LeO mi BS t er, Mass.; Donald II 
Medkal School, Tufts; Adin Hixon. ]'■■' 
working with father. Worcester, Mass. 

Knix-rt f. Hutt. Landscape tow factor, ol* 

tonlmry, Conn.; Stuart Jillson, Co-p 

interior decorating coaosrn. Rsssdeboro 
Carroll R. Johnson, Copy hay on Boston rrss* 

Boston; David Johnson. Stat<- t heuiist- <'^* 

\grii ultuial Experiment station, Lafayett* ln : 

Maxwell KaplOVitS, Salesman. Bonds ggd >' ■■-" 
ties, Boston; Allan M. Kaufman. I larval I m 
ness S Imol. Investment Management. 

Richard T. KaaanU, I laim Adjustei 

Mutual Life Insurance Co., Park Squar W 
Bo ton, Mass.. |. lines Kerr. Gradual. 
M.S.C.; Theodore Kerr, Farm Bureau N. 
Kxperiment Station. Nsasau Court Hon- I 
va. N. Y.; David Klukstein. Dental 
Tufts; Flmil J. Koenig. Medical School 
I Harold Krasnoff. Grarluate S hool, li 

Biology, m.I.t. 

Charles Krtil. Graduate St hool, L 
Architecture. M.S.< '.; Norvin lMul>en«t' 
Manager, I- \v. Wesrhrorth Co., Walthan 

FZdward Lavin, Graduate School 

teaching chemistry, Tufts; Reheard ' 
Genera] Chemical Company, Bakanans 
dence, R. I.; Lester H. Levlae, Gradaati 
Bducathm, M >.< .. Robert B. Lincoln.- 11 
i . B Army, Pert Oglethorpe, Ga, 
i Irvtag Upovsky, Technical Assistant 
partsnm of Baitrilulogy, M.s.< .. Robs 
Graduate School, rXadstantshlp, Oajversl 
Continued on P4 



Schsl 
i 
I 

tdsM 

i. .*«{ 
Ms) 
I,, terda 
U1 

i" 




SPORTS 




ioccer Team Wins Fifth 
Will Close Season Saturday 




The State soccermen continued their 

tinning streak by defeating Trinity, 

li. in a game played last Saturday 

[i Hertford. It was only the sterling 

„rk of the State defense that kept 

L. Hlue and Cold scoreless. Couper 

[ iu i Conway both made remarkable 

Lye* when the ball seemed headed 

ftniight for the State goal. Stan 

Todolak kept his iron man record 

L a , t playing the full time for six 

l.iist-t utive games, the first of which 

ras his starting varsity attempt. 

It was the alert forward line that 
I, counted for the point scoring. Charlie 
todd* found the Trinity nets for the 
iitial goal in the second period. Don 
bslev terminated the scoring by tally- 
n e i n the third period. 

The summary: 
■foasj. State Trinity 

Unjamin g Caboury 

udolak rf Wightman 

Tonway If Dexter 

Lcnnedy rh Hates 

fouper ch Lindsay 

L //t( . lh Schirm 

K nn rw Davidson 

Lninn ri Hope 

Ldda cf Schmidt 

Ljcy li Onderdonk 

[yJe lw O'Bryon 



FROSI1 13. SOPHS 7 



Steff '39 ran forty yards for the 
first touchdown in the first period 
of the game played between the 
two lower classes yesterday after- 
noon. Morey place kicked the 
extra point. Later in the first 
period, Zuckerman '40 caught a 
■ pass which a sophomore attempted 
■to knock down and ran thirty 
yards for the first freshman score. 
Santucci of the freshmen scored the 
final touchdown in the last period 
on a pass after the freshman had 
blocked a soph kick on the latter'B 
20-yard line. 



RUNNERS PLACE 
TENTH AT N.E.I 



►mVKKFl L WESLEYAN 

TEAM HERE SATIRDAY 

Returning to home fields after a 
LicitHsful road trip, the State soccer 
Lam will make its final stand to- 
morrow against Wesleyan. Since de- 
bating Amherst 2-0, State outplayed 
aggressive Trinity team to register 
|s fifth victory of the season. 
Wesleyan Cocky 

Tomorrow's game will be a grudge 

Tair for more than one reason. After 
laving been defeated by State for 
|vt consecutive years, Wesleyan came 

kek in '35 to administer a crushing I 
(-0 defeat. This year's Wesleyan | 
lam is a cocky outfit, champions of! 
he Little Three, who are out to con- . 
(nue a Cardinal victory in the State 

fries. 

Comparative scores are very con- 

^i»ing in determining the outcome of 

game. Wesleyan defeated W.P.I. 

j-4. State, 7-4. Wesleyan defeated 

tufts :i-0; State, 2-1. The Cardinals 

pere defeated by Conn. State 5-6, 

nri hy Trinity, 1-2. On the other 

una State defeated Conn. State, 2-1, 

nd Trinity 2-0. State lost its only 

to games to Yale, 2-0, and Williams, 

-1, but the Wesmen defeated both 

tarns by the scores of 1-0 and 2-1. 

lotb schools defeated Amherst by 

ne identical score of 2-0. 



The State cross-country team placed 
tenth out of a field of fourteen teams 
in the New England intercollegiate 
cross-country meet last Monday after- 
noon at the Franklin Park course in 
Boston. 

The first Statesman to cross the 
finish line was Lawrence Pickard who 
placed sixteenth out of approximately 
one hundred runners. Ingram placed 
twenty-seventh for State, while Ne- 
Jame and Little took fifty-second and 
fifty-third places, respectively. Samp- 
son placed sixty-first to give the 
Statesmen a total score of 209. 
Rhode IsL-ukI Wins 
The meet was won by Rhode Island 
State with a score of 82. Northeastern 
was second with 91, Maine third with 
104, and Connecticut State fourth 
with 113. The individual honors went 
to "Hawk" Zamparelli of Northeastern 
who won the meet, and to O'Connor of 
Holy Cross who placed second. 

The freshman team placed tenth 
among the eleven teams which finished 
with a score of 250. The freshman 
event was taken by New Hampshire 
with the very low score of 37. Rhode 
Island State took second place. 
Meet R.P.I, at Troy 
Next Saturday the State harriers 
will meet one of their strongest oppo- 
nents of the season in R.P.I, at Troy. 
The Tech team, which is made up of 
nearly all veterans, is undefeated this 
season. They have beaten C.C.N.Y., 
Williams, Union, Middlebury, and 
W.P.I. Hitchcox, who placed third 
for the engineers in their 22-33 vic- 
tory over the Statesmen last year, 
holds the intercollegiate record for 
the R.P.I, home course. 



Coach Charles E. "Gus" Dorais of 
the University of Detroit has evolved 
a new yardstick for the measurement 
of football players a yardstick that 
fans at all colleges and universities 
will find helpful in sizing up the 
qualifications of their athletic class- 
mates. 

1. Coordination. This implies 
muscle response and quick reflexes. 
As Dorais sees it, strength, speed and 
agility are of little use to a football 
player unless he is able to coordinate 
these qualities. Fast thinking is of 
value only when coupled with ability 
to translate the thought into instant 
muscular response. 

2. Condition. In order to play top- 
notch football a man must be in such 
perfect physical condition that he can 
go through a game, or such part of a 
game as he remains in the line-up, 
without slackening his speed or thought 
of action. 

3. Enthusiasm. No man can hope 
to be a great player without boundless 
enthusiasm for the game. 

4. Mental alertness. The great 
football player must have a fast- 
acting mind. He must be constantly 
on the alert to meet the varying 
situations that arise both on offense 
and defense. 

5. Courage. Both physical and 
moral courage of a high order are 
essential. Football entails a lot of 
hard knocks and the man who is 
afraid of getting hurt will never be a 
success at it. Moral courage implies 
ability to keep fighting in the face of 
reverses. 

6. Cooperation. A player must be 
willing to cooperate with his fellows 
and his coaches. 

7. Size. It is a well- proved axiom 
in sport that "a good big man is 
better than a good little man." For 
that reason the ideal football player 
should have a rugged physique and 
adequate weight. 

8. Mental stability. The good play- 
er will be a man who can retain his 
poise under all conditions. 

9. Application. There is a lot of 
hard work, almost drudgery, connec- 
ted with learning the fundamentals of 
football . 

10. Susceptibility to instruction. 
The ideal player must be willing to 
learn. 

Let's siae up the State team. 



Middies Sink State Team 
In 26-20 Scoring Spree 




GEORGE N1DEN 
State's ground-gaining fullback 



GRIDMEN MEET 

R.P.I. AT TROY 



With the hope of taking a weak 
Renssalaer team over the ropes on 
the gridiron next Saturday, the Ma- 
roon and White eleven will travel to 
Troy next Saturday afternoon. If we 
can rely on precedent and the record 
of the Troy outfit the Carawaymen 
ought not to experience too much 
difficulty next Saturday. 

Last year a bruised State team en- 
countered the shabby team from the 
Institute and came out victors to the 
tune of 28-13. In 1934 the victorious 
Statesmen whistled out a 32-0 win. 

So far this season the Renssalaer 
team has met five opponents, Alfred 
University, Brooklyn College, Middle- 
bury, Union, and Worcester Polytech. 
Opening with Alfred with a 14-6 win 
the Engineers broke a string of 16 
consecutive losses, but for the most 
part the record since the opener has 
not been too successful. LaBt week, 
the Men of Troy fell powerless to the 
willful W.P.I, team. 



The State team llotiiwlrrrd to defeat 
onee again la^i Saturday when it met 
the U. S. Coast Cuard Academy in 
New London where (be miniature 
Navy sailed to a 26-20 victory. This 
was the Coast d third's second win of 
the season as well as (heir curtain 
game. 

The contest was a free scoring affair 
from the beginning with Slate con 
I iriu.il! v pushing from behind. Coast 

Guard scored once in the lirst quarter, 

twice in the second, and once in the 
third. The Statesmen did not make 
their first impression on the score 
board until the second half was under- 
way when they scored once in the 
third stanza, and twice in the fourth. 

The first touchdown of lhe game 
came about midway through the first 
quarter when ('ass, perhaps the out- 
standing Middie player and quarter- 
back, dropped back for a pass to find 
all his eligible receivers covered, made 
a 40-yard run through the St a It- 
second team. 

Two more touchdowns were scored 
in the next quarter by the Guardsmen 
before the half ended 19-0. The next 
half saw State scoring three times and 
threatening often as a result of the 
Towle-Lapham combination and some 
powerful running by Niden and Brown. 

The summary: 



MdlS 
CALENDAR 

Football. Saturday, M.S.C. vs. 

R. P. I. at Troy 
Soccer. Saturday, M.S.C. vs. 

Wesleyan, here 
Crorwt County. Saturday, M.S. 

C. vs. R.P.L at Troy 



Coiisl tm.-iid 




Mil mm. State 


Whalen 


le 


Putnam 


Prins 


It 


Fisher 


W instead 


If 


Linden 


Kniskern 


c 


Bossiter 


West 


rg 


Roberge 


Leising 


rt 


Perkins 


Bakanas 


re 


Morey 


Cass 


qb 


Bullock 


Land 


lh 


Czelusniak 


Davis 


rh 


Filipkowski 


Waldron 


fb 


Steff 


Coast Guard 


scoring: 


Touchdowns, 


Cass, Davis 2 


Land; 


points after 



touchdown, Davis (placement), Schra- 
der (pass from Cass). Mass. State 
scoring: Touchdowns, Lapham, Brown 
Niden; points after touchdown, Fisher 
2 (placements). 



lOLLEGIAN CONDUCTS ALL AMERICAN POLL 
FANS PARTICIPATE IN NATIONAL TABULATION 




OLDEST COLLEGE STUDENT/ 

MRS ANGELINE WHITNEY. 92 . is enrolled 

IN THE SOCIOLOGY COURSE AT OHIO 
JTATE UNIVERSITY. MRS. WHITNEY DOL'.NT 

come to the campuf for her cla5tej, but 
from "the comrort of a chair near the 
radio jme "attew.t the classes bfcwdcast 
daily over the university t 
**?, jtation.\no;u 




Once again as the football season 

|raw> tti a close we turn our thoughts 

the annual All-American teams 

pith grjsjgj to flood the country 

trough newspapers, magazines, and 

pili" Every sports writer apparently 

«>wn ideas on the subject of 

RW Lhe All-American grid stars 

h< hi Id l>e. Kven now we are hearing 

koniini ndntions for various players 

make the All-team. 

'Ho* scar, the Collegian, in con- 

mction with the Dakota Student is 

Miduitmg a poll to determine who 

fie player* are who should receive 

ption recognition on the 1936 

• lf " Intercollegiate Sports Writers 

■America football team. This 

""On poll was begun three years 

lias achieved marked success 

! '' ^<> polls which it has already 

jBducted in 1934 and 19:if>. Its 

' >vas perhaps guaranteed be- 

1,11 ' it is a poll conducted through 

hng campi in the country, 



where the interests of intercollegiate 
football are closest to the hearts of 
the students. 

Grid fans on our campus are now 
given an opportunity to choose their 
All-team while the season is drawing 
to its peak and before a half a dozen 
other All-American teams make their 
appearance in the press. The poll as 
it will be cast on the State campus will 
be instrumental in deciding the final 
results of the Intercollegiate team. 

And if you think that this poll is 
not of any great significance remember 
its past record. Over three hundred 
men received votes from 51 schools in 
36 states of the Union. As a result 
the poll we are now conducting made 
a very good showing in the All- 
American All-American team, a mythi- 
cal football team taken from the 
consensus of seven all Americana 
conducted during the 1935 season. 
The closest approach to the perfect 
consensus team was shared by two 



groups. The Associated Press team 
failed to land only one of its men on 
the consensus team, and the National 
Intercollegiate Sports Writers poll missed 
only on Simmons at halfback. 

Here's how to vote. Pass into the 
Collegian office, or to the sports editor 
anywhere, a list of men whom you 
think ought to merit a position on the 
All-American team. Pick your first 
team, and then your second team if 
you wish, but do not include any men 
from M.S.C. on this list. After you 
have done this pick three men from 
our own team whose names you think 
ought to be included in this poll Do 
not forget to state the positions of the 
men whose names you submit, as well 
as their schools. 

This is the last chance you will get 
to be included in a national poll this 
year, so make your selections immedi- 
ately. Results of this national poll 
will be printed in the Collegian very 
shortly. 



fa 





PERPETUAL STUDENT 

W CULLEN BRYANT K.EMP 
ATTENDED CLASSES AT COLUMBIA U 
FOR OVER Z0 YEARS AFTER HIS 
FRESHMAN YEAR M IBfc* , THERE 
WAS AN INTERLUDE tH HIS EDUCATION, 
AT WHICH TIME HE ACQUIESCED TO HIS 
IA1HFRT WISHES AND ENTERED BU5INE 
BUT ON HIS FATWERJ DEATH HE 
RETURNED TO HIS STUDIES HIS 
LAH REGISTRATION WAS IN 192*' 



BU<*SNot 

An hi year 
old woman 
took. ww n\as- 
ters 0e6ree 

IN A/CH- 
AFOlO./r AT 
BROWN iJNWtRSlty 
LAS i TEAR' 



*$ 



CVfyrsf hr r>* A v 



X* 



Viirgflifflrt 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 
Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 664 



Northampton, Mass. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMRER 12, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1936 



Outdoor Scenes Photographed In 

Technicolor By Professor Barrett 



When the Winter Carnival rolls 
around this year, most of the outdoor 
scenes will he filmed in technicolor, 
according to an announcement from 
I'rofessor Rollin H. Barrett. 

Twenty-five thousand feet of film 
nearly five miles of it give a graphic 
account of the eight years spent hy 
Professor Barrett in following his 
hohhy of amateur moving picture 
photography. Professor Barrett is an 
instructor in the department of agri- 
cultural economics and farm manage- 
ment on campus. 

In 1928 Professor Barrett adopted 
the candid camera as I he method hest 
adapted to illustrate differences in 
efficiency in the performance of the 
same task. His first effort in this 
direction was a film showing the time 
and effort saved by using the most 
efficient method in the seeding of 
potatoes. This film was the first of its 
kind, and its success was immediate. 
Dr. W. Seedorf, of the University of 
Gottingen requested a copy of the 
film for use in German agriculture. 

As the success of his films became 
known, Professor Barrett produced 
more of them. He made films showing 
the proper way of spraying, harvest- 
ing, and marketing apples, of which 
the U.S.D.A. and Copenhagen co- 
operative societies requested copies. 
His more recent films include shots of 
the harvesting, sorting, and packing 
of such market produce as lettuce, 
celery, asparagus, carrots, and beets. 
These films have been shown at 
meetings of the Connecticut, Massa- 
chusetts and New York Vegetable 
Growers Association as well as at the 
National Association of Vegetable 
Growers. 

Not all of Professor Barretts' films, 
however, deal with efficiency of farm 
management. In the last two years he 
has shot more than four hundred feet 
of film showing the soccer team in 
action. Two years ago he made 
pictures of the Connecticut and Wes- 
leyan games here, and this year he 
filmed the Yale and Amherst games. 
Because of the constant activity of 
the ball, it is extremely difficult to 
make a film of this type. Coach 
Larry Briggs finds these films indis- 
pensable in the instruction of his 
team. So far as is now known, these 
soccer pictures are the only ones ever 
filmed anywhere. By speeding the 
camera up to 64 pictures per minute, 
slow motion pictures can be shown at 
the normal rate of 16 pictures per 
minute. 

The Winter Carnival of last year 
provided Professor Barrett with a 
good subject for a fiction, and he shot 
several hundred feet of it. These 
films have had a wide showing in high 
schools throughout the state, among 
them Worcester and Gloucester high 




SINGS AT BALL 



<To»et> Hews 



Lambda Delta Mu 

On Monday, Nov. 16, the patron- 
esses of the sorority will be dinner 
guests at the house. 

Plans are underway for the sorori- 
ty's part in the round-robin tea for 
all sorority patronesses on Sunday, 
Nov. 15. Louise Rutter '38 is in 
charge. 

We announce with pleasure four 
new members of the sorority: Beryl 
Briggs, Betty Jasper, Phyllis Mac- 
Donald, and Grace O'Donnell, all of 
the class of 1939. 



A photograph of the photographer 
Professor Barrett 



ERNST WOLFF 

Continued from Page 1 
disposed, Wolff took the baritone part 
and sang it so well that his operatic 
colleagues urged him on as a singer, 
predicting the great success which he 
has since realized. 

Of Mr. Wolff and his program Bruno 
Walter, the renowned conductor, has 
written, "Herr Wolff is a most gifted 
young artist with a special talent for 
the singing of Lieder to his own 
accompaniment. His full musician- 
ship and warm heart enable him to 
make a deep impression on his listen- 
ers and the high artistic standard of 
his achievements is supported by the 
excellent technical domination of his 
fine baritone voice." 



Sigma Beta Chi 

A combined birthday dinner was 
given on Wednesday in honor of the 
birthday of Mrs. Flanders, and Perky 
Bradford. 

Phi Zeta 

An announcement has been re- 
ceived of the marriage of Bernice 
Dolan '35. 

Mrs. Melvin Taube, a former ad- 
viser of the sorority, sent a silver tray 
to the sorority. 

Virginia Connor has been chosen as 
the Phi Zeta representative at the 
progressive tea to be held this coming 
Sunday. 




CHAPERONES FOR 
BALL ANNOUNCED 



Art In Industry 
Shown By Films! 

Art in industry was the theme of 
moving pictures presented last Tu.-s. 
day afternoon in the Memorial Build- 
ing as another in the series of fine art* | 
programs. 

By means of pictures and priniwjj 
comment flashed on the screen, 
brief analysis of the nature of aril 
was given. Variation of spaces, in- 
eluding small, medium, and large, was| 
cited as an important factor in achiev. 
ing beauty. This attribute is common I 
to nearly all objects we consider 
graceful. Line, light and dark, and 
color were called the materials o(| 
beauty. As an example of the opera- 
tion of this principle, the film illus-l 
trated the use of full, curved line^ M 
give a religious character, and shon, 
abrupt lines to give a dramatic effect, 
Next week at the same time, 4:3o| 
Tuesday afternoon, the Fine Arte 
Council will present Ernst Wolff, I 
German singer. Admission will b*l 
limited to those holding tickets, which] 
may be secured free of charge at the! 
Alumni Office or at Wilder Hall. 



Alpha Lambda Mu 

Tea Friday afternoon in Abbey 
center. Beatrice Davenport '39, ecc i 
chairman, is in charge. 




Shows daily 2:30 6:30 8:30 



schools and Quincy Junior and Senior 
high schools. These films will be 
shown on campus prior to the Winter 
Carnival this year. 

And so Professor Barrett goes on 
with his shooting, making films here 
and there as opportunity presents 
itself. Strong in his faith of visual 
education, he believes that the mov- 
ing picture camera is the best teacher 
for all types of techniques. His work 
has received editorial commendation 
in the Boston Herald and several of 
his articles on agricultural technique 
have been published in agricultural 
journals. Picture making with Pro- 
fessor Barrett has become more than 
a hobby it is now an avocation. 



Thur*.. Nov. 12 

The Musical Comedy Riot! 

"Sing Baby Sing" 

with Adolphe Menjou 
Alice Faye and big cast 



Word has reached the military ball 
committee that Irene Janis, feature 
singer will be brought to Amherst 
December 4 to appear with Felix 
Ferdinando at the military ball. This 
is an added attraction with no increase 
in prices, the committee announces. 

Chaperones of the ball will be Lt. 
Col. and Mrs. Horace T. Aplington, 
Major and Mrs. Leo B. Connor, 
Captain and Mrs. Harold P. Stewart. 
Invited guests are President and Mrs. 
Hugh P. Baker, Dean and Mrs. Wm. 
L. Machmer, Dr. and Mrs. Ernest J. 
Radcliffe, the commanding officer of 
the first corps area and the officer in 
charge of civilian component affairs 
for the first corps area. 

An effort is also being made to 
bring military students from nearby 
colleges to Amherst for this affair. 
For purposes of restatement, tickets 
are $3.50 and may be purchased from 
Kenwood Ross, Bob Couhig, Wendell 
Lapham, Leroy Clark, Louis Breault 
and Robert Lyons. 



Music Record Club 
Receives First Gift 

The Music Record Club, formed fori 
the benefit of those students who likel 
to enjoy music at their leisure will i I 
ready to make an opening on Monday,! 
Nov. 16. The collection of records! 
will be available at the Goodelll 
Library and may be taken home by I 
members of the club. 

The first gift to the club consists ofj 
four albums of records presented byl 
Mr. Frank Homeyer, an alumnus oil 
the college. The acquisitions of thel 
club through its own funds include! 
compositions by such artists as Beet I 
hoven, Schubert, Bach, Borodin.1 
Brahms, Dvorak, Bizet, Strauss, Mol 
zart, Chopin, Debussy, Wagner, and| 
Tschaikowsky. 



B-R-R-R-R 

With the football season and presi- 
dential campaign in full swing, you 
don't want to be annoyed with 
STATIC. Let us repair your Radio 
or give you a price for turn-in value. 

Iff MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

Hacdw-™ B.eetncn. «' MaM 

35 Pleasant Street rt 



Fri.-Sat., Nov. 13-14 

Clark Gable, Marion Davies 
in 

"Cain and Mabel" 

— 2nd feature — 
Chester Morris, Fay Wray, in 
"THEY MET IN A TAXI" 

— pltlS 

"MARCH OF TIME" 



YES! 

I'M CiOINCi TO 
THE MILITARY BALI- 



MEET AT 



Postpone Talk By 
Professor Schel 

The talk by Professor Erwin Hi 
Schell of the Massachusetts Instituttl 
of Technology, scheduled for nefil 
Thursday's convocation, has b«l 
cancelled. 

A special program to replace it »l 
now being planned. 



Sun.-Mon.-Tue«., Nov. 15-17 

Walter Huston, Ruth Chatterton, 
Mary Astor, in 

"DODSWORTH" 

—extra — 
Mickoy Mouhp Cartoon 

"Sport in the Alps" 
Latest Pathe News 



BARSEIOTTI'S CAft 

BALLANTINE'S ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 
Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



CO-OP AGREEMENT 

Continued from Page 1 

required for professional training. 

Upon completion of a year's workj 
at the professional school, and uj 
recommendation from that school, 
student may be awarded his Iwbfj 
lor's degree from M.S.C. 



Wed.-Thur*., Nov. 18-19 

Gary Cooper in 

"The General 
Died at Dawn" 



BOOK WEEK, NOV. 15 to 21 



— Soon — 
"Biji HroadraHt of 1937" 



Illustrated Editions 
$1.00 

Cameo Classics 
59c 



U. S. Camera, 1936 
$2.90 

Had Parent's Garden of Vers* 
by Ogden Nash $2.00 

Great Aunt Lavinia hy J. C. Lincoln $2.50 
Mr. Pinkerton has the Club $2.00 

JkMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our liifch-ilaHsed work 
Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 




PLAID WOOL SHIRTS 

All wool in bright plaids $3.95 to $5. 
Heavy cotton plaids at $1.50 
Don't miss seeing the new Interwoven wool sox. 
Priced 50c to $1.65 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five yean 




College Candy Kitchen 



A NICK TKKAT AT THE KARRIS 

this week-end with your friends. Lunch or Dinner or refreshments. 

Home Made Pastry. 



ECE1VE FAVORABLE COMMENT 
UPON ALUMNI RADIO PROGRAM 



gj ...h-nts and alumni alike of Massa- 
Ihu* lts ^tate College agree that last 



I'ei 



5 



. radio broadcast in connection 
j,l, t he annual Alumni Night meet- 
is the most interesting of the 
radio broadcasts hitherto pre- 
dated. 

Alumni groups in twenty cities 
hroughout the United States and in 
, r i(, Rico were able to "listen in" to 
u„. broadcast through the medium of 
,,i nave. On campus, student 
ouui were assembled around every 
ble radio to hear the radio 
tdcast of the college. 
U illard's tirandsoii Listen* 
,\n interesting side-light reveals 
•at when Daniel Willard, president 
f the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and 
member of the class of '82, was 
^.n tinned by Ralph Taber '16, presi- 
dent of the Associate Alumni of 
S ('.. DeVoe H. Willard '38, grand- 
n of Mr. Willard, was seated in 
mt of a fraternity radio, listening in. 
All comments made by listener- 
mil rs spoke well for the program. 
in- students were highly impressed 
hth the musical selections and com- 
»nted on the familiarity of the situ- 
liorw mentioned in the skit. 

. enjoyed the radio broadcast 

much. A copy of Sons of Old 

\sachusettB has been resurrected 

m ( (1 since," wrote in one alumnus 

1 b college; "three cheers for the 

Clad to hear the voice and 

of the president." 

Continued on Page 6 

>atterson Players 
Select New Plays 

Meeting last Thursday night, the 
i m Players heard a reading of 

O'NehTs "Bound for CardifT," 
resented by Mr. James Curtis, Mr. 

fde Dow, and Mr. Alan Chadwick. 
Jaaa lor the Patterson Players' win- 
Ir program of plays will be made by 
V executive committee at a meet- 
ly ome time this week. 

iThia year's officers of the Patterson 

jayera elected earlier in the season, 
lude, as president, Dr. Ernest J. 

tdcliffe; secretary-treasurer, Mrs. 

tdcliffe; and director, Mr. Alan 

nadwick. 



j mi 

Ion I 



Kenneth MacArthur 
Appointed To Staff 

Kenneth C. MacArthur of Sterling, 
a graduate of Harvard in 1904, has 
been appointed to the position of 
assistant professor of rural sociology 
at the college. 

Mr. MacArthur received his master 
of arts degree from Harvard in 1905. 
From 1910 to 1919 he was a chaplain 
in the U. S. Army and is at present 
chaplain with the rank of captain in 
the 182nd Infantry, Massachusetts 
National Guard. He has held posts 
as rural secretary and executive secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts Federation 
of Churches, chairman of town and 
country department of the Massa- 
chusetts Council of Churches, and 
secretary of the New England Town 
and Country Church commission. He 
has appeared before student groups 
at M.S.C. as a lecturer on various 
topics in rural sociology. 

WINTER SCENES IN 
PRESENT SHOWING 
OF CAMERA CLUB 



STATEMENTS FOR 1935 - 1936 

In order to give students and others connected with the college an oppor- 
tunity to see how much money the various student activities require, the 
Academic Activities Board and the Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics have issued these statements of expenditures during the period of July 
1, 1935 to June 6, 1936. 

Among the academic activities the Collegian received the most money 
while the Index was given the second largest appropriation. The Women's 
Glee Club with a budget of less than $40 comes out on the bottom of the list. 
The football expenses of $8269.55 overshadowed all the other athletic 
activities. There was a deficit of $3139.31 in the football budget, that is, 
this sum of money was expended above the amount taken in. 
I'in.i 11c i.i 1 Report of Academic Activities 
for the Year Endinu June 30, 1936 

Receipt* Expend Hit n-s 

$ 581 27 

3.982 04 

151 10 

160 05 

39 84 

3.373 22 

63 11 

689 84 

1,326 67 

1 .511 88 



Balance, July 1, 1935 


$1,055 92 


Band 


589 69 


Collegian 


4.502 32 


Debating 


188 54 


Glee Club (Men) 


166.67 


Glee Club (Women) 


36 67 


Index 


3.388 88 


Orchestra 


46.66 


Roister Doisters 


681 21 


General Fund 


1.223 26 


Balance on hand, June 30, 1936 






$11,879 02 



$11,879 02 



Fimmeial Report of the Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics 
For the Year Ending June 30, 1936 

Receipts Disbursements 



[HR1STMAS TREE 
AT OLD LIBRARY 



|Sd.(tion of the large pine growing 
tin southeast corner of the Old 
ir.irv as this year's campus Christ- 
Tree has been announced. In 
fmer years a tree has been brought 
;iihI erected near the pond with 
11 ' xpense to the college. 
\3m in the future of the tall tree 
lated near the intersection of walks 
J the mirth end of the pond, because 
its 1 iinspicuousness and central 
tatton 1- Ixing urged, it is reported. 



Winter landscapes are the most 
prominent feature of the present ex- 
hibit of photographs in Goodell Li- 
brary, a collection contributed by the 
Brattleboro Camera Club of Vermont. 
Wintcrhrook 

Winterbrook by Fred C. Adams is 
typical of several of these, representing 
a partially ice-bound stream with 
snowy banks. Although these prints 
portray well the beauty of winter, 
there is too much similarity among 
them, since three pictures are nearly 
identical in theme. Skyward by Joseph 
B. Sanford is outstanding in compo- 
sition, presenting a striking contrast 
in black and white. 

A great deal of human interest is 
attached to the print which holds fea- 
ture position, The Student, by Lewis R. 
Brown. An old man is shown poring, 
through heavy spectacles, over a close- 
ly written volume. The degree to which 
this portrait reveals the subject's 
character is remarkable. 

The Cat Call 

Outstanding among the other photo- 
graphs is The Cat Call, a clever pic- 
ture with a clever title. Nature's 
Lace by Henry C. Culver shows at 
close view the dainty filagree of a 
spider's web. Reflections is a particu- 
larly lovely landscape, There are also 
two impressive pictures by Dr. A. L. 
Pettee. 



Balance July 1, 1935 
Student Tax 1935-1936 
Season Tickets 

Federal Tax on Sale of Tickets 
Sale of Athletic Goods 
Sports: Football 

Soccer 

Track 

Basketball 

Hockey 

Swimming 

Baseball 

Golf 
General Administration, Maintenance 

and Equipment 



1 
5, 



$16,605 45 
467 00 
384 80 
008.72 
070 24 
35 00 
527 20 
903 47 
425 00 
5 25 
939 80 



123 74 



$ 384 80 

871.94 

8,269 55 

684 07 

2,251 25 

2,055 92 

1,074 43 

427 94 

1 .604 14 

15 00 



Balance 

$ 3,040 98 

16,605.45 

467 00 

136 78 

3,199 31 

649 07 

1,724 05 

1,152 45 

649 . 43 

422 69 

664 . 34 

15.00 



4-H CLUB TO BE 
CHRISTMAS GIFT 
SALE SPONSOR 

The Massachusetts State College 
4-H club will sponsor a Christinas (lift 
Sale, to he held at the Farley 4-H Club 
House on Prid£y ( November 20. and 
Saturday, November .21, Charles E. 
Eshhach, president of the organiza- 
tion, announced today. 

All the articles in the sale have been 
mad*' by 4-H club memhers throughout 
the state, and will make excellent 
gilts for Christmas. The money real- 
ized from the sale will go to the cluh 
j members who made the articles. Arti- 
i cles include aprons, handkerchiefs, 
i book-ends, needle- hooks, and pin- 
cushions, kitchen sets, stuffed toys, 
needle and thimble cases, stocking 
dolls, leather belts, fireplace cones, 
dolls, silhouettes, doll quilts, knitting 
hags, dressed dolls, grape jelly, pickU»s, 
curtain pulls, and doll luncheon sets. 
The sale will open on Friday, Nov- 
ember 20, from 3 to 5:30 and 7 to 9; 
and on Saturday, November 21, from 
2 to 5:30. The sale is in charge of a 
committee made up of Phyllis Mac- 
Donald '37, Margaret Calkins *37, 
and Angella Filios '37. 



8,687 45 8,563 71 



$26,495 67 $26,326 49 $ 



TOTALS 
Balance June 30, 1936 
In addition to the above balance of $3,210.16 there is a reserve fund 
on deposit at the Amherst Savings Bank to the credit of the Athletic- 
Department in the following amounts: 

Athletic Fund 

Athletic Field Fund 



CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 

Continued from Page 1 

Parking Areas Cleared 

The new parking area behind Dra- 
per Hall, an improvement undertaken 
on the north side of the campus fol- 
lowing the paving of the road in 
front of Goessmann, has been entirely 
cleared, and is ready for surfacing. The 
hank of soil pushed up on the north 
side will serve as a wind-break this 
169 18 winter. Under present plans, it will be 
3,210 16 seeded and graded until the loam is 
needed for campus lawns. 

A private parking space for faculty 
meml>ers at Goessmann Lahoratory 
will he created behind the building 



PATRONIZE Ol'R 
ADVERTISERS 



Sheaffer, Parker and Waterman FOUNTAIN PENS 
l'i< Si,, m ped Stationery Daily and Sunday Papers Delivered 

A.J.Hastings TKffiSST - 17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 



Only dry cleaning plant in town. 



Wi 



called for and delivered 



Telephone 828 



Second Mathematics 
Meeting November 18 

Three students will address the 
Math Club at its next regular meet- 
ing to be held next Wednesday eve- 
ning at 7 p.m. in the Mathematics 
building. The three students from 
the two upper classes will speak on 
three interesting phases of mathe- 
matics. 

Royal Allaire '38 will speak on the 
Mathematical Treatment of a Prob- 
lem in Physics. Norman Clark will 
speak on the Connection between 
Mathematics and our Calendar. Helen 
Warner will speak on the Graphic 
Solution of a Trigonometric Equation. 

All the students interested in mathe- 
matics are welcome to attend the 
meeting. 



ROOM AND BOAKI> 
NEAR THE COLLEGE 

Rooms: $2.25 per week 

Board: $6.00 per week 
At Mrs. Webb's on Baker Lane 
In the rear of the Colonial Inn 

Paddles For Sale 



$1,652 25 

13.61 I adjacent to the the new general park- 
| ing area. Other improvements at 
Goessmann have included the plant- 
ing of trees in front of the building 
and the leveling of lawns. 

New lliuh"a\ (irmled 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 
By Expert Barbers 



North Dorm. 



M.S.C. Campus 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 




Mass. State 
students are 
invited to our 
store for the 

latest in 

riding toga 

and 

sportwear. 



We stock breeches, riding hoots. 
Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



Frankoma Pottery 

Bowls, Creams and Sugars 
Vases, Pitchers 

CIIRIKTMAK CARDS 

miss Cutler' $ Gift Shop 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Complete line of 

COLLEGE SRAL JEWELRY 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

with your name printed free 

50 for S9e ?5 for 8»r 

50 for 1.30 25 for 1.45 

See our samples ORDER NOW 



With the new county highway 
through the east side of the campus 
practically completed, the grading and 
loaming of the roadside is being car- 
ried out in co-operation with plans of 
the Superintendent of Grounds. The 
county is erecting a cable fence on the 
west side of the highway from the 
Waiting Station to the Experiment 
Station. 



Pipe Lovers 

FOR TEN DAYS ONLY 

WE ARE OFFERING A 

3.50 ROMANO PIPE 

for only 

98c 

All tobaccos, Cigars find Cigarettes 
at cut rate prices 

Wellworth Pharmacy 

THE CUT RATE STORK 
We Deliver I'hone 1J8 



AFTKK THE BIO GAME 

CELEBRATE AT 

< I ANI 4 NH D*M 

MMVN VM 

Dine, Wine and Dance 
The finest in quality 

Foods ami Hcvcrngcs 

Just below the Town Hall 



IIYGEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



75c 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



nn MASSAOU mil COiLtfgug. Thursday, novembek 12. me 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



UK KEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES 



College Outfitter 



CLASS OF 1»36 

Continued from Page 2 
Kentu.ky. I-ramis lx,rd. Jn.l Lieut.. U. B. Army. 
Troop A. Port Ethan Allen. Vfci Thomas U>rd. 
Graduate School. Assiatantship. Hacter,olo K y. 
Url.ana. 111.; John L, NUConchie *»-««; 
Kendall Co.. Wslpoto. Mass.; Abraham M.chael- 
son. druK clerk, stuclyinK pharmacy- 

Harold MidKley. 2nd I.ieut.. U. S. Army. Km 
Fthan Allen. Yt.; Philip B. Miner, Graduate 
School. AadatantaWp, Ba. -l.-riotony. *"<«"* l ■* 
vcsi.y. New Hrun*wi,k. N. J', Oorge Monroe. 
Medfeld State Hospital. Medl.eld. Mass.; Charta 

II. Mora*. General Seafood* I Boston Kith >;•'■ 

Boston. Mass.. mechanic Fred Murphy. Wm. 
Hilenes Store. Boston. Ma,s.. Samuel N.-u.n.ui. 
Graduate School, Lar.RuaK.-s and Literature. 
M S C 

Kenneth B. Newman, (iraduate School. Hoftl- 
C ulturalM...n,la.l.i.es. M.S.C.; WilUau. Newman. 
Graduate School. M.S.C.; Clarence Packard. 
Commercial photonrapher. Amherst. Mass., Mo- 
ward C Palter, Teacher and BMNN -'"t coach 
Sanborn Seminary. Kington, N. H.. PJctexd 
Peckham. Mailing and UI IM HUTT serv.ce. Am.-n- 
can Mutual Liability Insula... .• Co.. 143 BerWey 
St.. Boston. Mass.; Leater PWeratm. (..adu.ue 

School, fellowship. Plant P..thnlo«y Cornell I . m- 
versity. Ithaca. M. V. 

Clare Pineo. Kmertsency Peace Campaign, 
Daniel C. Plastndge. Graduate School. Agncul 
tural Economics and Farm Management. II.S.C. 
Harry Pratt. Graduate School. Kntonmlo^ 
M SC- Raymond Proctor, running da.iy l..nn, 
Elm Road, Lunenburg. Mass.. Albert Richards. 
Asaistant biologist, private marine laboratory. 
Dusbury. Mass.; Richard G. Kiley. Ass.slant 
chemist and coloring. The tare Wool I ombmg 
Co.. South Barre. MM. 

William Rose, Med.cal School. Tuft*.; I hark* 
Roys, in charge of home farm and store; Jack 
Rutstein. (iraduate study; Addison Sandford. 
F. A. Bartlett Tree Co.. 798 Memorial Drive 
Cambridge. Mass.; Arnold 



„„!,- xdmin^ration. I.arv:.,... <-,>.*• W. success in 'getting over' all the subtle 

Simmons Jr., Lands. ape foreman and draftaSMO, J bits of nostalgia." 

A member of the class of '35 wrote 



Santa Fc. N. M. 

B ^,SBa^."a£EMn~iS="aw ***** * «. 

United Parmer'. Cooperative Corp.. Charleslown. nature help greatly to bring tne 
Mas-.; Kdward Soulliere. Agent. Traders In accomp l i8 h m entS of M.S.C. before the 

,,„.„,.,. ,,., W^^^J2i^*taS! people of Massachusetts. I thoroughly 
Emm County Agri. ultural School. Haihome. Qne Jj e very SOOn." 



"Very Touching" 

"Was very pleased with the Alumni 



School. Haihome 
Edward suil.v..... atedtcal School. Tufts. 
Ralph F. Sweinbergcr. Topographical surveying, 
drafting. P. J. Kennedy. Inc.. Holyok.-. Mass.; 
Royal K Tanner. ( irays Dia,--ry Shop. ^1 Ma." . Broadcast. The 'father 

a te School of Dealt*; Richard H. Thompson. comes the message from a member oi 

As,i,tant, Cos,. Dept.. Rodney Hunt Machine 
Co.. Orange. Mass. 



metal container: Fred Davis. 

Miniature bouquets: Marion New- 
hall S'37. 



Winners in wild life exhibits, con- 
ducted by the Stockbridge students: 
first, Guilford Hanks, Roger Taylor, 
John Sloet; second, Michael Mis- 
kewich, Edwin Benchley, Thomas 
Boyce, Henry Griffin, and Gilbert 
Wright. 



S. Shulkin. School of 



RADIO BROADCAST 

Continued from Page 5 

Liked Drama tit- Skit 

"Everyone got a real kick out of 
the broadcast, particularly the dra- 
matic skit," was the report from an 
alumni meeting at Salem, Mass. "It 
was cleverly conceived, and the play- 
ers are to be congratulated upon their 



the class of 1911, now living in Florida 
A broad sense of humor inspired one 
alumnus in Vermont to write: "We 

we 

■were rewarded with was a mess of 

static. L said that it must be 

that M was trying to get even 

with us for voting Republican up 
here." 

The program was under the super- 
vision of Robert Hawley '18, secretary 
of the college, and Francis Pray '31, 
head of the M.S.C. News Service. 
The skit used was written by Mr. 
Pray. 



George Vassos. second year medi. al student 
, ,„„,,! Medical Center. N.V.C ; Walter Wainio 

bateaat. Institute of Animal Nutrition. Gradu- 1 aU tried tQ fo ien t o WBZ. All 
,„. s. hoot. Pennsylvania State College; Roger U 
Warner, Teacher. BUchertown. MM 
G Whaley, Graduate BchOOi Botany. C olumbia. 
N y C SpofTord WaJteker, Salesman, American 
Agricultural Chemical Co.. North Weymouth. 
Ma» Luther Willard. Graduate School. I mv. 
.',, Michigan; Jotal Wood. 2nd Lieut.. Troop B, 
3rd Cavalry. U. S. Army. Fort Ethan Allen. \ t. 



Judges of the student competition 
were Mrs. Robert B. Parmenter of 
Amherst, Mrs. Nelson C. Holland of 
Belchertown, and Miss Kate Ries 
Koch, Smith College. 



HORTICULTURE SHOW 

Continued from Page 1 

Arrangement of fruit branches in a 



The horticultural show was under 
the general direction of Professor 
Clark L. Thayer, head of the depart- 
ment of floriculture. The student 
committee arranging the show was 
headed by James W. Hodder and 
includes John A. Tuttle '37, olericul- 
ture; Norman W. Butterfield '37, 
floriculture; Lee Rice, Jr. '37, pom- 
ology; Robert Thorndike '37, land- 
scape architecture; Ralph Gates '37, 
store; Philip Layton '37, publicity; 
Walter Simonsen '37, horticultural 
I manufactures; Clarence Benson S'37, 
I forestry and wild life; Edwin S. 
I Holmes S'37, horticulture. 



COOPERATION PLAN 

Continued from Page 1 
dishwashing. Here the project begatl 
to take on an air of permanency. N 
matter if the spring flood did hM 
two erstwhile brooks roaring shin-highj 
over the Lane for a couple of morn| 
ings. Class must keep. 

Seven Thi» Year 
Longfellow's poem "We Are Sev- 
en" has an apt application to thd 
house this year. The seven members! 
include four seniors: Hilly Friedman] 
"Red" Lilly, Mel Cohen, and Phill 
Shiff; two juniors, Larry LeviiisoJ 
and Al Swiren ; and one sophomore-, Eel 
Malkin. Many of the extra-curriculil 
activities on campus are representee! 
here, viz., Collegian, Index, debating! 
football, dramatics, and the band! 
Twice in the last two years has the! 
house been honored by Phi Kappa Phi! 
The group is comprised entirely! 
of non-fraternity men and, althoug'J 
they have no intentions of becoming! 
a fraternity, they aim to be self peiT 
petuating. Cooperation is the kejl 
note of the whole organization. ThJ 
system at present delegates four dishl 
washers to clean up after the thr«| 
cooks. Each man has definite duties 
which are an integral part of an orl 
derly schedule. They have soocl 
! board and plenty of it. And the sa.| 
ing in cost is appreciable. 










\4 -ar? 






Few things that grow require all 
pMlt tfo e car e and cultivation it takes 
to raise the mild, ripe tobaccos 
in Chesterfield Cigarettes. 



Proper curing by the farmer 
gives flavor to Chesterfield 
tobaccos /ust as it does to 
fine hams and bacon. 




TfFTS AT 

MKDFORD 

SAT. 




14. 



A. CaOfckfy^y. 

State u^ieue 



" 




VACATION 

BKi.INS 

AT NOON 

WED. 



Vol. XLVH 



AMHERST. MASSACHUSETTS. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 1936 



No. 9 



11 Competitors Begin jSPALDING TO 
Probationary Period BE FEATURE 

OF CONCERT 



;ieven Freshmen, Two BAND LEADER 
Sophomores Included in 
Group; Trial Period to 
End in February 



Surviving a six weeks competition, 
eleven students have been elected to 
[he Collegian for a probationary trial 
jjeriotl. The new members were chosen 
from an original group of over forty 
bompetitors, and after a try-out on 
[he regular staff will be elected to the 
poard at the last meeting of the present 
Incumbents. 

Co-eds are well represented among 
Ihe new reportorial talent, taking 
even of the eleven available positions. 
Jf the seven, two are sophomores and 
|hc remainder are freshmen. All of 
Ihe lour men are freshmen. The new , 
nemberi will begin their duties with : 
[he publication of next week's edition, i 
The two sophomores are Bettina , 
lall and Mabelle Booth, both ofi 
foxboro. Both are members of. 
L.inilxla Delta Mu sorority, and Miss 
lall is, in addition, a member of the 
/omen's Athletic Association. 
The freshmen are Arthur A. Noyes 
If Lawrence, John Filios of Westfield, i 
Carolyn E. Monk of Groton, Nancy E. j 
Lee of Fitchburg, Dorothy Merrill of | 
lorwood, Joseph Bartasiewicz of 
Northampton, S. Elizabeth Stutsman 
If South Hadley, Franklin M. Davis 
|f Walt ham, and Jacqueline Stewart 
Amherst. All but two were gradu- 
ated from high schools in the above 
pentioned towns. Noyes was gradu- 
ated from Lawrence Academy and Miss 
Itewart was graduated from Leaven- , 
Jorth High School in Leavenworth, ' 
ansas. 



WINTER CARNIVAL 
PLANS PROGRESS 




Plans for the 1937 Winter Carnival 
iv moving along at a fast rate with 
^vcr.il new features already assured, 
Jilip 1). Layton, chairman of the 
krni\ al committee announced, today. 
A< r.fmg to Layton the latest inno- 
tion is freedom for students from 
hnea the Saturday morning of carni- 
kl week-end. 

[Gene tlieringer, new chairman of 
|nu r ports for the carnival, has 
ins for an intercollegiate ski 
eet to he held at Bull Hill. Bus 
■asportation will be assured those 
phing to attend the meet. 

I last meeting the committee 
Continued on Page 6 

[oister Doisters in 
Tryouts This Week 

fryouts for the Roister Doister 
^faction of "The Night of January 
Will take place tonight, Nov. 19, 
[Room 110, Stockbridge, at 8 p.m. 
lis i> , annual winter play spon- 
pd by the Roister Doisters, dra- 
WC RTOup of the college. 

larKi> r a8 t to be chosen for the 

pluction will afford those dramatic- 

;, < -d students a chance to take 

ia presentation. It is a new 

ing bom recently written, 

'urnish an opportunity to 

new play not widely played. 

'tion in the play will be 

ni K a jury for the court 

" the members of the 



FELIX FERDINANDO 

Honorary Colonel 
To Be Selected 
At Military Ball 



A feature of the military ball this 
year will be the selection of an honor- 
ary colonel by a group of military 
majors in cooperation with the chap- 
erones, the committee announced re- 
cently. 

Anyone Can Vi it -ml 

Some concern has been expressed 
by freshmen as to whether or not they 
will be allowed to attend the ball. 
The committee states that the ball is 
open to anyone who wishes to attend. 
To this end invitations have been 
issued to students of the Stockbridge 
School and to military students from 
other colleges. Several Norwich stud- 
ents have already indicated that they 
will come to Amherst December 4 for 
the affair. 

Felix Ferdinando and his Park 
Central Orchestra will play for the 
affair and, as previously announced, 
tickets are $3.50 per couple. Only 150 
tickets will be available. 



To Appear at Community 
Concert Here Monday 

Albert Spalding, violinist, will pre- 
sent the first of a series of concerts 
sponsored by the Amherst Community 
Concert Association on Monday, Nov. 
23, at 8 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. 

Mr. Spalding was born in Chicago, 
and studied abroad. He is recognized 
as the foremost American concert 
violinist. Mr. Spalding makes him 
home in Great Barrington, Mass. He 
is an active participant in the Berk- 
shire Symphonic Festival, and is one 
of the few concert violinists to appear 
in radio. 

The program is as follows: 

I 

Sonata in E Haendel 

Adagio, Allegro, Largo, Allegro 
Concerto, G Minor, Opus 26 Bruch 
Prelude Allegro moderato 
Adagio 

Finale -Allegro energico 

II 

El Poema de una Sanluquena 

Joaquin Turina 

1. Before the Mirror 

2. Song of the Dimple 

3. Hallucinations 

4. The Rosary in the Church 

III 
Prelude (Wind in the Pines) Spalding 
Study in Arpeggios (Dragon-Fly) " 
Piece en forme de habanera Ravel 

Tarentelle Szymanowski 



RING COMMITTEE 
EXAMINES BIDS 



Analysis of Courses 
For A.B. Degree Made 



CONCERT ARTIST 




ALBERT SPALDING 



The ring committee has finally re- 
ceived its bids for designs for a college 
ring and is now considering the factors 
which will eventually decide the 
standard. 

A number of firms have submitted 
their designs and no partiality is 
being shown. From these designs, all 
of which are excellent, will be chosen 
two for the final vote. 

There will probably be a synthetic 

ruby in the make-up with a gold 

Continued on Page 4 



Drs. Chamberlain 

And Lindsey Are 

Honored by Club 

Professor-Emeritus Joseph B. Lind- 
sey and Professor Joseph S. Chamber- 
lain, both connected with the depart- 
ment of chemistry for many years, 
were honored in a unique ceremony 
last Tuesday by the Chemistry Club. 
Two trees, to be known respectively 
as "The Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey Tree," 
and "The Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain 
Tree," situated in front of Goessmann 
laboratory, were dedicated to the two 
men. 

The outdoor program was opened 
by Dr. Baker with a brief acknowledge- 
ment to their services to the college 
and to the science of chemistry. Dr. 
Philip Smith reviewed the life and 
accomplishments of Dr. Lindsey, while 
Dean Machmer told something of Dr. 
Chamberlain's work. Other speakers 
on the program included Professor 
Ritchie, Anthony Ferrucci, president 

I of the club. Dr. Lindsey, and Dr. 

I Chamberlain. 

Continued on Page 6 



Freshmen and Sophomore Co-eds Begin Posture 

Classes to Develop Charm, Poise and Dignity 



t in t), 
iv. ba* 

vvip 
inc., , 
I 

i boo 
I tr 

ii*'ni » 



The cry of "Hold that line," hither- 
to heard only on the football field, has 
been taken over by the Women's Phy- 
sical Education Department. Co-eds 
of all sizes and styles are being vigor- 
ously exhorted by their physi-ed in- 
structress to "maintain those linea- 
ments," and the co-eds are doing their 
best to cooperate. 

Posture classes for women have 
been organized for the benefit of 

' those "sisters under the skin" whose 
contours and whose figures do not 
conform to those of Miss America. 

' Attendance for the freshmen co-eds is 
compulsory, the idea being to get 
them while they're young; but upper- 

1 classwomen have their choice and 
time enough to secure other peoples' 
opinions. About fifty women have 
enrolled from the classes of '39 and 
'40. 

With the theme that "a good car- 
riage is necessary for the desired ef- 



fect of clothes and grooming," the 
class is striving for the poise and bear- 
ing that make a good impression. The 
purpose of the class exercises is to 
create a figure that will satisfy even 
a statistician. 

The Camera Never lie* 

At the beginning of the year, photo- 
graphs are taken of each girl's natural 
posture; these photos are studied and 
discussed with the individual girl to 
aid in seeing the faults, the assets, and 
liabilities of each co-ed. 

The photographs of each girl are 
taken at the end of the course again 
for the purpose of demonstrating to 
the co-eds that sometimes the effort is 
not totally wasted. The work follows 
up the report of the results of the pro- 
gress. 

The excercises themselves are very 

simple: setting-up exercises, strength- 

1 ening the back muscles, pulling in the 

muscles of the abdomen, walking, etc. 



The principle behind the exercises is 
that the body is most efficient when 
the muscles are smooth and flat, and 
when the body is balanced. Govern- 
mentally speaking, the budget, also, 
can be satisfactory when the figures 
are perfectly balanced. 

Thr-y Like It 

As for the individuals most directly 
concerned, the co-eds seem to enjoy 
the classes immensely. They willingly 
confess that they are interested in 
making a good impression but are not 
so willing to give information as to 
whom they are trying to make the im- 
pression upon. 

The attitude of the male students on 
campus is, frankly, that some of the 
co-eds are in dire need of such a course. 
But some of the girls strongly advo- 
cate the course for men students too, 
probably after having watched the 
track men and cross-country men with 
Continued on Page 6 



Survey Lists Courses in 
Colleges Granting the 
A. B. Degree; M. S. C. 
Lacks Latin and Greek 



A report has been made public by 
the committee for the A.B. degree on 
an analysis conducted last spring of 
the curricula of one hundred colleges 
granting the A.B. degree. The report 
compares subject by subject the 
courses of study offered by M.S.C. 
with those offered by the colleges 
granting the arts degree. 

CourweN Lucking 
The survey report includes the 
following list of every subject included 
in the curricula of colleges granting 
the A.B. degree but omitted from the 
curriculum of M.S.C. Listed with the 
names of these courses are the number 
of colleges that teach the courses. 

Art. Formative art, 1 college; 
graphic and plastic arts, 1 college. 

Hi.story and Government. Con- 
temporary civilization, 2 colleges; 
citizenship, 1 college; occidental civi- 
lization, 1 college; ancient history, 1 
college; American institutions, 1 col- 
lege; political science, 3 colleges. 

Ancient Language*. Latin, 20 
colleges; Greek, 20 colleges. 

The report concludes as follows: 

Latin, Greek Not Needed 

"The outstanding courses that are 
lacking at Massachusetts State Col- 
lege are Latin and Greek. These 
courses, however, are not necessary 
for the A.B. degree. In numerous 
colleges mathematics may be elected 
in place of either Latin or Greek. 

Continued on Page 6 



ADELPHIA STARTS 
RED CROSS DRIVE 

The annual Red Cross driv , spon- 
sored on the campus this year by 
Adelphia and the Student Senate, got 
underway at the Adelphia convocation 
this morning, and will continue until 
Thanksgiving. 

Under the direction of David P. 
RotMitM '37, president of Adelphia 
and chairman of the drive, students 
and groups on the campus will be 
contacted and pledges secured. All 
pledges will be followed up before 
Thanksgiving. 

The convocation this morning, 
Continued on Page 6 

Annual Extension 
Conference Here 

State and county extension workers 
will meet at the college next Monday 
and Tuesday, November 23 and 24, 
for their annual conference, Director 
Willard A. Munson announced this 
week. The program will he devoted 
mainly to a discussion of problems 
with very little time given over to 
formal talks. 

The theme of the conference will be 
"(Irowing with our jobs," and will be 
opened Monday morning by President 
Hugh P. Maker with an address of 
welcome. The only formal address 
and the keynote of the conference will 
be delivered by A. B. Graham, in 
charge of extension specialists for the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture. 



© »936. UCOtTT a MTMS TO»ACCO CO. 



*»* 




TUB MASSACHlBgTre COIXEU.AN. TH.BSnAY. NOVEMBKB ,«,. 1W. 



TBS MASSACHUSETTS COLLECilAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 193« 



Collegian 



/Ifoaeeacbuse 

7T , ~ r^Tthe M— hu*tt. State < oik. PaWI** every Thursday by the tadwti. 
Official newspa per of t he M awacnuiru __ 

ifMTTS A BRKAUI.T '37. Editor-in-chi" I . 

1,11 ' A ' r . , utai Til* KURALNICK '37. Associate Editor 

FREDERICK I.1NUSTROM "My M..n., B ,n B Editor WAL1 




Campui 
PH11 IP B. BHIFF "37, Ediun 
RICHARD C. DESMOND W 
JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER "38 
MAURICE TONKIN "88 
MARY T. Ml- 1- HAN '39 
EMERY MOORE "39 
ELFANOR WARD '39 
THOMAS J. ENRH.HT '39 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 

Jll [AN H. KAT/EKE "38, Editor 
MAXWELL I KLAYMAN *as 
ALFRED M 8W1REN "88 
Make-up Editor 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37 

Stockbrldfte Correspondents 
RALPH HARRIS S37 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE BW 

liii.nii-i.il Adviser 
PROF LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



Bl SI NESS BOARD 
KENWOOD ROSS '..7. Business Maa*»e* 

CUFFO.D I iW«gga*fSS» * SSZS " 

„w» " " '"«U4A« B. »*«««• •" 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM 88 DONALD L. SILVERMAN "38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAMh 3* ^ZT~ 

-^B'RC^ipT^sTil^ER YEAIL_WNGL£COWESJ0JENT h 



Cireulntion Mfir. 



sir rr^:^.™r,:*r 

ration* or notut^ uui i j . ... 

,... 1 ^2l^ii^!^^l^ 

Entered Z ^.md-.U-s ^ " <>>" *»*"* 

anthe med August 20. 101*- 

Printed by The Kin B sb»ry Pre,, ffl North toe*. 
Northampton. M« Telephone 5..4. 



1936 Member 1°37 

Plssocided Colle6iate Press 

Distributors of 

G bfle6iaiB Digest 

WMMII r7« NAT.OHAU ADV-T.^NO .V 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Collet* Publishers Representative 

P. rTLAND • SEATTLE 



RKINAKRD 

Do your troubles weigh you down? 
Does all the world seem drab and flat 
and drearv and hopeless? Then you 
need either a course in orientation or, 
what amounts to the same thing, the 
spiritual comfort of confiding your 
troubles in Reinaerd. If misery loves 
company, then why not let us bring 
to your door the profound sympathies 
of eighteen hundred paid Collegian 
subscribers. 

Don't turn to Dorothy Dix — go to 

Reinaerd. . . „ 

Before our typewriter breaks into 
tears and gets all rusty and useless, 
lets get to the crux of the matter. 
This very week we saw a normally 
cheerful personality inching along the 
topography with his face on the 
ground, his shoulders up around his 
ears, and his heart in his shoes. From 
this abject apparition we pried a 
story, and present it to you through 
courtesy of the management of the 
Doldrums of Despair. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday, Nov. 19 

7:30 p.m. Band, M Building 
8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stockbridge 

Friday, Nov. 20 

8:00 p.m Stockbridge Reception 

Drill Hall 
Saturday, Nov. 21 

2:00 p.m. Tufts at Medford 

Faculty Party 

8:00 p.m. Vic parties 

Alpha Sigma Phi 
Alpha Gamma Rho 
Abbey 
Sunday, Nov. 22 

5:00 p.m. Vespers, Mem. Hall, 
Rabbi A. J. Feldman 
Monday, Nov. 23 
Extension Conference 
8:00 p.m. Community Concert, 
Spaulding 

Tunedsr ^ ov ' 24 

Extension Conference 

8:00 p.m. Informal, Drill Hall 
Wednesday, Nov. 2."i 

Thanksgiving recess, classes end 
at noon 
Monday. Nov. 30 

Smith College Concert 

4:00 p.m. Basketball Clinic 
Tuesday, Dec- 1 

Patterson Players 



Stockbridqe 



EDITORIAL 



•*ZUM TACiE" . f .u granting of an 

Last year we carried on a campag n for t W » J^ 
A.B. degree by the college We * rote em ^ Alumm 

student petition ^^f^ge paper urging that State 
wrote vigorous letters *° a ^J}®^ stuSent opinion favored the 
grant the Arts degree. ^{g/^Sn. The administration, 
''A.B. degree campaign of the to ?T^dy to give the degree 
however, said ttot th« icoUege waanot ™W * but { a few 
of Bachelor of Arts. There wae some g . B deg ree became 

weeks even that quieted down, and J*»» ^ e± Those 

Mother for^tten .ethtond ^^4^^ decree may feel 
really interested in Je 'njr d^tion o' be na&y t0 

that we are nearer to the time wnenj* nearer m 

grant an A.B. We are nearer m tm*. ™2w to give us a 
fact. We have not vet taken th steps n 

^V^^^^^^-^"^ can we ask for 

the ^^^rceiitage of ^^erjraduates ^^joring m^he 

fields of the Arts. T^^uP^Veducation who will be 
in English, modern languages ^ h'story . dence deg ree, whereas, 
graduated from State with a Bachelor 01 a ^ ^ 

ff they followed an ^^£^»SwSd upon ^ea- These 
thev would have the Arts aegree « rfeeree Some of them 

P^ple have the right to ffor»n^^ did ^ coUege 
Ue\ that a B.Sc. is a misnomer for the worn y „ cov 

Thev have the right to expect an A,B. *P«^ ^ d 
ered the law" ^bey do not^owever, ££**£*»* a f jLg 
As a student of the h uma " 1 "^' ^ aken enough courses to be 
can be eecuaed fj^^L^J^^t^ many to deserve 
a Bachelor of Arts, by t he has a so ^k ^ . g everyone else 

that degree. The English ma J^ S /^ x U cour ^es a semester. Per- 
at the college, to carry »" Xmo% while h Twas searching for a 
haps as a freshman and sophomore, waue m^ ^^ 

field of study that interested h im, ^ ™ many objects in 
justified. It gave hiir i an JJ™^^ his major to the one 
perspective, enabling him Perhaps, to n hag ^^ ms 

Lid which most appealed to him. go . 

rraior. he should be allowed « ^fWenttation. Instead, the 

£Stt ^iTSaS^fttt which may be the 

beginning of h,s f llf ^'" rl ' eauirem ents of the college, a man may 
According to the ^ cn, l r ?™f"„ aces and Literature and take 
major in the department of \;^% e *J™ eni . The other three 
onl v two courses a semester in taB a«PJ™ f ultry to ser- 

or U course, he «^ ft ?^^SninS <>ut men who have a 
ology 1 erhaj s. l " \f^*^^Uah f however, is the production 
hroad education. All v^e accomplish. |f co n ege 19 merely 

S^p, «f •" W4*S* "ff r^orv ~f dS study of 
secondary to reM educa on_ the t «^ b(jen cons , dere d as 
our college is sound, t ollej?es n ave. n gs the who , e 

t C " 2 +£5* "S; »ne by ^ &. in very recent years, 
theory of educatioii 1^,.^ - of B college. 

doe. not adhare to Je— ^ hngrf the ^^^ 

considered a "^iSXS'o? four of his five or six courses in 
quires a student toe a iry^ three or 1 . g bein ^ r m{1 , e at 

LanguMges and J r | t f at Xnt taking three English courses, how- 
thoroughness. 1 l £ l Xr courses in order to get enough 
ever, still has to WMtM>S0WHr |oo| . t h rough a 
credits to Bnduim e fWU » is t suit able times and 

detrimental. continued on Page A 



Dear Tools, ,»„»« _— — 

You will probably W very much 
surprised at reieivinc HA l«-"« r ' 
I'm kind of surprised at myself as 
I sit here writinc it- *•■ tJ,u 
probabb chalk up this letter to 
„„ aversion for myster.es. The 
.uvsterv I refer to i* *he break in 
what I hoped would be a very 
promising friendship. 

To help voti remember and to 
bo utterly frank, lot mo review a 
little bit. I know you for almost 
„ vear. I *»>♦ you »* rather far 
between yet regular intervals 
(about every time I came homo). 
I oorrosponded with you regularly. 

Now, 1 »hmh I »■" ■ • m " tl> '"" 
judue of character. 1 wanted our 
friendship to continue because 1 
thouiiht that you wore an mtolli- 
uont, considerate, and dos.rable 

voiinii la«ly. 

For mvself, I am a l.tllo disap- 
pointed with the impression I 
must liavo made upon you. I 
bavon't boon » very warm lover, 
I know, but for one th.mi, I 
seemed to ** «tuck in an .ntol- 
loctual rut which you wouldn t 
bolp me «»»t »f, »ud f«r another 
thinii I did not want to involvo 
mvself or anyone else in a situa- 
tion for which I was not yet pro- 
pared financially, socially, or 
otherwise. 

By this time you are probably 
womlermii what the purpose of 
,bis letter is. If yon will refer to 
the ■lljlllBlf-l aAain, you will find 
out that I want to clear up a 
mvstory... THIS mystery. 

Whv, after n very pleasant date 
(I thought so) and, in fact, a very 
ploasant friendship, did you ignore 
,w« of my letters? The only 
possible oxplanations I «»« think 
of are those 



Announcements 



NO COLLECilAN NEXT WEEK 

Because of the Thanksgiving 
holidays, publication of the Colle- 
gian will be omitted next week. It 
will be resumed on Thursday, 
Dec. 3, with the tenth issue. 



Kusiness Board Mooting 

There will be a meeting of the Busi- 
ness Board of the Collegian in the Col- 
legian office at 4:30 this afternoon for 
the purpose of electing sophomores to 
the board. The attendance of all mem- 
bers is required. 



New Hort Club 
Elects Officers 



Officers elected last Thursday by 
the newly organized Stockbridge Hor- 
ticulture Club are: president, Dew. 
hirst Wade; vice-president, B. Bush, 
recording secretary, Pauline Whitman, 
and treasurer, R. McDonough. The I 
following freshmen were elected to the 
executive committee: R. Heitmun, 
S. DeBonis, and I. Jenkins. 

Meetings of the club are to be held 
every Thursday evening at 7:30 p.m. 
at Wilder Hall. 

A most interesting program is being I 
arranged by Dr. Waugh, who will 
give a talk using lantern slides on this! 
coming Thursday, Nov. 19, at 7:30. 

The purpose of the new organizal 
tion as set forth in its constitution i? | 

as follows: 

(1) To bring together fellow siud- 
ents interested in horticulture for the 
sake of fellowship. 

(2) The mutual improvement and 
benefit of its members by disseminat 
ing among them a technical knowledge 
of the natural sciences. 

(3) Discussion and the debating of I 
the most practical methods in the| 
carrying out of horticultural principle 

(4) To emulate everything pertain 

ing to same. 

(5) To encourage the most prac- 
tical methods of raising and maintain 
ing higher standards of excellence inl 
the arts pertaining to all branches 
horticulture. 

(6) To create public interest l 
the same and the recognition of iul 
beauties and importance disseminating! 
useful information, by reading andl 
discussing essays, and by encouraging 
exhibitions pertaining to horticulture 



Fornald Club Meeting 

The Fernald Entomology club, meet- 
ing on Thursday, November 19. at 
7-30 will have ns its speaker, F. J. 
Spruijt who will discuss "Bulb Insect 
Investigations at a U.S. Feed Labor- 
Mr. Spruijt got his elementary 
training in entomology in Holland. 
He took his master's degree in Berke- 
ley, California. During 1929 he worked 
in the bulb laboratory in the state of 
Washington. Since then and until very 
recently he worked at the bulb labo- 
ratory at Babylon, Long Island. 
From that position he resigned to 
come here to work for his doctor's 
degree. 



Short Course Kegist ration 

The nine-weeks course in Poultryl 
Husbandry opens this week with a to- 
tal registration of eighteen studend 
This is the largest group in Mttrfl 
years. 



Alumni Notes 

Frank Bishop and James Pattonl 
S'36 visited the short course ofBce thtl 
week. Bishop, who is working on hi- 1 
home farm in Springfield, Vermon: 
was on his way to Florida. 

The Alumni Association plans a hiil 
reunion Saturday, Nov. 21, after thtl 
M.S.C. -Tufts game. This reunion will 
take place at Carey Memorial Hall al 
I.exington, Mass. The banquet will 
start at seven. Milton C. Allen WW 
is the chairman of the occasion, and tx 
announces that about two hundr«| 
alumni are expected. 



(1) You got married. 
•>» You've got yourself ii steady 

hoy friend, 

(3) You were very much ol- 

f,nded nt something I did 

lor didn't clo^. 

Frankly, this is what I Mould 

like to hear from you. II l»«Hs 

,1, or (2) of the above promise are 

,orro««, phase write and toll me 

,„„! Ml be the first to co.igralu- 

Uto vo„. If (3) is '" rr i 7 , - M , 

the firs! lo kick myself. Hut at 
Iinv rale. 1 think that 1 deserve »n 

im swer from you thai will clear 
up Ibis myslery. 

Sincerely, 

(iadoopus 

If the Knglish department con- 
demns this letter as a piece of sloppy, 
sentimental slush replete with bom 
bastic jargon, we can at least res 
assured that the Grounds department 
would commend it for its open aver- 
sion to loitering on the premises. 



, ,„. irony of it »"- • freshman 
rocenlly departed from our ...ids 

,,v requosl. I he o-.ly ^ 

«.v,. r bought was enl.Hed: KOH 
TO STl l>Y. 



Babbi Feldman at Vespers 

One of the most prominent rabbis 
in New England, Rabbi Abraham J. 
Feldman of Hartford will speak at the 
Vespers Service next Sunday after- 
noon in the Memorial Building on the 
topic, "It is Religion that Challenges." 
Rabbi Feldman is well known both 
for his remarkable speaking ability, 
and for his intellectual insight. 



Band Behearsal 

The last music rehearsal before the 
Tufts p« me will be held tonight, 
Thursday, at 8 p.m. in the Memorial 
Building. Notice that from now on. 
while rehearsals will not start until 
8:00, they will start promptly «' 8:00. 
So .-very man will he expected to to 

ready to play 00 lime. All men not 
attending the rehearsal will not he 

considered for the Tufts trip. There 

will b« ;< drill rehearsal Friday at 4:80. 

The place will he announced at re 

hearsal tonight. 



Fall Sports Close 

The Stockbridge fall sports teamsenl 
their season this week. The foot In 
team closes their season with t« 
games. The second team playj 
South Hadley High on Wednrsd I 
and the varsity meeting Cushin( 
Academy at M.S.C. on Friday Ma«| 
of Coach Ball's regulars will bell 
able to play in this game due U> injij 
ries received in the Deerfield gaiwl 
Baldwin. Hair, Lyons, and HelandJ 
are the injured men. The cross-< wiinirj 
team also winds up its season Knd* 
with 8 meet with dishing. The ■ 
still undefeated. 



|»re-Mod Club 

There will he ■ meeting of the pre 
med club tonight at 7 p.m. at Kernald 
Hall. There will he a discussion of sex 
education led by 8 prominent < lergv 
man of Amherst 

Dancing Cbisses 

All those interested ID obtaining 
tickets for social dancing (lasses please 
si^n and pay at the treasurers office 
Unless enOUgh people sign for these 
lessons it will be impossible lo give 



Kolonv Klub 

K.K. announces that they have i 
eeptod several new pledges an<l ' 
initiation will lake place thi~ *■■ 

Fi-oshmaii News 

The student council announi m 
the Kreshman Reception will <n 
place Friday, Nov. JO, at the 1»1 
Hall at 8::i0 p.m. The Hat RoA < | 
take place Monday. Nov. 88, »*J 
soccer field. All students are feqU* 
to to present at 4:30 in old dotf 



thOTO Ihis year. 



Nov Oul-Palieiil Hours 

The Student Health Sen 
ii. .unc.s that the new Infirma' 
ing is now in use. and thai I 
bed patients onlv. Out pah' 
< 'nnlinueil >>' 




SPORTS 



'-m 




B00TERS COMPLETE SEASON 

BUT BOW TO WESLEYAN 



\ spirited but unlucky State soccer 

,, in closed the season's campaign 

Friday afternoon at Alumni 

- , ,r Field by bowing to the Wes- 

n hooters, 1-0. It was an iron 
nl hi team that tried to wrest a State 
victory from the Cardinals, for every 
man played the whole game, but to 

vail for Dame Fortune was not 
with them. 
Wcshyan lost no time in forging 

<l as Hood managed to score in 
a,, opening seconds of play. The 
State team then got set and out- 

, .1 Wesley an completely for the 

,,( the half. Tired but still aggres- 
(jjve in the second half, State was 
,ai ranxious and could not match 
\\ . -| ( van's smart defensive play to 
score the tying goal. 
The summary: 



Mass. Stale 






Wosleyan 


Turner 


g 




(Jar her 


.lak 


rf 




Dresser 


Conway 


If 




Ackart 


K< rim dv 


rh 




Blackman 


i a per 


ch 




Walsh 


Buzzee 


Ih 




Smith 


Cain 


ro 




Dowds 


|.\ man 


ri 




Hood 


Rodda 


cf 


Ha 


mmerstrom 


l 


Ii 




White 


Lyle 


lo 




Clark 



SOPHOMORES DEFEAT 

1 KKS1IM AN BOOTKBS 3-0 

The class of 1940 fell before 
their Sophomore opponents on 
the soccer field yesterday after- 
noon, 3 to 0. Kalo booted in 
the first goal for the sophomore 
shinkickers and Roberts kicked 
the next two goals. 



Statesmen Overcome Rensselaer Tech 

40-0 in Week-end Aerial Scoring Spree 



Smashing through for a 40-0 win 
over their Trojan rivals last Saturday 
afternoon, the Statesmen made one of 
their most spectacular showings of the 
season away from home when they 
chalked up six legal touchdowns. The 
second win of the season found the 
Carawaymen showing well against 
their Engineer opponents. 

Outstanding scorer of the game was 
James "Brick" Savage who scored 



twice for the Maroon and White dur- 
ing the last part of the final quarter. 
Four other touchdowns were scored 
during the game by Putnam, Steffi 
Czelusniak, and Towle. 

State shed first blood in the game 
before the first quarter had progressed 
four minutes. Ed Czelusniak playing 
halfback, received the ball from ('apt. 
Rossiter at center, faked a spin and 
made off for a sixty-yard run before 



ecti s 

Paul 

pass 



OUTSTANDING SENIOR GRIDMEN 



Thl past season was more success- 
ful than the record of five victories 
and three defeats would indicate. In 
(act the soccermen have the best 
record of all State current fall sport 
teams. 

Coach Briggs demonstrated the 
utility of his new system of offense 
and defense when State trounched 
Worcester Tech 7-4 in the opening 
game at Worcester. The new sopho- 
more members were outstanding, scor- 
ing five of the seven goals. Rodda 
tinted for three, and Lyman and 
Podolak one each, while veteran 
lOselj scored the remaining two. 

late continued its road trip by 
I defeating Connecticut State 2-1, Ly- 
man and Rodda accounting for the 
[goals. The next Saturday at Williams- 
Itown, State was outfought by an 
aggressive Williams team, and lost 3-0. 
Playing its opening game at home, 
I Siaii lost a close one to the Inter- 
[collegiate Champions, Yale, 2-0. State 
Ithen - -tarted a new winning streak by 
P»tittg Tufts at Medford, 2-1. 

The twin eon came to a climax when 
|th( Statesmen completely outplayed 
|.\n In rst to win by the score of 2-0. 
Rodda and Osley accounted for the 
teals. State next defeated Trinity at 
Hart lord, 2-0, with Rodda and Osely 
f'gain scoring the goals. 

The season came to an unceremoni- 
ous close when a superior State team 
IU nipped 1-0 by the Little Three 
mampiona from Wesleyan. Inability 
italize on the many scoring 
PI H n-i unities accounted for the State 
lefeat. 



larriers Lose 
To Rensselaer 



uuh the State cross-country 
defeated 88-89 last Saturday 

i . they finished their season 

even break of throe wins and 

Be, State teams have had an 

ik or better every year ex- 

' *t since 1922 when cross- 
was inaugurated at Bay 



nth 

liiii 



ice at Troy was very similar 
ir's when tin* Techmen won 

lilchcox of H.P.I, took the 
very start and held a wide 
iroughoat. Piekard and In- 
state were tied for second 
I Tech took the next five 

I it lie and NeJnme of State 
><>r ninth place. 



OB 



I'M-ll 



Mosb 



Lapbaiu 



Filipkowslti 




[ iricius 



Fislu 



he was driven offside deep in 

territory. On the next play, 
Cut nam pulled down a 40-yard 
from Towle and stepped across the 
goal line. The attempt to convert al 
this point failed. 

Shortly after this, Niden made a 
spectacular one hand "Kelley" catch 
of the hall to cross the line once more. 
This score failed to register because of 
an offside on the State team. In the 
second period another pass accounted 
for a State score. Zela/.o hurled an 
end over end pass to Steff in the end 
zone where he received it between two 
of the Engineers. Linden kicked the 
point after, making the score 1U-0 
when the half ended. 

POUT more scores in the second half 
ran the points up to forty. The men 
of Troy entered the norond half with 

a brisk hut temporary defense accom- 
panied by a pass offense. Stale took 

the ball In the third quarter when 

Brown intercepted a pass on their 'Jo- 
yard line. A touchdown resulted on 
a short pass from Towle to Ed Cze- 
lusniak, when Czeiusniak ran through 
the entire Tech team to score, hud 
Fisher kicked the extra point. Again 
in this quartet the Maroon and White 
scored after Niden recovered a Rensse- 
laer fumble on their 40-yard stripe 
and carried it i<> the fifteen. Towle 

carried the hall around right end to 
make the fourth State touchdown. 

In the last period State took the 

ball on the RIM. lo, and carried up 

the field until Savage took it around 
right end for a touchdown. Linden 
converted. Shortly alter, Savage took 
the ball again and scored for the last 
time in the game. 



Berilsli-in 



Bossitcr 



The summary: 

Mass. State 

Lapham, le 
Fisher, It 
Sievers, Ig 
Rossiter, c 
Hernstem, rg 
( hray, rt 

Putnam, re 
Towle, qb 
Brown, Ihb 
Czelusniak, rhb 
Niden, fb 



B.P.I. 

re, Waycie 
rt, Warwick 
rg, Kingsley 

i , Baumann 

Ig, Richardson 

It, Auditors 

le. Bahr 

<)b, Wheelahan 

rhb, 1'nger 

lhb. Ward 

fb, Conrad 



GRIDMEN TO MEET TUFTS SAT. 
IN 50TH TRADITIONAL GAME 



Traveling to Tufts next Saturday 
the Statesmen will engage in the 
fiftieth traditional tilt against their 
traditional Jumbo rivals. Although 
both teams have had mediocre records 
so far this season, this week-end game 
ought to provide the fans with plenty 
of enjoyment. 

So far this season the Statesmen 
have won but two games. They beat 
Rhode Island State 13 to 8 and last 
Saturday swamped Rensselaer 40-0. 
They will no doubt enter the Tufts 
game with a new backfield setup 
which proved its worth against R.P.I. 
Towle will do the qunrterbacking 
while Czelusniak will fill in at Dick's 
former halfback post . 

The Maroon and White will he 
faced with a handicap, inasmuch as 
two guards will probably be missing, 
Al (iricius, who hns been suffering 
from an infected finger and Ed Bern- 
stein, first stringer, who has been laid 
up with an infected toe, will not he 
ready to see service on Saturday. 

Besides these two men. seven other 
gridmen will play their last game for 
State. They are Moseley and Lap- 
ham, ends; O'Brien ami Cray, tackles; 
Fisher, guard; Filipkowski, halfback; 
and Capt. Dave Rossiter, pivot man 

Last year was the first in ten that 
the Statesmen took the Jumbos into 
Camp. Tiki score Of the game that 
was played on Alumni Field during 



extremely cold weather, was 19 to 13- 
During the past ten years. State has 
won one, tied twice and has been on 
the short end of the score seven times. 
The State-Tufts series began in 1886 
when M.S.C. won 6-o. After that the 
two teams did not meet again until 
1901. Since then, except for the war 
years, 1917-1918, the teams have 
played each other continually. At 
present Tufts stands victor in seven- 
teen of the thirty-three clashes in 
which the elevens have engaged. 
M.S.C. has won eleven times and five 
ties have been recorded. 

The Tufts record of wins this fall 
seems to be no better than State's. 
The -Jumbos have won two games, 
tied one and lost three. They de- 
feated Colby and last week subdued 
Adam Walsh's Polar Bears. Their 
game with New Hampshire ended in 
a 0-0 deadlock, and they lost to 
Williams, Rhode Island and Brown. 
Yet in spite of these defeats the 
Medfordites have shown some power, ! 
and will give the Statesmen serious 
opposition. 

Outstanding for the Tufts team is 
Boger Keith, backfield man who has 
carried Few Manley's eleven along by 
virtue of his power as I ball carrier 
and extraordinary punting. Ace 
Acorra, pivot man is the man who will 
oppose Captain Rossiter on Saturday. 





W*. FOSTER POKE 

OF KEYNON OOLLrXbe 
is fME ONLY COLLEGE 
rRES'lDENl WHO FLIES HIS 

OWN PLANE ' 






A UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR FROM Aui 
IK'AVLLED I?. ,000 MILES TO ATTEND 

IRE UNIVERSITIES C0NG&ES3 AT 
LONDON. ONLY TO FIND THAI Hi HM A 
YEAR AHEAD OF TIME ' 
•^THE MISUNDERSTANDING WAf CAUSED 

BY A TYPt S r f ERROR ' , 






N H Am. 




A. T. Wilson W. E. I^indergan 

THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Telephone 654 Northampton, Mi 



jvs oaoiw irrN 



THE 



MASSACHUSETTS COIXBGIAN. THUBSDAY. NQVBMBKB ■», .936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 1936 



Wolff 'Prefers Singing to 
Talking' During Stay Here 



fraternities 



Demonstrates Beautiful 
Voice During Concert 



Playing before an appreciative and 
enthuaiaatic audience in Bowker Au- 
ditorium last Monday evening Brnat 
Wolff, young ainger of (Jerman lieder. 
demonstrated both a beautiful bari- 

Ume voice and excellent knowledge of 
musicianship. 

Arriving on campus Monday morn- 
ing Mr. Wolff made his first appear- 
and before the students of M.S.C. 
lt the music class on Monday fore- 
noon, introduced by Mr. Eric Clarke, 

director of the Concert Project of the 

Carnegie Corporation under whose 
auapicw Mr. Wolff visited Massachu- 
s ,Hs State College, Mr. Wolff ap- 
peared wry nervous and self-conscious. 
•Til Bather Sinii" 
'The only time I am ever nervous 
is when I have to speak," he explamed. 
"1 would much rather sing or play at 

the piano." 

Hut his Bby and embarrassed man- 
ner only served to enhance Ids charm. 
Speaking in an engaging Cerman 
accent, he discussed the s.ngmg of 
lu-J t -r and the term "musical nation 
as applied to C.ermany. 

-The German people know so much 

Of music because the music of the 
known composers is taken into the 
homes and learned by ear as part of 
the everyday life," he went on to say. 
An Authority 
Having made an intensive study of 
German lieder, Mr. Wolff is an au- 
thority on the sublet. He explained 
the intricacies of heder-singing and 
the difleni.es between it and opera- 
singing "In theii ampacity bea their 
difficulty," be said. "You cant act 
with lieder as you can with opera sing- 
ing You simply sing what you ieel 
in your heart without the dramatics. 

To illustrate his point, he then pro- 
ce eded to sing one of his iamihar 
M.ngs When he tmished. he asked 
whether the class wanted to hear 
another one. the answer in the 
affirmative indicated the interest in 
the lieder. Mr. Wolff obliged with 
another song and was then influenced 
|0 continue to sing to present al- 
most an informal concert. 

M lunch, he was entertained at the 
tacultv club and was introduced tO 
the members of the college faculty. 
Several of the professors displayed 
evident interest in Mr. Wolff's work, 
and he was obliged to accommodate 
with several selections. 

Kvritirttt Concert 
At the concert in the evening, Mr. 
Wolff's beautiful baritone voice and 
musical technique wire very much in 
evidence. Singing in both Italian and 
German, he portrayed a great knowl- 
edge of the folk songs of Italy and 



SIIK WAS A l,ADY 

A new "first" was established on 
the campus last week when, for 
the first time, someone apologized 
to the Grounds department for 
digging up its newly graded road- 
sides. And it was a woman at 
that. 

The apology came in a letter to 
the Superintendent of Grounds in 
which the woman states that she 
had accidently driven over the 
lawn during the Hort Show, she 
was sorry, and if a bill were sent 
her, she would gladly pay it. 

Not only did the surprised 
(3 rounds department take steps to 
preserve the letter for posterity, 
but thev replied that in view of 
the apology she not only needn't 
pay, but that they would be 
pleased to have her come back and 
try her luck again. 



The Massachusetts State College 
Interfraternity Council adopted a new 
constitution at a meeting last Tues- 
day night held at Lambda Chi Alpha. 
The past officers, Kenwood Ross, 
president; Raymond Wyman, vice- 
president; Robert Buzzee, secretary, 
were re-elected and Donald Silverman 
was elected to the new office of 

treasurer. 

The Massachusetts State College 
Interfraternity Council voted to send 
Philip Layton as a representative of 
the College to the Interfraternity 
Conference to be held in New York 
over the Thanksgiving holidays. 

The Council also expressed its 
desire to help the Carnival Committee 
in the preparation and promotion of 
its program. 



Record Club Has 
Fourteen Albums 




Germany. Most of the songs are of 
nineteenth century origin and, as pre- 
sented by Mr. Wolff, illustrate the 
influence of the poets and musicians 
upon the sentiments of the people. 

Emotion and pathos were admirably 
portrayed in Mr. Wolff's renditions^ 
His feeling and his communion with 
the feeling of the composers were evi- 
dent as he sang. No other type of 
singing demands such interpretive 
ability. Tuneful and human in lyric 
emotion, German lieder represent the 
true meeting of melody and words. 
Mr Wolff's voice presents great 
ability for portraying this emotion 

and feeling. 

Backstage 
Following the concert, several visit- 
ors backstage commented on the 
unusualness of the presentation of the 
Arioso, a recently-discovered work by 
Handel. Mr. Wolff confided that he 
was making recordings for the Colum- 
bia Corporation and was arranging for 
radio programs to begin this spring. 
At the Tuesday Fine Arts Concert. 
Mr Wolff explained the composition 
of Mueller's song cycle, Die Schone 
Mullein. Displaying wide knowledge 
of the history of music and intimate 
knowledge of lieder and the background 
ot lieder, he illustrated his informal 
and all too short discussion with selec- 
tions by Muller. 

Flaying his own accompaniment on 
the piano, Mr. Wolff demonstrated 
ability as a pianist. Self-accompani- 
ment is a very infrequent occurence 
in formal concerts, but it added to 
Mr Wolff's concert the informality 
and intimacy which are the keynote 
of such a program and which make 
the program a unified affair. 



FriittTttiriew Initiate 

Three fraternities have recently 
initiated new members. The new 
members are as follows: 

Theta Chi Robert Packard, Ev- 
erett Kldridge, John Parker, and 
j William Howe. 

Phi Sigma Kappa Paul and 
Frank Fanning, Robert J. Murphy, 
Gardner Anderson, Clifford Lippin- 
cott, William Harrison. 

Lambda Chi Alpha Franklin 
Southwick, Donald Cowles, Charles 
Rodda, George Haylon, Robert Mul- 
ler, James King, Francis Warren, 
Richard Lee. 



With fourteen albums of recordings 
already purchased, the Record Club 
began its existence on Monday, Nov. 
16. A wide range in the choice of the 
records was made to satisfy the tastes 
of the members of the club. 

The collection includes instrumental 
and vocal music, orchestral, chorus, 
and solo. The orchestras represented 
are the New York Philharmonic, the 
Opera Orchestra, the Berlin Orchestra, 
and the orchestra of the Opera- 

Comique. 

Among the soloists are such well- 
known artists as Richard Tauber, 
tenor; Lily Pons, soprano; and Wil- 
liam Kempff, pianist. Of outstanding 
interest are the records made by the 
Vienna Choir Boys who appeared at 
the college last year and by the Don 
Cossacks, who are to appear at a 
Social Union program on Dec. 12. 

Works of the great composers are 
included. Compositions by Bach, 
Brahms, Beethoven, Mozart, Mendel- 
ssohn, Strauss, Schubert, and others 
have been recorded and added to the 
collection. 



Lambda lh-lta Mu 

Lambda Delta Mu announces a new 
pledge to the sorority, Betty Eaton t9 

On Monday evening, Nov. 16. a 
dinner was given at the sorority hous. 
for the sorority patronesses. Those 
attending were Mrs. Stewart, Mrs 
Van Rockel, Mrs. Helming, Mr- 
Caldwell, Mrs. Conner, and Mi 

Merriam. 

The rushing committee for this 
year consists of Marion Becher '-'iH, 
chairman; Dorothea Donnelly '37, 
Lillian Jackson "37, Elinor Brown 
Marjorie Harris *39, and Betty Ken- 
yon '39. 



MUS1CIAL CLUBS 
OFFER CONCERT 



CLASS RINCiS 

Continued from Page 1 
foundation. To make things easier 
for the fraternity man who wishes to 
buy a fraternity ring as well, it may 
be possible to have the Greek letters 
encrusted upon the stone at a nominal 
price. The name, class and other data 
about the buyer may also be inscribed 

in the ring. 

To eliminate purchases of a college 
ring by the customary few who come 
and go rapidly, these rings will not be 
available to a student until the second 
semester of his or her junior year 




The Combined Musical Clubs last 
Friday were the sponsors of an enter- 
tainment and vie party held in 
Memorial Hall auditorium. Proceeds 
from the presentation will be used to 

I defray expenses for the operetta. 

I Those taking part were: members 
of the string ensemble; a woman's trio 
consisting of Marjorie Cain, Muriel 
Cain and Phyllis Nelson; Leonard 
Levin, violin soloist; Harry Snyder, 
pianist; Barbara Keck, vocalist; the 
"Swingtette"; Robert Cain, novelty 

violinist. 

The Combined Musical Clubs are 
planning further entertainments of 
this sort. 



Alpha Lambda Mu 

The sorority welcomes Mrs. Claude 
Neat as its new patroness. 

Winifred Taylor '38 and Edith 
Whitmore '37 were in charge of I 
progressive tea held Sunday afternoon 

A formal dinner will be gi\<n , 
Thursday in honor of Mrs. Claude | 
Neet. Professor and Mrs. Neet, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sidney Kauffman will be 
guests. 

Sigma Beta Chi 

A Thanksgiving dinner will be held 
at the sorority house next Tuesday 
night for all the members of the 

sorority. 

A very fine alumnae bulletin was 
issued this week. The Sigma was! 
organized and planned by Lois Barnes. 



Shows daily 2:30 6:30 8:30 



YCMK FAVORITE TINES 

when you want them and as often as you want 
Them on the R.C.A. VICTOR RADIO 
RECORD PLAYER. It is portable and plays 
10 and 12-inch records, and when attached to 
any 60-cycle AC radio, reproduces the record- 
ing through the radio loudspeaker. Can be 
operated at any distance from the radio. 
Price $16.50 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

"-*?" E1CCtriCa, S " PP A^t, Mass. 

35 Pleasant Street ^ 



Fri.-Sat., Nov. 20-21 

Joan Blondell Dick Powell 

Warren William in 

"Stage Struck" 

— other feature — 

Robt. Young Florence Rice 

in 

"Sworn Enemy" 



Fit 



Sun.-Mon.-Tuw*.. Nov. 22-24 I 

The Big Broadcast 1 
of 1937" 

with Jack Benny 

Burns and Allen Martha Raye 

Benny Goodman Band 



EDITORIAL 

Continued from Page 2 

It is difficult for a man to do justice 
to his major when he has to do work 
in unrelated subjects. Thoroughness 
in the study of English literature, 
history, or economics demands more 
than class work. There is the neces- 
sity of almost as much outside reading, 
and often more, than the material 
covered in the textbook in one course. 
When a student is burdened by six 
courses, however, especially when they 
may not be in related fields, he does 
well to do all assignments without 
bothering about supplementary read- 
ing. And yet, herein he is neglecting 
the most important aspect of thorough 

earning. 

While enthusiasm ran high, last 
year, and the Collegian communica- 
tions column was being taxed to its 
limit by sympathizers with the paper's 
A.B. degree campaign, a member of 
the faculty wrote a letter which 



Sigma Iota 

Mrs. Cance and Mrs. Broughton 
poured for Sigma Iota's hot chocolate 
party held in the Abbey on Wediu-s- 
day afternoon, Novemlier 18. 

Ruth Blassberg is chairman of the | 
rushing committee. 



dampened the spirit of many. The 
man, stated that the Massachusetts 
State College was not in a position to 
grant an Arts degree. He suggested 
that the college concern itself with 
bettering what it already had, rat her | 
than expending energy towards ex- 
pansion. One thing well done is [.re- 
ferable to two which suffer irom 
mediocrity. If we strive for a thor- 
oughness in study in any field of 
interest, we will reach that time when 
the administration will have no reason 
to say that the time is not ripe for th* 
granting of the Bachelor of Aral 

deKree - -W.C.G. 



ICAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TO 
PRESENT CHRISTMAS PLAY 



u 




Wed.-Thur*., Nov. 2.>-2« 

Helen Hunt Jackson's 

RAMONA" 

with Loretta Young 
Filmed entirely in technicolor 

— 2nd big hit 

Charlie Ruggles Mary Boland 

in 

[Wives Never Know] 



Pipe Lovers | 

FOR TEN DAYS ONLY 

WE ARE OFFERING A 

«3.50 ROMANO He* 

for only 

98c 

All tobaccos, Cigars and Cigarette] 
at cut rate prices 

Wellworth Pharmacy! 

THE CUT RATE STORK 
We Deliver Phono ll8 



THANKSGIVING 
Greeting Cards 
Napkins Tallies 

Place Cards 



U. S. CAMERA, 1936 

$2.90 

Oxford Book of English 

Verse $1.49 



THE BIBLE, to be read as Living Literature $3.75 
Rhyming Dictionary $1.89 

JkMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



i ..in 



llig'" 



pus dramatic, musical and re- p.. "WjltoprkripO*" 

organizations will cooperate in 1 Hill T? dl/A I M It J; 



Stoddard Talks 
on Education in 
American Scene 



Th 



pro art* 



•♦nin f'hurju^pri«* i/*aj 



CAMPUS DANCE BAND IS 
COMPLETELY REORGANIZED 



Dean to Represent 



Golle6iate Di6est 

•NATIONAL COLLEGE NEWS IN PICTURE AND PARAGRAPH- 



Phil Burgun 'W, manager of the 

Statesmen, announces complete ra» 

i<« year of the local 

The Statesmen 

liligently since 

began and are 

l season, Their 

te season came 
I, when they 

Epailon The 
had filled an 
South Hadley 



|**ue H 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hljk llat a lM work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



WARM GLOVES 

The largest stock in town. All the way from a fur lined 
I a pair of ski mittens. We recommend Saranac 
Buckskfn for all wear. Our prices will interest you. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 



Clothes for College Men for forty-five yean 




College Candy Kitchen 



WHEN UP TOWN . . . 

Drop in for a snack or a full course dinner at Sarriss. 
A distinctive restaurant of unexcelled standards. 






He grades certified mtll( try its color 
-p^ • The new device which H. H. Tucker, pro 

Demonstration fessor of dairy husbandry at Rutgers Uni- 
versity, is demonstrating for the first time grades certified milk according to 
its color. He says that yellow is the most popular color this season. 

* Ai nil- 




.■^M 



r^y ■ 1 Ted Peck ham, 

ouiaer 22 . ye ar - ou 

manager of New York City's 
novel guide-escort service, says 
his business has boomed so 
rapidly he now has i >4 col- 
lege men on call-and its 
definitely not gigoloing, he 
adds. Puim.v if*.. 



She received a contract after her first audition 

Mercedes McCambndge, 20-year-old Mundelein College (Chicago) 

is playing two important dramatic roles over NBC these days 

leeping up with her classes and maintaining a B average. She first attracted 

enti. of radio officials when she appeared with Mundelein's verse speak- 

KcytSm 



U 

•ch 



dre green vegetables lacking m Vitamin D? 
-t Arthur Knudson and Frank Benford of the Albany Medical 
liege .ire searching for the answer to this perplexing question of 
he device shown, which splits up ultra-violet radiation into any 
Itcd for study, the scientists have found that intennittant or 
t ultra-violet rays will aid the formation of vitamin D, 

S. i. m, , S t\ h ■■ 




Aviation*! greatest flying laboratory and its pilot 

A ' T U Amelia Rarhart (center) is shown with Barbara Swecncv and Louise 
/\\V L.3.D Schickler, Purdue University students. |iist after she had taken them on 
a tour of inspection of her new flying laboratory. Purdue is the "home base" for Miss 
Farhart's e xp er iment al work. am,.. pi,,. 



at ion is easily 



I In 



pioneer 



The band is 
ms of a black 
be coats, white 

black bow ties. 
ividual stands, 

of instruments 

.insisted of nine 
I at numerous 
n surrounding 
ide, in addition, 
.'trances. Says 
We ha ve now 

year, and the 
much improved 

The uniform 
id in its black 

the new com- 
■ are bound to 
constantly en- 
arrangements." 
sonnel of t he 
id is as follows: 
>mb '.'$9, Ken 
omb "AH; trum- 

.17; trombone: 

s: Johnny Mc- 
\v; piano: Ellin 
illis Foster '40; 
':J9. 



yers 
s Program 

am, which lias 
the executive 

it tenon Players 

1, will include a 
which lectures 
vill be presented, 
ormance of otu 
uring the winter, 
ng performance, 
' consist of a 

e college except 
ligible for mem- 
»on Players The 
on December 1 
House. 



BOARD 




XHXBG1 




week 




56.00 per 


week 


n Baker I 


«inc 


( 'olonial 


Inn 


»r Sale 





Enjoyable 

at 

NICOM 

I ANT 

l Town Hall 

1 quality 
levera&e* 

nrl Dance 



75c 



the ..^™.™rrre collbg.an. Thursday, November ii. »» 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. Till RSDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 1936 







Wolff 'Prefers Singing to 
Talking' During^tayHere 

Demonstrates Beautiful | f ~ | 

Voice During 



jfratcrnitics 



The Massachusetts State Collage 
Interfraternity Council adopted a new 
constitution at a meeting last Tues- 
day night held at Lambda Chi Alpha. 
The past officers, Kenwood Ross, 



Record Club Has 
Fourteen Albums 

With fourteen albums of recordings 
already purchased, the Record Club 
began its existence on Monday, Nov. 
ifi A wide ran^e in the choice of the 




lambda Helm Mb 

Lambda Delta Mu announces a new 
pledge to the sorority. Hetty Eaton *38 

On Monday evening, Nov. 16, ■ 
dinner was given at the sorority BOUM 



ICAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TO 
PRESENT CHR ISTMAS PLAY 

I ,, ipU s dramatic, musical and re-, p.. "Wfl.7Prkr.Pa" 

neioUfl organizations will cooperate in T 11111 TT tll/,1 I KI It £; 



Playing before an ( 
enthusiastic audience 
ditorium last Monda.v 
Wolff, young singer 
demonstrated both a 

tone voice and excellt 
musicianship. 

Arriving on camput 
ing, Mr. Wolff made 
ance before the stuc 

at the music class o 

noon. Introduced by 
director of the Coace 
Carnegie Corporatio 

auspices Mr. Wolff f 
setts State College, 
peared very nervous a 
"I'd Kathei 

"The only time 1 
is when 1 have tospea 
"I would much rathe 
the piano." 

Hut his shy and ei 
ner only served to en 
Speaking in an er 
accent, he discussed 
Odder and the term 
as applied to German 

"The German peop 

of music because tl 
known composers is 
homes and learned b 
the everyday life." h< 
An A ii th 

Having made an ii 

German lieder, Mr. 

thority on the subje< 
the intricacies of h 

the differences betw 

singing. "In their BO 
difficulty," he said, 
with Iteder as you car 
ing. You simply sit 
in your heart withou 
To illustrate his p< 
ceeded t<> "tog one 

songs. When he ti. 
whether the 'lass 

another one. the 

atlirm.it ive indicalec 
the lieder. Mr. Wl 
another song ami wi 
to continue to Mllf 
most an informal coi 
At lunch, he was < 

{acuity club and m 

the members of th 

Several of the pre 

evident interest in I 

and he was obliged 

with several selcctioi 

Kvi'iiiiig * 

At the concert in 

Wolff's beautiful Ik 

musical technique w 

evidence. Singing n 

German, he portray 

edge of the lott S( 



YOl'R FAV< 

wh 
tht 
HI 
10 
an 
inj 
op 



THE Ml): 

Ha 

35 Pleasant S 



THE NATIONAL S 

3 Main St . 

Try our hiilli- 

Popular Prices 





, \" ^CtCh' 






-r**i 



•>v; 




4b* 



y^fc. 



W\ 



?W s 



He entertains his way through college 
^ * . . Aaron Hershkowtt: is earning his way 

MaglCian through the New York State College of 
Forestry (Syracuse) by presenting magic performance*. Our 
cameraman caught htm in the middle of one of his card-catching 



71,714 for one game 

CI A view of the pre-game fes- 
rOWQ tivities as a near-capacity 
crowd jammed Ohio State's double-decked 
stadium for the Pitt game. 



acts. 



Smart Outfits for Game 
And Post'Game Parties 





A Farm Was This 
Senator's College 



These N 

Me let 



And perfect for after-game parties, too ! 
Smart outfits for the game, which are perfect for fraternity house 
parties later, are worn by the two couples entering the stadium in 

« VJ.A.. U'nrl.l Ph.il.... 

this picture. 



WiJ.- WnrUPhot. 



Molyneaux's famous suit 
having i gold suede jacket blouse 
and a bias cut pleated skirt of navy 
and gray woolen plaid is worn by the 
co-ed . 

I"l| 




AT THE age of 75 most men have come to the 
set of their lives and desire rest most of all. Pu' 
figures, at that age, write autobiographies and da 
over the past. On July it, io?/>, Senator (Jet 
William Norns was 75 and could look back nn 
years of service in Washington. Instead he loo 
forward to another six years as senator, a term 

will last until he is Hi. 

"I have battled, Kitt 
for everything I got. 
he told an interviewer ( 
At 7s he was battling 
opponents in Nebi lsu 
regular Republican m 
Democrat unrecognued 
President Roosevelt, vj 
has spoken ende.iti 

about Senator Norm 
w eapon*: three speechq 
day, a lifetime of stru 
that has conferred on 
rugged farm-trained Ivxly the mantle ot Kon 
Senator Norns' college days were days of po5t| 
ment. Born in Ohio, he worked on farms during 
summer. Student at Baldwin University in Ohio 
Northern Indiana Normal School, he taught X 
during intervening years in order to continue K 
In 1KS;, he received a law degree from Va « 
University, but had to teach another year to f 
law library. He was one of the senators 1 I 
against America's entry m the war. Repul 
name only, he threw aside partisanship year 
ported Al Smith and Roosevelt, thrust his seal 
and iutttng law and untrammeled thinking in ; 
a fight like that over the purchase ot Muscle 
"My College," he says, "had been the farr 
,»rovc it, he still drives a plow through Nebr 
e 'cry summer. 




new 



nd tweeds combine for smart football ensembles 

ue illustrated ,n thff photo taken ot.ts.de the stadium of one < 



Four popular stylo* of COat 
eastern universities. The coats are, left to right. Australr 
tweed with wolf collar, and the inevitable racccxm coat 



focoat, slot mmed topcoat of mixed 




«iK 



Stoddard Talks CAMPUS DANCE BAND IS 



% M i 



on Education in 
American Scene 

"There are certain characteristics 



COMPLETELY REORGANIZED 



Dean to ReDresent 



.1 'Ii. * 



1 nvi 
Sho| 

4.1 




Qi . ^-n . When the University of Ver- 
J.QUL'v_/UX mont grid aggregation met 



Dartmouth they came out on the short end of the 
■ score, 57 to o. The photo at the left shows Hand- 



rahan of Dartmouth carrying the ball around left 

end for a big gain. Colikjiati Dicut Photo by Jone» 



I »-p The University of Louisville's fresh- 

1 Wilis man coach, John Heldman, Jr., is hav- 
SflSMI ing considerable difficulty these days keeping Paul 
• and Donald McKay separate, for they're both out- 
standing candidates for his first year team. 





Phil Burgun '39, manager of the 
Statesmen, announces complete re» 

w vi'ar of the local 

The Statesmen 

liligentty since 
began and are 

1 season. Their 
ic season came 

1, when they 
Bpailon The 

had filled an 
South Hadlev 



at ion is easily 

the pioneer 

The hand is 

DM Of I black 

te coats, white 

black bow t ies. 

[vidua! stands, 

of instruments 





C**efy 



Lee Gehlbach says: "Smoking Camels keeps 
my digestion tuned up and running smooth" 

CAMELS set me right ! " Gehlbach says. " You know, 
chance is only 10% of my business. Keeping alert 
and in fine condition is the other 90%. I smoke Camels 
with my meals, and afterward, for digestion's sake. 
And when I say Camels don't get on my nerves, it 
means a lot." 

Good digestion and healthy nerves are important 
for everyone in this wide-awake era. Camels at meal- 
time and after speed up the flow of digestive fluids 
—increase alkalinity — help bring a sense of well- 
being. So make Camel your cigarette— for digestion's 
sake — for their refreshing "lift." Camels set you 
right! And they do not get on your nerves. 



Co»yTi«hl, int. R. J. Reynolds Tobscco Company . WlnMon S»l»m. N C 



■**-".* 



.W 






L — 




TIE TEST DIVE! 



th. 

I' 

fit 

lhar 

[to 

I An 
tn 

pees 
tak 

let 

lly a 
pc 
U ti 

In 
i»er< 



wn from 4 miles up — motor 
uts screaming— Gehlbach tears 
ike a bullet flashing from a re- 
he bottom of the 2-mile drive 
mil- out wrenches piane and 
limit. Such tests make planes 
ng can happen. A bump in the 
flaw, and the plane can fly 
though dynamited while the 
o his parachute. But, as you 
he right, Lee Gehlbach eats 
njoys his food. Note the Camel 
his hand — one of the many 
Lee enjoys during and after 
own words {above), he gives 
n why Camels are his cigarette. 





COSTLIER 
TOBACCOS! 



Camels are made from finer. MORE 
EXPENSIVE TOBACCOS -Turkish and 
Domestic - than any other popular brand. 




HOLLYWOOD 
RADIO TREAT! 

Camel Cigarettes bring you a 
FULL HOURS ENTERTAIN- 
MENT! . . . Benny Goodman's 
"Swing" Band . . .George Stoll's 
Concert Orchestra . . . Holly- 
wood Guest Stars... and Rupert 
Hughes presides! Tuesday— 9:30 
pm E.S.T., 8:30 pm C.S.T., 7:30 
pm M.S.T., 6:30 pm P.S.T., over 
WABC-Columbia Network. 



(insisted of nine 
I at numerous 
a surrounding 
ide, in addition, 
aranccs. Says 
We have now 
• year, and the 
much improved 
The uniform 
nd in its Mack 
the new crnn- 
I are hound to 

constantly en- 
arrangementa." 

sonnel of the 
id is as follows: 
lmh '39, Ken 
omh "AH; trum- 
■ !7; trombone: 
h: Johnny Mr- 
>y; piano: Kllis 
illis Foster '40; 
*39. 



yers 
Program 

am, which has 
the executive 
itterson Players 
1, will include a 
which lectures 
vill he presented, 
ormance of one 
urine, the winter, 
n^ performance, 
' consist of a 

e College except 
ligible for mem- 
ton I'layers The 

on December 1 

House. 



ItOAKI) 


XMJLBOB 


week 


56.00 per week 


n Maker LttM 


Colonial Inn 


»r Sale 



Injoyable 

at 

Nil A) 9 I 
I ANT 

9 Town Hall 

i quality 
Ii'vrraiirs 

nd Dance 



s 75c 



Hamanan 



^ u,^,^ CQ1XEG.AN. TU.R.SUAY. NOVKMBEB ■ »■ .936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECilAN, Till RSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1!>36 






Wolff 'Prefers Singing to 
Talking' DuringStayHere 

Demonstrates Beautiful || — 7~Z I 

Voice During 



fraternities 



The Massachusetts State College 
Interfraternity Council adopted a new 
constitution at a meeting last lues- 
day night held at Lambda Ch» Alpha. 
The past officers, Kenwood Ross, 



Record Club Has 
Fourteen Albums 

With fourteen albums of recordings 
already purchased, the Record Club 
began its existance on Monday, Nov. 
1« A wide ran^e in the choice of the 



dcvefc tflewa 



Lambda Delta Mu 

Lambda Delta Mu announces a DC 
pledge to the sorority, Hetty Eaton ':i' 

On Monday evening, Nov. 16, 
dinner was fives at the sorority hou- 



ICAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TO 
PRESENT CHRISTMAS PLAY 



iign 



opui dramatic, musical and re- p» 
s organizations will cooperat 



r*f " A TV4\f«tArv for 



Tn Film "Walzerkrieg" 



rwt t r\t 



%T 



Stoddard Talks CAMPUS DANCE BAND IS 
on Education in COMPLETELY REORGANIZED 

American Scene 



"There are certain characteristics 

»f onoK n.iiinn which muke it what it 



Dean to Represent 



Playing before an i 
enthusiastic audience 

ditoriuTO la.st Monday 

Wolff, young mm^t o 
demonstrated both a 
tone voice and exceiU 

musiciansliip. 

Arriving on camp 11 ' 
fog, M r Wolff made 

Bnce before the stu< 

at the music class o 
DOon. Introduced by 
director of the Conce 
Carnegie CorporaUo 

auspices Mr. Woiff v 
setts Slate College, 

peered very nervous a 

•■IM Bathe 

The only time 1 

is when I have to spe; 

"1 would much rathe 

the piano." 

Hut his shy and e 
ner only served to m 
Speaking in an et 
accent, he distussed 
lieder and the term 
as applied to Cermai 

"The German peoj 

of musii because tl 

known compoaen is 

homes and learned fa 

the everyday life," b< 

An A mli 

Ha> ing made an i> 

German lieder, Mr. 

thority on the subje- 

the intricacies of u 
the differences betwi 

ringing. "In ,,u ' ir : ' 
difficulty," be -aid. 

with lieder as you car 
ing. You simply sit 
in your heart withou 

To illustrate his p 

ceeded to ring one 



>ng? 



\\ hen 



h 



ll 



whether the class 

another one: the 
affirmative indicate* 
the lieder. Mr W< 

another >ong and wi 
to continue to ami 

most an informal eoi 
At lunch, he WW ' 
faculty club and w 
the members of th 
Several of the pec 
evident interest in ! 
and he was obliged 
with several seleetiot 
I-a «>nin& < 

At th* concert in 
Wolff's beautiful l>: 

musical technique w 
evidence. Singing ii 
German, he portray 
edge <>f »be lu,k s< 



VOIR FAX 

wb 
th« 
EU 

10 
an 
in{ 
op 



THt MU1 

11» 

35 Pleasant S 



THt NAHONAL S 

3 Main St. 

Try our high- 

Popular Price* 




KM 



A ncn>el football hugging session 
n^ i i Sollie Sherman, hard hitting Chicago back, is brought to earth 
1 aCKie by two determined Purdue tacklers in the third quarter of the 
game which the Boilermakers won, 35 to 7. 



Acme 





Phil BurgUtl '39, manager of the 
Statesmen, announces complete re- 
organization for the year of t h" local 

The Statesmen 

liligently since 
began and are 
I season. Their 
ie season came 
I. when they 
Kpsilon The 
had filled an 

South Hadley 

a lion is easily 

the pioneer 

The hand is 

111s of a black 

te eoats, white 

black lx>w ties. 

ividual stands, 

of instruments 

onsisted of nine 
1 at numerous 
n surrounding 
ide, in addition, 

.1 ranees. Says 

We have now 

year, and the 

much improved 

The uniform 

id in its black 

the new com- 
s are bound to 
constantly en- 
arrangements." 
sonnel of the 
id is as follows: 
»mb '39, Ken 
omb "AH; (rum- 
87; trombone: 
s: Johnny Me- 
>y; piano: Bills 

illis Foster '40; 
'39. 



C 



University 
OII1 of Iowa s sil- 
ver homecoming anni- 
versary will center 
around this corn replica 
of the Empire State 
building. 



In bygone days . . . 

r\1 1 Football dress of 
v-JlVj fifty years ago 
is exhibited in this pic- 
ture taken at a recent 
University of Pennsyl- 
vania celebration. 

Picture*. Inc. 



-'I 




The/ll fight for another undefeated season 
, With two undefeated seasons behind them, Beaver College's 

UhampS hard-playing hockey team is this year practicing diligently to 
maintain its championship standing. 



Acme 



warship 

* ^resents a four- 

hattan College 

r »ut standing amateur 



Honor for the father of relativity theory 

T^POrPP* Dr A "" >crt E ' nstem w;iS invested with an honorary doctorate <>t science it the convoca- 
J^CglCC tion ceremonies of the University of the State of New York. The photo shows the in- 
signia symbolic of the honor being placed on the doctor ■ shoulders. im i; ,,.,.™i 




k v k 



i 



He'll roll this barrel to fame 
n Allan Shorthill practices a novel stunt tbat he hopes will win the 

StUnt pri* and applause at the annual circus staged by Los Angeles 
Junior College students. 



She's Wellesleys seventh president. 
T ■ Mildred H. McAfee (center) became one ol the y<" 

lna.UgUra.tl.On United States last month when she WTU inducted n 
College. She's shown with her fathei and Vassar's President Henty N. Mat< 




Rnnnrl **♦-» D ^ii*>^4 That s the way the music wetu 

IVOUna n KOUnd when the HoryCroas College band 



marched 

Croat note. 



circles I v twee n 



halves of tin 

< "(in 11,1111 I'm .Hi PI 



Dartmouth-Holy 

>h v JUIph W. Brown 



tyers 
i Program 

•1111. which has 
the executive 

illerson Players 
1, will include a 
which lectures 
vill be presented, 
ormance of one 
uring the winter, 
ng performance, 
consist of a 

e college except 
ligihle for mem- 
MMl F 'layers The 
on Decern ber 1 
House. 



BOARD 


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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVMbM««J*_19M 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECS1AN, TIH RSDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 1936 



Wolff 'Prefers Singing to 
Talking' DuringjStayHere 



fraternities 



Demonstrates Beautiful 
Voice During 



The Massachusetts State College 
Interfraternity Council adopted a new 
constitution at a meeting last Tues- 
day night held at Lambda Chi Alpha. 
The past officers, Kenwood Ross, 



Record Club Has 
Fourteen Albums 

With fourteen alliums ot recordings 
already purchased, the Record Club 
began its asbtaaca on Monday, Nov. 
ifi A wide rHP^e in the choice of the 




Lambda Delta Mu 

Lambda Delta Mu announces a DC 

pledge to the sorority, Hetty Baton '•'!'< 

On Monday evening, Nov. 1G, a 
dinner was given at the sorority hou 
...... T*M 



AMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TO 
PRESENT CHRISTMAS PLAY 



i n[)iis dramatic, musical and re* 
,,,,,,]- organizations will cooperate in 

— '-*»«»^» #•'* "A \4vct*»rv for 



Film "Walzerkrieg" 



r*t 



*T 



Stoddard Talks CAMPUS DANCE BAND IS 
on Education in COMPLETELY REORGANIZED 

American Scene — , 



'There are certain characteristics 

onr>h nut inn whii-l> rriiikf it what it 



Dean to Represent 



Playing before 
enthusiastic audi 

ditoriuin last M< 
Wolff young sini 
demonstrated bo 

tunc \ OlCe and el 
musicianship. 

Arri\ ing OH CM 
ing, Mr. Wolff n 
ance before tha 

at l he mUSiC cla 

noon. Introduce* 
director of the Cl 
Carnegie CorpoT 

auspices Mr. Wol 

setts State ColU 

peared very nervo 

•I'd Ita 

"The only tinu 
is when 1 have to ; 
"1 would much r; 
the piano." 

But his shs an. 
ncr only served to 
Speaking in an 
accent, he dis. UI 

lieder and the ter 
,,, applied to Gen 
"The German p 
of music because 
known composers 

homes and U-arne. 

the everyday life.' 

An A i 

Having made a) 



Faces Tellthe Story 

Close-ups of Gridiron Battlers Tell Strange 
Tales of Football Comedy and Tragedy 



German • 

thority on thl 
the inincaeie.- 
ihe difference a 



M 

sul 

of 

het 



tinging. "In their 
difficulty," he aai 
with fist/er as you < 

ing. You simply 
in your la art with 
To illustrate his 
ceeded to ring o 
songs ^ hen he 
whether the class 
ther one: th 




• ■ 



m 



mc Hat 

Mr \ 

:t r song < ir| d ' 

antinua to rf 

-.n informal C 



Ai lumh. he '•■ 
•acuity club and 
the members of t 

: of the pi 
evident interest in 
and he was oblige, 
several selectic 
K\ tttins 
At the concert ii 
WoirTs htautiful 1 
mu> hnique | 

evid- B • Singing i 
-man. he portxa] 
edge of the folk s 





m* 



v 



Fighting for a gain 
Fordham's Joseph Dulkie 
warns all tackters that he s a 
tough customer. Wd-Wp-I 



"fm going to get him" 
A Franklin and Marshall bac tielj 
man starts after a runner tha' 
wiggled his way through the 



& 



WiJc 




Ever alert 
officials must catch every 
movement ot every play if they 
are to officiate tairl) 



Hes just let a pass go to an opposing player 
thrWi ofUCLA is considerably worried as he 
„& Wl**£ Husky catch a ^ attmr- 

tended for him. 





They rem paintings just l%ke they do library booi{s 

A r |- Qpr-\7irP Ham,,ton Allege this fall inaugurated a new plan by which 
I \L t UC1 VltC students may borrow paintings to hang in their room at 
special rates which vary with the value of the painting. College Librarian Rachel 
S. Roberts (right) has charge of the plan devised by art instructor E. W. Root. 



' "' 



» 






- 



*Tve got you! 

Loiko of Michigan makes a 
tackle, and starts chortling. 



Waiting 

to make a tackle, a Boston 

College back purses his lips and 

grits his teeth. 



Fighting for every inch 

Santa Clara University's HaJ 

Seramin is bucking his way alo.^to 

four yard gain, fighting 

tacklers all the way. 



VOIR ¥\M 
wl 

th 

Rl 

10 

an 

inj 

op 



THE Ml) 

II 

35 Pleasant S 



Iff NATIONAL 5 

3 Main Si. 

Try our liiftli- 

Popular Prices 




They wrote Michigan's famed marching song 

MTinncprc W,th the celehratlon °' "Varsity Day" at the University of 
|/U111JJU&CI& Michigan, the Wolverines honored Fred Lawton and Prof. 
' Moore, composers of "'Varsity," their famous football song. It was composed 
them just 2S years ago. 



. 



Phi! Murgun '.'!!», manager of the 
si iiaaiiiwii, announcaa complete re- 
organiaation for the yaar <>f the local 

The Stataamen 
iiligently nnca 

began and are 

I scasun. Their 
ie woaaon came 

1, when they 

Epailon The 

had filled an 
South Hadl.y 

a l ion h easily 
the pioneer 

The band i.s 

•nw of a black 

te OOata, white 

black how t ic-H. 

ividual stands, 

t of instruments 



onaiated of nine 
'1 at numerous 
in surrounding 
ide, in addition, 
arancaa Says 
We have now 
' year, and the 
much improved 
The uniform 
nd in its black 

the new com- 
ta are bound to 

constantly en- 
arrangements." 
sonnel of the 
id is aa follows: 
jmb .59, Ken 
omb ",\H; trum- 
'37; tromhone: 
■; Johnny M< 
2y; piano. Kllis 
'illis Foster '40; 
':J9. 



:- 



M f yom i 






tM< 






*£j~ ft f 




s y^v-rt?* v:::' V % 



<* 



i 



h 




nois campus is one ot the 
mam thoroughfares on that 
420-acre campus. a 



iV, 



&* ..£» 



\X 



->■ *r* 



Honoring a famed educator 

»1 ,U ro f-«'~~ Dignitaries from all over the nation joined 
M nidtlOU with officials of Williams College when 

rated the hundredth anniversary of the induction of 

Kins aj president of that institution. 





ANOEWT AZTEC PIPE 



VES, THAT PIPE 
WAS FOUND IN 
SOME AZTEC 
^RUINS 



MUST MAVE MAD 
LOTS OF TIME 
TO MEwLOWTWEJ^ 
JUDGE _ 




NOW TAKE TMIS 
BP1AR OF MINE. 
IT^S ALREADV 
SMELLING LIKE A 
RELIC. JUST WONT 
GET 
MEUOW 



! WELL, SON, A GOOD 

PIPE DESERVES 

GOOD TOBACCO. I 

MEAN PRINCE 

S ALBERT 



JUST SMELL THAT FRAGQAWT 





ANOTHER THING, PA. 
IS * CRIMP CUT 'SO 



it's Swell, judge, 
the old pipe smokes 



IT WILL CAkE NICE " SWEETER ALREADY 
AND EVEN AND SMOKE 
COOL AND THE % B«TE' 
IS TAKEN 



T 



oil 1 social scholarship. 



At Drake they have given up green .^ull CApi 

Stnw+ats and booklgO band m hand fol I htkt I IfHVCTWtV 

StraWS required to WCtl the hats inMCSd d the usual gnvn -I" 
big bonfire between the halves ..I .. big |MM 



hev 



11 I 



They do it up riglii oi Rolla 

I In- Mmaouri College oi Mined freahman in 
11 the foreground h, ( s inst h.ul his hotly covered 
while In* was forced t.» chew tobacco and had egg 

his hau. 



C«»r. . MM, «. J H«Tno4d. TolMrro T" milu 




HEREi WHY THERElS NO OTHER TOBAaO UKE PRINCE ALBERT: RAJS CHOICE 
MELLON TOBACCO -"CRIMP CUT'FOR COOLNESS— WITH THE "BITE" REMOVED BY 

SPECIAL PROCESS. ITS THE LARGEST-SELLING TOBACCO 
IN TH E WORLD. AND SWEa H)R'MAt<IN'S' CI6ARETTES. 

PRINCE ALBERT MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE: 

Smofce 20 fr.«r«nt pipWul. of Prince Albert. H you don't find it the mellow- 
***' ta.t.r.t pipe tobacco you ever Mnoked, return the pocket tin witb the 
reet of the tobacco in it to u. at any time within a month from thi. nate, ami 
we will refund fnll purchase price, plus poetaee. 



in a 



SO 






nipefnU of fro- 
■raat tehacce in 
e»e»r 2-onn«e tin 
•f Prince Albert 






(5ir*Htef) R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 



KV h Wmefn Balew 

Prince Albert 



THE NATION At 
JOY SMOKE 



iyers 

! Program 

am. which has 

thp ezacutive 

itteraon Playen 

i. will includf ,1 

which N-ctures 

vill \n> pri-.<ntc<l. 

bimance «>t ona> 

uring t he wint«-r, 
njf pcrlurmiincc, 
.■ consist of h 

e college except 
ligihle for mem- 
*on Players The 
on December 1 
House. 



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XMXMal 

week 

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<oc 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1936 



Wolff 'Prefers Singing to 
Talking' During Stay Here 



fraternities 



Demonstrates Beautiful 
Voice During 



The Massachusetts State College 
Interfraternity Council adopted a new 
constitution at a meeting last Tues- 
day night held at Lambda Chi Alpha. 
The past officers, Kenwood Ross, 



Record Club Has 
Fourteen Albums 

With fourteen albums of recordings 
already purchased, the Record Club 
began its existance on Monday, Nov. 
1« A wide ranoe in the choice of the 




Lambda Delta Mu 

Lambda Delta Mu announces an. 
pledge to the sorority, Hetty Eaton '89 

On Monday evening, Nov. 16. a 
dinner was given at the sorority hou> 



Playing before 
enthusiastic audi 

ditoriuni last Mi 
Wolff, young sin} 
demonstrated bo 
tone voice and e3 
musicianship. 

Arriving on cai 
ing, Mr. Wolff rr 
a nce before the 

at the music cla 

noon. Introduced 

director of the Cl 
Carnegie <'on>or 
auspices Mr. Wol 
S4 >tts State Colli 
peared very nervo 
"Ptl Ka 

"The only time 
is when I have to : 
"1 would much n 
the piano." 

Hut his shy an 
ner only served t( 
Speaking in an 

accent, be discus- 

//,</./■ and the tflf 
as applied to Gen 

"The German p 

of music because 
known composers 
homes and learne< 

the everyday lift,' 
An A i 
Having made a 
German lieder, IV 
thority on the sul 
the intricacies ot 

the differences be 

singing. "In their 
difficulty," he sai 
with lieder as you t 
ing. You simply 
in your heart with 
To illustrate his 

ceeded to *i"K «' 
•onge. When be 

whether the < las. 
another one; tl 
affirmative indical 
the lieder, Mr. > 

another song and 

to continue to si 
most an informal c 

At lunch, he win 
faculty club and 
the members of t 
Several of the p 
evident interest in 
and he was oblige 
with several selectii 
Evening 

At the concert i 
Wolff's beautiful I 

musical technique 

evidence. Singing 

German, he portre 

edge of the folk !■ 




YOUB FAV 

w 

th 

R 

1C 

ai 

in 

of 



Iltt MU 

11 

35 Pleasant S 




THE NATIONAL J 



3 Main St. 



high 



Popular PriceH 



The Action Camera Records 



The Action camera ncw^a • • • ,. 

Plays too Quick for Eye to Catch 




A Galiobmg Gael floats through the air 
try ,ng to knock down a p£ by Byrne, of U.yol.U„wer Slt y (Los Angeles) ,n the gam, ,1, 
ing whTh 60,000 .spectators saw St. Mary I defeat the Uon., .9 to 7- 



Autograhh see^rs stoarmed, interviewers buzzed 
A.- R,h.„d IV„,U, MeTripctonO^r, ^<^^ 

He s shown 



encores at his hrst appearance 



rounded by students who *ni K ht hts autographs and opinion*. 
with Mary Lou Bradley. 



I 





And heres another floating through the air act 

But th, t,me it'.a University of "J^^^^t^ ttSy" ^ " " T 
Dunn of Southern California (on ground) from hlocking a punt by Henry. 



A truly international freshman class 
« The Rev F L. Meade, C. M., Niagara University 

WelCOme dean, talks with Raul Anselm. of Puerto Rico and John 

, Hubbard. Lima, Peru, upon the,, arrival it the New York college where 

they will register ai freshmen. 





-OoK' saxd Mr - Conner °f Vir z mia 

M Navy's Bill Ingram leaped into the air and avoided being tackled. 



1 







. ■ 



Man in the iron masl\ 

Andy R.xldenlvrrv. first string University of Georgia 
PrOteCtlOn quarterback, pf*e« nfcely W the cameraman can get 

fgjod photo of the £ -Ml head and fk. protector he wears to protect his 
broken nose. 



. m 1 iiw ^' ■ — ••-** 
These Villanova tackier s believe m doing a job right 
M they prove here in a photo which shows them piling up Of) Farkas ot the I h 
Detroit. Villanova won. i, W 6. 



AMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TO 
PRESENT CHRISTMAS PLAY 



pus dramatic, musical and re- 

M ,,u~ organizations will cooperate in 

. stntation of "A Mystery for 

"hristmas," a Christmas story in 

hleau form, it was announced today. 

U will probably be given publicly 

Si tick bridge Hall on Thursday, 

., 1 7, just before students go home 

holidays. 

Choir in Foundation 

The choir will be the foundation 

in the pageant. The Roister 

oistera will supply actors and tech- 

Icians, and Mrs. Hicks will direct 

.luncing. Students who wLsh to 

, part must get in touch with Mr. 

tretton or Mr. Williams today. Re- 

Lgrsalfl will start at 4 p.m. today in 

be Memorial Building. 

il on a fifteenth century mys- 

play, the presentation, called "A 

[ygtery for Christmas," is written by 

ird D. McKinney. It was first 

nted on the campus two years 

when Mrs. Baker directed a 

fculty group in the program for the 

pnefit of the faculty. Due to the 

of the offering, it was repeated 

. i-.tr. 

There are twenty-eight roles to be 

I: Mary, Gabriel and six attend- 

t ingels; twelve other angels, two 

whom are small; five shepherds: 

fid i he Three Wise Men. 



iformal in Drill 
Hall Next Tuesday 

The Informal Committee announces 

jat another one of its dances will be 

lid in the Drill Hall next Tuesday 

lening from 8 to 12. Dave Rossiter, 

[airman of the committee, has se- 

[n-d Ed Cerruti and his orchestra. 

Ill (lathes will be in order. 

lit will he remembered that Cerutti 

Kyed here for the Rhode Island game 

formal and that he was also the 

■standing band during the Ambers, 

|u i parties while playing at the 

« Kpsilon house. The committee 

lnh also includes Phil Layton, 

n Ross. Louis Bongiolatti and Russ 

fiu< k. wishes to call attention to the 

Ct that co-eds have 12:30 o'clock 

rmission which enables them to 

itinue the dance until 12:00. 

'ri/i s will be awarded to the win- 

ta n! the Collegiate contest and the 

ipli showing the most originality 

It In ir costume. 



Film "Walzerkrieg" 
To be Shown Next 



MEET AT 



lARSftOTirS CAfE 



ALLANTINE'S ALE 



HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 



I Visit A Pleasant Memory 



"Walzerkrieg" will be the second in 
! the series of German language films 
being presented each Monday after- 
noon at the Amherst Theater. The 
films have been procured cooperatively 
by the departments . of German at 
Amherst College and Mass. State. 

Next Monday's film, meaning 
"Waltz Time in Vienna," is a musical 
farce featuring many of the more 
popular melodies of Johann Strauss 
and Joseph Lanner and interwoven 
with a sprightly story laid in Vienna. 

CAMERA EXHIBIT 
DISPLAYS WORLD 
FAMOUS PRINTS 

Prints reproduced in the American 
Journal of Photography for 1937 com- 
prize the present exhibition of the 
Amherst Camera Club in Goodell 
Library, the most remarkable col- 
lection shown this year. 

Egypt, Austria, Czechoslavakia, 
India, Germany, Spain, Hungary and 
Japan are among the many lands 
represented by contributors to this 
exhibit. Without exception all the 
photographs are unusually fine. 

Frt-utnrc A ust rali.ni Portrait 

A portrait entitled The Scout by 
Julian Smith of East Melbourne, 
Australia is placed in feature position. 
In it the rough, weather-beaten fea- 
tures are shown lit up, as if he were 
inspired by contemplating some beauty 
of nature, perhaps an Australian 
sunrise. 

Most striking of all is the picture 
called Duel. In dim morning light 
two figures engage in violent combat, 
while filling the space above their 
heads is the shadowy imprint of a 
woman's face. 

Child I'm lures 

There are two delightful child 
pictures, both with amusing titles, 
The Nudist and A Bath for Heulah. 
Still more humorous are The Esthetic 
Side, which portrays a tough guy 
plucking petals from a daisy, and the 
prim spinster of Typical British 
"Girir 

Two lovely prints picture the beauty 
of snow and ice clinging to branches 
and twigs of trees, Translueence and 
Winter in the Woods. Several beauti- 
ful landscapes included in the collec- 
tion are all the more interesting since 
they depict scenes in foreign lands. 
Such are Glen Shiel from Scotland and 
Landscape from Belgium. 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



PKINSCRIPT by BATON 

The latest styles in printed stationery 

A.J. Hastings m 7SSSSJT i 17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
••LET DAVE DO IT" 



Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 



Only dry cleaning plant in town. 



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Telephone 828 



Stoddard Talks 
on Education in 
American Scene 



"There are certain characterist Let 
of each nation which make it what it 
is," stated Alexander J. Stoddard, 
superintendent of schools at Provi- 
dence, R. I„ in convocation today, in 
discussing "The Place of Education 
in the American Scene." 

"Any number of characteristics 
might be selected," continued Mr. 
Stoddard, "depending on one's judg- 
ment as to their relative importance. 
For the purposes of this discussion 
three are chosen. If one were to at- 
tempt to paint the United States on 
canvas, these traits would constitute 
the highlights of the scene. Let us 
consider them briefly, discussing the 
function of education in relation to 
each one." 

In the first place," declared the 
speaker, "this scene must present 
some concept of the vast scale upon 
which our country exists, its great 
distances and far-flung boundaries. It 
extends from an eastern to a western 
ocean and lies between two types of 
civilization. It has towering moun- 
tains, mighty rivers, rolling plains, 
wide deserts, and great forests. It is 
a long way from the potato farms of 
Maine to the motion picture studios 
of California, from the orange groves 
of Florida to the salmon fishing of 
Washington. 

"Everyone of us asks for the right 
to he different. The only way in 
which that right can be maintained is 
for each one of us to respect the right 
of everyone else to differ." 

Tolerance 

"The schools and colleges are not 
the only educational agencies estab- 
lished by society that can deal with 
this subject," continued the superin- 
tendent. "However, all other agencies 
are handicapped in varying degrees by 
the fact that we expect these institu- 
tions, which extend even to the re- 
motest part of our country and are 
available to all of the people to assume 
responsibility for inculcating tolerance 
as the first essential in the program of 
education? 

The development of attitudes is a 
day-to-day process continuing over a 
long period of time. It involves the 
use of every experience, however 
small or large, as the occasion for 
building proper reactions. There is 
much evidence that the schools and 
colleges are making real progress in 
teaching tolerance. Critical judgment, 
the ability to weigh evidence, an 
understanding of the importance of 
facts, the large repositories of truth, 
are all component parts of tolerance 
and are the daily grist of the best 
classroom procedures. 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 




Mhkn. Stnte 
Mudentn are 
invited to our 
More for the 

IntcM in 

riding togs 

and 

Nportwenr. 



We stock breeches, riding hoots. 

Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



CAMPUS DANCE BAND IS 
COMPLETELY REORGANIZED 



Dean to Represent 
M.S.C. at Gathering 



Dean William Machmer will repre- 
sent Massachusetts State College at 
the first annual College-choosing day to 
be held in Springfield, Mass. at Classi- 
cal High School on December 8. 

Held under the auspices of the high 
schools of Springfield, a conference 
will be held between representatives 
of various colleges of New England, 
New York, and Pennsylvania and the 
senior students of the high schools to 
enable the students to obtain infor- 
mation to aid them in making a choice 
of a college. 

Representatives from each college 
in which students have shown an in- 
terest will be asked to meet groups of 
these students and their parents, and 
to answer questions. 



ANNOUNCE RECENT 
CHANGES MADE IN 
HORT. MAN. STAFF 



Changes made in the teaching 
personnel of the department of horti- 
culture manufactures have been re- 
cently announced. Dr. Paul D. Isham, 
instructor in the department, has re- 
signed and accepted a position in the 
U. S. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils 
at Pullman, Washington. His present 
work includes research on utilization 
of apples and the by-products of 
apples. 

Dr. J. A. Clague of the experiment 
station staff in the department has 
been promoted to the position of 
assistant professor, and he is carrying 
on the teaching work of Dr. Isham. 

Walter A. Maclinn \'5:i, M.S. '84, 
has been appointed instructor in the 
department. He is continuing his re- 
search for his degree of doctor of 
philosophy. 



YES! 



I'M GOING TO 
I UK MILITARY HALL 



NEW SMALL (JIFFS 



Phil Burgun ','19, manager of the 
Statesmen, announces complete re- 
organization for the year of the local 
exponents of swing. The Statesmen 
have been rehearsing diligently since 
a week before classes began and are 
anticipating a successful season. Their 
initial appearance of the season came 
on Amherst week end, when they 
played at Sigma Phi Kpsilon The 
night previous they had filled an 
engagement at the South Hadley 
high school. 

The present organization is easily 
distinguishable from the- pioneer 
Statesmen of last year. The band is 
now arrayed in uniforms of a black 
and white motif: white coals, white 
shirts, black pants, and black bow ties. 
The players have individual stands, 
and a new combination of instruments 
is being used. 

The band last year consisted of nine 
men, and they played at numerous 
high school proms in surrounding 
communities. They made, in addition, 
several campus appearances. Says 
Manager Burgun: "We have now 
been together a whole year, and the 
result can he seen in a much improved 
synchrony and tone. Tin- uniform 
appearance of the hand in its black 
and white dress, and the new com- 
bination of instruments are hound to 
please. And we are constantly en- 
larging our library of arrangements." 

The complete personnel of the 
present eight-piece hand is as follows: 
saxes: Whit Whiteomb '.'59, Ken 
Dorman '.'19, Jack Slocomb '.'{8; trum- 
pet: Don Mercer SM7; trombone: 
Ed Malkin '119; drums: .Johnny Mc- 
Laughlin, South Hadley; piano: Kllis 
Sullivan '.'19; bass, Willis Foster '40; 
manager, Phil Burgun "19. 



Patterson Players 
Announce Program 

A tentative program, which has 
been formulated by the executive 
committee of the Patterson Players 
for the coming season, will include a 
monthly minting at which lectures 
and readings of plays will he presented, 
a possible public performance of one- 
act plays some time during the winter, 
and the regular spring performance, 
which will probably consist of a 
three-act play. 

All members of the college except 
undergraduates are eligible for mem- 
bership in the Patterson Players The 
next meeting will be on December 1 
at the Faculty Club House. 



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NBAS mi COLLBGR 

Rooms: $2.2f> per week 

Board: $fi.00 per week 
At Mrs. Webb's on Baker Line 
In the rear of the Colonial Inn 
Paddles For Sale 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

CfcANDCNMCI 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
FimmIs jii!<I IJeverajieM 

Dine. Wine and Dance 



BTGEONIC 

Men's Suits 75c 



DRY CLEANING 

Plain Dresses 



75c 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



w. A. C. Library. 



6 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 193« 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



NKTTLKTON SHOES 

Try the Pencil Test 



I'OSTl KK CLASSES 

Continued from Page 1 

close attention and with a critical eye. 

But the exercises seem to he having 
their effect. The idea behind the classes 
is not new: in effect they are the same as 
the special classes held last year, 
called reconditioning classes. Hut the 
effect last year did not particularly 
create any great impression upon those 
students who were not "in the know." 
Being fore-warned, the student body 
it is hoped, will be duly impressed by 
the change for the better in co-ed 
classmates. 

"Changes on this campus are not all 
in charge of the Grounds Department!" 
is the girls' slogan, and they're out 
to make good. 



WINTER CARNIVAL 

Continued from Page 1 
favored a two-day carnival program 
rather than the former three-day 
affair. This concentrates a large 
number of activities such as a pa- 
geant, a ball, hockey games, skating 
exhibitions, skiing, toboganning, box- 
ing and wrestling and ski-joring into 
a comparatively short period, but the 



committee feels that those taking part 
in the carnival should be assured of 
"something doing every minute." 

Members of the Outing Club, under 
supervision of the committee have 
spent several Sundays cleaning prac- 
tice slopes, ski runs and zig-zag runs 
at Bull Hill. Plans are now being 
made for amateur ski-jumping com- 
petition, down-hill and obstacle racing 
for women and ski-joring. 



TREES DEDICATED 

Continued from Page 1 

Dr. Lindsey 

Dr. Lindsey was graduated from 
M.S.C. in 1883 and received his 
Master's degree and Doctor's degree 
from the University of Gottingen in 
Germany in 1891. He returned to 
M.S.C. in 1892 as associate chemist 
in the Experiment Station. From 
1895 to 1937 he was in charge of 
various experiments with feeds and 
feeding, becoming vice-director of 
the station in 1909, a position which 
he held until his retirement in 1932. 

He was head of the department of 
chemistry from 1911 to 1928, retir ng 
from that position in that year to 



devote more time to research activi- 
ties. He was made professor emeritus 
Dr. Lindsey is a member of the local 
chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi and of 
the national honorary society, Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

Dr. ChiimlM'rltiin 
Dr. Chamberlain, present professor 
of organic chemistry, was graduated 
from Iowa State College in 1890, re- 
ceiving his Master's degree from there 
in 1892. He later received his Doctor's 
degree from Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. He has published several books 
on organic chemistry, one of which 
ran into three editions. He came to 
M.S.C. in 1909. He is a member of 
several scientific societies, Phi Kappa 
Phi and Phi Beta Kappa. 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

Continued from Page 1 
which was conducted by members of 
Adelphia at the request of President 
Baker, had as its speaker Mr. Harold 
W. Smart of the department of eco- 
nomics. He discussed "The Idea of 
College Spirit." 

Mr. Smart stressed the need for 
more cooperation from the entire 



student body and made clear in no 
uncertain terms the untiring efforts 
which have been expended by the 
members of Adelphia towards creating 
enthusiasm among their classmates. 

David Rossiter, president of the 
society introduced the speaker. Other 
members of Adelphia including Ken- 
wood Ross, vice-president; Walter 
Guralnick, secretary; Wendell Lap- 
ham, Carl Swanson, James Cutter, 
and Robert Spiller sat on the plat- 
form. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Continued from Page 2 

be attended in the same building as 

before — the south unit of the three. 

In this connection, a change of out- 
patient hours will be put into effect 
November 30. Students wishing out- 
patient care will be expected to ob- 
serve these new hours. 

9:00 — 11:30 a.m. 
3:00 — 6:00 p.m. 

First hours only will be held on 
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. 

Emergencies will be attended at 
anytime, at the out-patient depart- 
ment, if open, at the Doctor's office 



in the Physical Education Build mj 
or at the Infirmary. 

Fine Arts Program 

At the next Fine Arts program 
Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 in th 
Memorial Building, Dr. Goldberg wij 
present a lecture on "Shakespeare 
Donne, and the Poetic Realization <fl 
Death." 

Mellorall Club 

A meeting of the Menorah Societjj 
will be held at 6 p.m. immediateljf 
after Vespers in the Memorial Build. | 
ing on Sunday, Nov. 22. 

A.R. DEGREE 

Continued from Page 1 

"Massachusetts State College, grant! 
ing the B.S. degree, has in its curriculj 
every subject that is necessary it 
order to receive the A.B. degret. j 
graduate of M.S.C. who has majors 
in the department of languages am'j 
literature, and who receives a .B.$- 
degree upon graduation, has compli-tec 
a course of study that is equivalent 
(and in many cases identical) to tht 
course of study that a person receivini 
the A.B. degree has completed." 




&Wf€ 



You know that a cigarette 

can be mild; that is, when you smoke it 
it's not harsh or irritating. 

You know that a cigarette can 
have a pleasing taste and aroma. 

When you smoke a cigarette and find 
that it has the right combination of mild- 
ness, good taste, and aroma, it just seems 
to satisfy you . . . gives you what you want. 



/ smoke Chesterfield all 
the time, and they give 
me no end of pleasure. 







RED CROSS 

DRIVE 
NETS $200 




Mpi 



FIRST 
FORMAL 
FRIDAY 



,1. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1936 



No. 10 



aker Opens Contest 
For College Symbol 



[hree Cash Prizes to Be 
Awarded to Students 
Submitting Outstanding 
Designs in Contest 

As h result of a suggestion made to 

L College, President Baker has au- 

lorized the awarding of prizes of $10, 

and $3 for the three best figures or 

■ urns significant of the College sub- 

litu-d by the students. 

At Many Colleges 
Symbols are in use at many colleges, 
kpcaring on banners, stationery, and 
at. luations. The Dartmouth Indian 
Ld the West Point Sword and Pen are 
iro examples, "it was pointed out. 
I Where symbols have been used 
ley have taken a variety of forms. 
Imetimes a human figure, sometimes 
[suggestive design, and sometimes a 
Vt in* live architectural feature of the 
Lupus will be used to characterize 
{college. The designs should, as far 
Possible, relate to the college in 
in intimate way." 
Rules 
I'llu following rules have been es- 
lished to govern the student com- 
It it ion: 
1. This competition is open to all 
pis tired students in the College, 
rluding graduate students, under- 
iiduate students, and students in 

Stoekbridge School. 
b. The decision of the judges will 
baaed upon the idea presented 
mer than the skill with which it is 
Bwti. Consideration will be given 
proposals not represented by a 
swing, provided the idea is so 
Continued on Page 6 



.A.A. STOPS ALL 
lO-ED COMPETITION 

L\t a recent meeting of the Women's 

nletu Association Council, it was 

lanimously voted to discontinue 

[ersorority competition. A plan for 

(omen's athletic program similar to 

now in operation at the University 

| Wisconsin was adopted, and will be 

into effect immediately. 

rum now on, girls interested in 

tiotn -[>ort8 will be organized into 

|antte units; the VV.A.A. Council 

be i om posed of the chairmen of 

p ot these clubs. 

ompetition between class teams 

II hi held within each club; with 

■tion of the rifle team, there 

I" no outside competition. It is 

|M understood that this plan is in 

nature of an experiment; if it is 

1 il it will become a permanent 

ture on the campus. 



|eceipts Total $200 
'or Red Cross Drive 



In a report issued yesterday, David 

Slt ' ; 37, chairman of the Ameri- 

Red n.ss drive, announced that 

Hnhutioris from the student body 



'hi-cl 
t<>un 



by 
Stt 



-01.50, nearly twice the 

'ted last year. 

!l ' . which lasted six days, 

red by Adelphia, assisted 

feftota and the Women's 

ifnt • i ernment Association. 

utire student body, four 

' •< ponded with an average 

Continued on Page 4 



TO SELECT 
COURSES AT 
EARLY DATE 



New Plan Eliminates 
Usual Confusion 



Announcement has come from the 
offices of the Dean that upperclassmen 
will register for their second semester 
courses before the Christmas holidays. 
Previously, registration for second 
semester courses has been delayed 
until just before the beginning of the 
second semester. 

Eliminates < onl umioii 

Registration will begin on Monday, 
December 7 and will continue through 
a period of two weeks until Saturday, 
December 19. The new plan has been 
designed to eliminate the confusion of 
last-minute changes in schedules that 
has characterized the registration peri- 
ods of other years. Heretofore sched- 
ules have been made out hurriedly and 
oftentimes in the confusion of final 
examination week, with the result that 
the registrar's office was later con- 
fronted with numbers of students re- 
questing changes in their schedules. 
Under the new plan the administration 
hopes to have all the problems and 
the routine of registration cared for 
before the second semester begins. 
Pre-holiday registration will give stud- 
ents the opportunity of carefully 
considering their schedules during the 
vacation period, and of making re- 
visions before final examinations com- 
Continued on Page 5 



Name Sophomores 
To Business Board 



FEATURED 
AT 

BALL 



Honorary Colonel to 
Be Chosen by Ballot 




FELIX FERDINANDO 



IRENE JAN IS 



Names of sophomores appointed to 
the business board of the Collegian 
this semester were announced today 
by Kenwood Ross, business manager. 
The four men are Abraham Carp, 
Allen Gove, Charles Rodda, and 
Henry Wynn. 



Renovation of 
Old Chapel to 
Take 4 Months 



Under a grant of $45,000, the Old 
Chapel, whose stately tower has risen 
above the campus for 51 years, is to 
be renovated. 

The Chapel, which has been used 

intermittently for classrooms and a 

library, will once more be used for 

1 Sunday vespers. In addition to a 

meeting place for Vespers, the second 

floor will contain a small auditorium. 

] The first floor is to have five class- 

' rooms and fifteen offices. The head- 

I quarters of the Language and Litera- 

j ture, and History departments will be 

located here. 

Keady in April 
The rennovation will take about 
four months, and will probably be 
ready for occupation in April, though 
doubtlessly it will not be put into 
regular use until next fall. E. J. 
Pinney of Springfield, contractor for 
the Goodell Library, is handling the 
construction. 

Rebuilding of the Chapel was sched- 
uled to start in October, 1935, but 
the awarding of the necessary funds 
was not approved until recently. The 
Continued on Page 6 



Monroe, Fortin in 
Alternate Leads 
of Current Play 

Constance C. Fortin '.'59, Lucille A. 
Monroe '37, Donald W. Cadigan '39, 
and Lawrence l.evinson '38 will head 
the cast which has been selected for 
the courtroom mystery play The Night 
of January lfith, according to the 
announcement made by Professor 
Frank Prentice Rand. This play will 
be presented upon the evenings of 
February 26 and 27 by the Roister 
Doisters. 

To tlternate IiiiU 

Last year when important leads 
were alternated by various members 
of the cast in Othello, this new style of 
presentation worked so well that it 
was decided to repeat the same 
technique this year. 

Constance C. Fortin, and Lucille A. 
Monroe will alternate in the part of 
Karen Andre and Nancy Lee Faulkner, 
while Donald W. Cadigan, and Law- 
rence Levinson will alternate in the 
part of the Defense Attorney Stevens 
and John Graham Whitfield. 

The Night of January \6th is a court- 
room mystery play with the final 
expositions of fact withheld. The 
Continued on Page 4 



Modern Pond Parties Lack Ceremony of Old Days; 

Reporter Finds Stage for Ducking is Missing 



The Collegian is indebted to Francis 
C. Pray of the College News Service for 
much of the material contained in the 
following story. 



Imagine a classroom out on the is- 
land of the college pond. Difficult? 
Professor Babson, 'way back in '00 
found such a possibility very probable 
when he strode into what he thought 
was his classroom and found not a 
chair, desk or bench in sight. His stu- 
dents were lolling in various attitudes 
about the empty room. History is 
silent on the subject, but he probably 
looked dazed for a moment and then 
thundered, "What's going on here?" 

The students pointed out the window. 
And there, on the island of the col- 
lege pond, were ranged the chairs, 
row on row, and in front of them, the 
proud desk and chair of Professor 



Babson. Rumor has it that no one 

was ever formally accused of the prank. 

Different Today 

Students of today actually have 
little to do with the pond. The rope 
pull each fall, a little hockey and ska- 
ting in the winter, and the annual can- 
vass of its waters by students of Ent. 
26 are about all the activities which 
center at the pond. 

True, it has its place in picture after 
picture of the campus. To students and 
alumni, the college pond, with that 
peculiarly barren island in the center, 
is almost symbolic of the college. Its 
Bi-annual delta inspires a few editori- 
als but beyond this point the pond 
just isn't what it used to be. 

Up until 1926, for example, the 
much-quoted pond parties were an 
annual event. In that year, however, 
an edict strictly enforced discouraged 



any further parties on such a large 
scale. 

The parties themselves were very 
simple. Some freshmen who had af- 
fronted a sophomore would be awaken- 
ed by the "committee" very, very late 
at night. Taken to the pond, the fresh- 
man was thrown bodily in by two 
rugged sophomores. He was catapulted 
from a staging built especially for the 
occasion, and should one ducking fail 
to dampen his spirit, he was tossed in 
again. All this, understand, in his 
night-shirt and on a very cool night. 

It would be foolish to even hint that 
the edict dispensed with pond parties 
altogether. It really did dispense only 
with the staging. Only last year, just 
before the Thankspiving vacation, 
certain members of the class of '39 
had their fling. Just inquire around. 
Continued on Page 4 



Military Ball Will Feature 
Felix Ferdinando and 
His Park Central Hotel 
Orchestra 

A unique method of selecting the 
honorary colonel for the military ball 
will feature tomorrow evening's pre- 
sentation of the first formal event of 
the winter social season. 

Chosen by Majors 

The honorary colonel will be selected 
by the junior and senior military 
majors attending the ball. Each man 
in uniform will be issued a ballot on 
which, before the fifth dance, he will 
indicate his choice. The honorary 
colonel will be announced immediately 
after the grand march. 

The color scheme for the affair will 
be red, white and blue as a back- 
ground for especially designed silhou- 
ettes. Dancing will be, as previously 
announced, from 9 to 2 to the music 
of Felix Ferdinando and his Park 
Central Hotel Orchestra. Tickets 
may be purchased at the door of the 
Drill Hall during the affair. 

Couple* Attending 

Among the couples attending the 
affair will be the following: 

I adet Li James I'" Cutter, Miss Muriel ( .1111, 

DooaJd K. Tu.ker, IliM Mahatlr Booth; Kritr 

Windbl.ul. Miss Betty Dolliver; Ruh.ud Kin*. 
Miss Kay WiiiK.ite; Robert Spiller. Miss Ruth 
Kunsell.i; ( 'aili-t l,t. Letoy (I. irk, Miss Betty 
Reynolds. 

Cadet Sut. tbobwt Lyons. Mi^s (Catherine 
m.k lnnei , i- l.-i . ii.-r I'routy, Miss Anne Corcoran; 

Robert Dunn, Miss M.njotie Smith; John Dunlop. 
Miss Rita Buckley; Cadet S«t. William Riley. 
Miss Mary Ralston of South Iladley; MttGbeti 
Nejaine. Miss Teiesa Kearney, Cadet 1,1 1/iiim 
A. Breaiilt. Miss Barbara Strode. 

I i let |,t. KeOWOOd Ross, Miss J.n >iue|in.- 
Stewart. Fred I>avis. Mis, Ixnst h.is<- of I'oitlaud. 
Maine, Joseph Donahue. Miss Kli/.abeth I'leury: 
Ilerlieit Tetie.iult. Miss Sylvia Russell, (adet 
S({t. Floyd VV. Townsley. Miss Rettina Hall 
Robert Kyet. Misa Helen < .mid ol Ml. Holyoke, 
Cadet ski. CtWaid Curtis. Miss Freda Hall. 

I idet l.t. Wendell B> l-apham. Miss M.nv 
WriKllt of Mt. Holyoke; Waller Kpstein. Misi 
Ruth Strauss of Smith: Henry Siehol. Miss IVkus 

< mien of Springfield; Cadet l.t. David PatHaDU, 

Mis> Marjorie Joyal of Methuen, Mal.om Butter, 

Continued on Page 4 



RING COMMITTEE 
SELECTS DESIGN 



Following in the footsteps of colleges 
the country over and continuing a 
tradition that began more than a 
century ago at West Point and 
Annapolis, the King Committee this 
week selected a permanent class ring 
for M.S.C. The contract was awarded 
to the Ilobbins Company of Attleboro, 
a Massachusetts concern and a pion- 
eer in its field. 

The ring's design, selected from 
those submitted by four companies, 
was chosen because it was considered 
by the committee to be the most 
symbolic of the college. 

Chapel lower ami College Seal 
Incorporated on one side of the 
shank is the chapel tower and on the 
other side appears an adaptation of 
the college seal worked into a crest, 
with the words "Massachusetts State 
College" substituted for the state 
motto. On both sides of the shank 
class numerals have been superimposed 
on an open book. 

The stone will be a ruby, since its 
color best approximates the college 
maroon. Immediately surrounding the 
stone is "Massachusetts State College 
—1863". The detail on the ring has 
Continued on Page 6 



© 1936. HGCfTt I MVt«S TOMCCO CO. 



- , ^HX DS3 i¥V i rnd 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. UKCKMBKK 3. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3. 19311 




Collegian 



/ftageacbtiae 

Official newsp aper of the Massachusetts State College. Published every Thursday by the -indents . 

LOL'IS A. BREAULT '37. Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM '38, Managing Editor WALTER GURALMCK '37. Associate Editor 



EDITORIAL 

Campus 
PHILIP B. BHIFF :t7. Edits) 
KM HARD i ■ DESMOND '57. 
JAMES C. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. I'LOWKK U 
MAURICE TONKIN '38 
THOMAS J. I EN RIGHT '39 
MARY T. MEEHAN '» 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD :«> 
MABELLE BOOTH "30 
BETT1NA HALL "39 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWICZ '40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS 40 
NANCV K. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK -10 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '40 
ELIZABETH STLTSMAN '40, Secreury 



BOARD 

Athletics 
JULIAN H. KATZEFF 38, Editor 

MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN 38 
ALFRED M SWIKKN '38 
JOHN E. FH.los '40 
ARTHl'R A NOYES '40 

Make-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '39. Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

Stockbridge Correspondents 
RALPH HARRIS S'37 
GEORGE TROWHRIDOE S'37 

Financial Adviser 
PROP, LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. OOLDBERG 




BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37. Business Manager 
Business Assistants 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38. Subscription Mgr. 
WILLIAM B GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 
M TCHFLL F. NEJAME '38 DONALD L. SILVERMAN '38 
"bRHAM - AR."39 CHARLES RODDA '39 
Al AN < .< A E ':«. HENRY WINN '39 



37, Circulation Mgr. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



Make all orders payable to The Massachusetts 
Collegian. In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager as soon as 
possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
tributions are sincerely encouraged. Any communi- 
cations or notices must be received at the Collegian 
office before 9 o'clock. Monday evening. Phone 132-W 



IQ36 Member 1937 

ftssocierfed Golle6iate Press 

Distributors of 

Colle6iateDi6est 



ANYWAY, HE WAS THERE 

A profosHor lit n certain Noulhern 

college wanted nil hi* ukmh m H to 
UUWH "here " instead of "pres- 
ent" when In* culled the roll. One 

student always insisted on an- 
swering "preaent" when he heard 
his name, ninth to the displeasure 
of the prof. One day the prof was 
in an ill humor. He tailed the 
roll and fcot the tlass-antitipated 
reply of "present" from the in- 
sistent student. 

"Present, hell," shouted the 
prof, "you're here just like the 

rest of us." 

— Swiped 

That Christmas Spirit 

If any of the fraternity brethren 
or sorority sistern feel like hewing 
down a Christmas tree or two we 
caution them not to take advan- 
tage of the trees planted uptown 
along the sidewalks. Seems that 
last year a few of the boys in 
holiday spirit felt sorry for the 
trees because they weren't lighted 
up, too. So with reckless abandon 
they went about lopping down the 
trees until the Chief of Blue-Boys 
slapped them into the Bastille. 
What price glory is five bucks. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday, Dec. S 

7:<K)p.m. I'red-Med Clul>. til House 
7:30 p.m. Band, Ml 111 111 Building 
Friday, Dec. 4 

7:30 p.m. Dancing Class. Memorial Hall 
!l:im p.m. Military Ball. Drill Hall 
Saturday, Dec. 5 

Closed dates — sororities 
Sunday, Dec. 6 

.1:00 p.m. Yespcrj, Memorial Hall, Prof. 
Harry N. Glick, M.S.C. 
Monday, Dec. 7 

4 ::{.". p.m. Abel Mil 0W \t undharmonika, 
Amherst Theatre 
Tuesday, Dec. 8 

7 :00 p.m. Outing Club meeting, En-nth Hall 
7:00 p.m. International Relations Club, 114. 

Stockbridge Hall 
7:30 p.m. Bacteriology Club 
Wednesday, Dec. 9 

7:30 p.m. 4-H Club. Farley Club House 
7:30 p.m. Radio Club, Physics Building 
Faculty Whist Party, Phi Sigma Kappa 
7:00 p.m. Math Club. Math Building 
Thursday, Dec. 10 
1 1 KK) a.m. Convocation. Walter S. Young. 
Supt. of Schools. Worcester. Mass. 
4:00 p.m. Press Club, News Service 
7:30 p.m. Band rehearsal, Mem. Building 
8:00 p.m. Women s Glee Club. Stockbridge 



Stockbridqe 



Ixtse Einale 

The Stockbridge footballers dkttti 
their season with a loss to a strong! 
Cushing Academy team. This loJ 
terminated a season spotted with barjl 
breaks. Stockbridge won only two] 
games, one from Nichols Junior Col. J 
lege and the other from WilliMor 
Academy. They were defeated byl 
close margins in three games and werJ 
fought to a scoreless tie by a surf 
prisingly strong Vermont team. 

About twenty members of the tHarjl 
are slated to receive letters. 




Harriers Win 

The cross-country team finished 
their second undefeated season with 
an impressive win over the Cushinj 
Academy and Fitchburg State Teach- 
ers College teams on the M.S.C 
course. "Bud" Hammond finishec 
first with Bearce, Mackie, Bartlett 
and Leland finishing close enough tc 
win easily. About eighteen member* 
of the squad will receive letters. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post 
Office Accepted tor mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917. 
authorized August 20. 1918. 



Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North Street. 
Northampton. Mass. Telephone 554. 



REPRESENTED FOB NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 

420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

CHICr.O • BOSTON - SAN FRANCISCO 

LOSANOEI.CS • PORTLAND . SEATTLS 



EDITORIAL 



THE DICTIONARY IS NOT 
A LEAN BOOK 

New heights of industry at 
M.S.C. One of the latest signs 
to appear in Cioodell Library gives 
us the following adviee — 

"Please do not lean on the 
dictionary. The pages tear easily." 



Band Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal of the 
Band will be held tonight, Thursday, 
at 7:30 in the Memorial Building. 
Notice that rehearsal time has been 
changed back to 7:30, and it will re- 
main thus for the remainder of the 
semester. All men who did not play 
in the Band during the football season 
because of participation in athletics 
and who wish to play with the concert 
section of the Band are earnestly 
urged to come tonight. 



Kolony Klub 

Bill Burnham, president, bagged 
175 lb. doe at his home in Vermont 
during the vacation. 

K.K. announces a house dance t. 
be held Saturday, Dec. 12, at 8 o'clock 
Donald Mercer is the chairman f« 
the affair. 



THE CAT FIGHT AGAIN 

Sorority rushing is now official. The girls have come out into the 
open dressed in their best finery and their best smiles and any other 
attributes they can muster up to advertise their groups And the 
freshman co-eds are, as usual, a bit flattered and probably a bit 

PU Aft e e d r the round-up next Sunday things will begin to get back 
to normal. Depending on the outcome of course, the sororities 
will attempt to get back into a normal existence We sincerely 
hope thatch sorority will be satisfied, but then, they never are. 

For the enlightenment of the freshmen who will pledge sororities 
we should like to restate something appearing in an earlier editorial. 

It is the opinion of the Collegian that sorority rushing is little 
more than a backbiting fiasco. It hasn't been nearly so bad this 
year, but it's no secret that degrading rushing comment has been 

Pa iTis tTe^opinio^nfthe Collegian that sororities should be chosen 
for their naturalness and that every attempt at showing off should 
be considered a black mark against the perpetrating group. This, 
to our mind, is of the highest importance when sororities are esti- 

m W^should like to restate our attitude as to whether or not fresh- 
men should pledge. We believe that sorority membership is an as- 
s^to a co-ed's social life. Being a co-educational institution, social 
life is important. As to the other advantages or disadvantages we 

kl 0ne 'thing that might be mentioned as complimentary to the 
sororities and their rushing system ,however, is the matter of pre- 
ferent albidding. Here the sororities have it over the fraternities 
and it is possible that the latter will institute the preferential sys- 

^Thtedi^riaSgone well into the lecturing stage. It might be 
W el to mention that both this and the previous editorial were re- 
quested by both alumni and undergraduate sorority members.^ And 
the purpose of the lecture has been to rill a stated need, not to stir 
up cc n.ment or to push a certain group. 



Sophomore* Attention 

All sophomores interested in trying 
out for assistant manager of the 
Roister Doistere see either Professor 
Rand or Jack Dobby. 



A.T.G. 

Alpha Tau Gamma plans a "vie 
party for Saturday, Dec. 12. Elms 
Smith is in charge. 

This week winds up the initiatiot 
ceremonies with a trip to Northamp 
ton for a final paddling and a hikt 
from an unknown spot. 



A COLLEGE SYMBOL 

Appearing elsewhere in the Collegian this week is an announce- 
ment^ contest for the choosing of a college BymboL SponBor«l 
by President Baker, the contest appears to us as IU1 •^"•11 de- 
serving the earnest consideration of the entire student ^ 

Psychologists tell us that most persons possess visual memory. 
thtis memory of things seen, of configurations and pictures no- 
S in miTch higher decree than ^^J^^^iLfSS^ 
things beard about. Manufacturers and industrial firms * or years 
h,ve recogn /ed his very prevalent trait of human beings and h^e 
snentTr us andfi to 1 uilri up a symbol, a pictumat.on, which shall 
be doielv "rd favorably associated with the name and aims of 
their 1 USinesS in the mind of the average man. imnnmtwi 

This co rece can well follow this example and WI^UtlMWOrninj 
unduly «Vt oninVious al out it. develop a symbol which shall stand 

*lMi tl a^Pr^de^t Baker^hM done a wise ,hing in allowing 

attitude tow; rd the college. , picture will 

Artiste abiUty is not necessary. A roujjh -ken « pitur 
do Lei's give he college a symbol, end a g <><! one, too. 



CO-ED NOTES 

Women, women, women. They 
aren't satisfied with wearing ski-pants 
and living in Draper or the Abbey. 
No. They must invade man's citadel, 
the Collegian office, where once jokes 
that Reinaerd never printed could be 
swapped without first looking fur- 
tively under the editor's desk. 

All of which reminds us of some 
of the instructions handed out to the 
sisters by a sorority chapter down in 
Texas: 

1. Girls will please wear both 
stockings when entertaining gentlemen 
callers except on Sundays and holidays. 

2. Girls are absolutely forbidden to 
date ditch-diggers, college boys, or 
other riff-raff. 

Campus Conspiracy 
At a northern university some 
smart students pulled a trick, which 
no doubt has caused considerable 
embarrassment for the school authori- 
ties. One of the professors found his 
class to be 100', present the first day. 
One of the boys found it inconvenient 
to be present at the next session of 
the class, so a friend answered for 
him when his name was called. At 
the next session he was again absent, 
hut his friend stood by him and 
answered for him again. 

Due to a change in program the 
fellow finally dropped the course. His 
friend who had been answering for 
him conferred with another student 
and they evolved a plot whereby one 
or the other of them responded to 
the ex-classmate's name every time 
roll was cheeked. When examination 
time came, the two conspirators 
managed to write an extra eopy and 
hand it in under the signature of the 
pseudo-student. At the end of the 
semester this young man received a 
"B" in a four credit course which he 
had never taken. 



Math Club 

There will be a meeting of the 
Math Club next Wednesday evening 
between 7 and 8 o'clock. Student 
speakers include C. E. French '38, and 
P. H. Haskins '38 who will present 
papers on angle trisection, and H. V. 
Couper '38 who will speak on an 
Continued on Page 6 



Editor Chosen 

Professor Barrett has made publicl 
the finding of his committee on tht| 
selection of an editor for this year's 
Shorthorn. Arnie Aho has been selecl 
ted and will choose his staff in j 
near future. 

Hort. Clnh 

The Stockbridge Horticultural Cli 
will hold its bi-monthly meeting oil 
Thursday evening at 7:30 p.m. it 
Wilder Hall. Professor Arthur PI 
Continued on PaR(9 



OBITUARY 

We had a peachy column this 
week with everything in it that :\ 
columnshoaldhave (except possibly 
Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck 
;uid then the editor walked in 
attd cut il (o ribbons. 

Ashes to ashes 

Dust to dust; 

If lli- managing editor 
doesn't <'ut it 

Then the editor mitt*. 



PARDON MK FOR MKNTIOMNCi IT 

So you've got another girl friend? 

Oh, I see — 

You can't help it 

If she loves you 

Fervently? 

Oh, you met her in the summer 

'Neath a torrid smouldering moon? 

And unless I watch my manners 

You may leave me very soon? 

Oh, she sends you nuts and candy 

Every week? 

And the limousine 

She's driving 

Leaves you weak? 

And she tells you very often 

That she'd make a perfect wife; 

That you two would he in heaven 

And she'd love you all her life? 

So you think you're fascinating? 

Let me see 

Then she's seen you 

In the morning 

Doubtlessly? 

Has she Men you in the winter? 

If I ask would I he bold? 

Does she know your disposition 

When your feet are wet and cold? 

Have you ever acted sleepy 
When she's gay? 
Has she learned to 
Lend her shoulder 
Stead of play? 

Does she know you want a typist 
And a person who can cook? 
Think she'll like to sew on buttons 
And spend her evenings with a book? 

Does she think that she can tell you 
Where to go? 
And that you will 
( live up poker 

For a show'.' 

It she dors, she doesn't know you 
And you'd better put her wise 
Maybe she'd prefer a couple 
Other fascinating guys! 

Contributed 




SPORTS 




LEFTY' BARR ELECTED 

FOOTBALL CAPTAIN 



Unanimously elected yesterday, 
|,!iv" Barr, outstanding player on 
1 ;,..! year's basketball team, will cap- 
lain the 1936-37 quintet. The election 
which was held late yesterday after- 
n ,„,n, was postponed last winter on 
,),, request of former coach Me. 
Taube, before he left to assume his 
duties at Purdue. 

Barr was named yesterday after an 
election called by Coach Bill Frigard, 
,n which all basketball lettermen 
participated. "Lefty" plays forward 
position on the team, and was the 
t nding player last year. 

Besides his high scoring perform- 

,n,is on the basketball court, Barr 

I also played first string on the Caraway 

Bine last spring. He played right field. 

In his sophomore year Barr was 

| elected a member of the Soph-Senior 

H«,p Committee. He is at present 

Lieutenant Master of Alpha Epsilon 

pi fraternity. 



Frosh Swimmers 
Lead '39 Rivals 



TUFTS 13 M.S.C. 



Taking their second victory against 
I their sophomore rivals, the freshman 
|Kwi miners outswam the class of '39, 
U2-33, last Tuesday evening in the 
linten lass meet held in the pool. 
■Earlier in the season the frosh downed 
Itlieir upperclass opponents 13-7 on 
1 1 he gridiron, but lost the soccer meet. 
The strong freshman team, led by 
IRoy Morse and paced by George 
Iritis, outswam the sophomores in the 
■annual interclass meet. The fresh- 
Iman team, made up of Morse, Pitts, 
■Wat son, Hall, Strobbie, Barnard, Hop- 
Ikins. Washburn, Clark, and Atwater, 
showed promise of good varsity ma- 
terial next year. 

The outstanding event of the night 
ime when George Pitts '40 set a new 
pool record in the 100-yd. free style. 
[His time was 55.5 seconds. In the 
living events, Henry Salmela com- 
nletely outclassed Red Watson. 



STATESMEN IN 
HOOP "CLINIC" 



Exhibiting the vital points of basket- 
ball, Chuck Taylor, former profession- 
al star with the New York Celtics, 
conducted a basketball clinic, Mon- 
day, in the Physical Education build- 
ing before a crowd of 400 high school 
coaches, players and fans. 

Using members of the State varsity 
squad to illustrate his points, Taylor 
stressed a fast passing game and 
simple formations as the formula of 
winning basketball. He urged fast 
passes at a 45-degree angle and 
warned against dangerous cross-court 
passing. He demonstrated the little- 
used "roll-pass" and "blocking plays" 
advising that it is essential to "have 
a purpose when you move or pass." 

High-scoring "Lefty" Barr, Fresh- 
man Coach Lou Bush, Carl Bokina, 
Frank Southwick, Fred Sievers, and 
Ed Czelusniak were among Coach 
Frigard 's charges that aided in the 
demonstration. In the short scrim- 
mage under the basket, Taylor showed 
his ability to retain the ball by clever 
weaving and pivoting. He gained 
frequent applause from the spectators 
for the manner in which he was able 
to feint the State players out of posi- 
tion, pass over their heads or through 
their legs. 

Started five years ago as an adver- 
tising scheme, the clinic has developed 
into a much-sought traveling coaching 
school. It has been staged in every 
section of the country and is, at the 
present tim 1 ?, making an extended 
eastern trip. 

The hardest task Taylor faces in 
demonstrating the technique of the 
hoogp ame is taking the basketball 
players he is given for the day and 
having them carry out the exhibit 
with him. Unless the players can 
quickly understand the fundamentals 
Taylor wishes to point out, the tactics 
are not understood by the spectators. 




Ringing down the curtain on a 
tragic football season, the Statesmen 
fell, 13-0, before their Jumbo oppon- 
ents in the Oval at Medford. A crowd 
of over 5000 witnessed this last State 
defeat, which saw Tufts scoring twice 
after a bad pass from center and later 
after a 76-yard run by Spaeth. 



AGGIE I'iimi 

Continued from Page 1 

I'nrnly Freshmen 

In 1926, again, a very unruly fresh- 
man class invaded the campus. They 
had the audacity to vote to burn their 
freshman caps early in the year. The 
three upper classes decided something 
should be done. The recent edict, how- 
ever, forbade an old fashioned pond 
party. So every member of the class 
was forced to walk through the pond in 
whatever clothes they happened to 
have on. Many best suits were ruined 
that day. 

A favorite prank was, and is, to set 
some object afloat on the pond's sur- 
face. Usually a raft is anchored well 
out of reach, and upon the raft are 
placed various objects which may 
have been missing from the college 
authorities for days. A few years ago 
a large wooden horse was set afloat. 
In 1900 a circus vehicle, from a show 
playing in town, was immersed in the 
pond. 

Fraternity initiation ceremonies of- 
ten make use of the pond, as in 1927 
when a freshman was made to measure 
the circumference of the pond with a 
six-inch ruler. The process naturally 
included a familiar position known 
as "Assume the angle" and which 
encouraged various assaults upon 
the poor freshman's dignity. 

(ictm- on Viiiiie Pond 

About twelve years ago the pond 
was inhabited by a flock of geese. One 
day every last goose disappeared. And 
later that same day three sick sopho- 
mores registered at the infirmary. The 
evidence, however, was strictly cir- 
cumstantial; no geese ever showed up 
again. 

But apparently the days of rough 
and ready pranks, of exciting adven- 
ture, and of work for the grounds de- 
partment are over. Today the old 
college pond lies unruffled and undis- 
turbed in the center of the campus. Its 
having it's first rest since it was 
built in 1893. But one never knows. 



HOCKEY AND HOOP MEN 
PRACTICE THIS WEEK 



SCHEDULE FOR 
WINTER TRACK 



The winter track squad started 
(raining last Monday in preparation 
for their practically completed sche- 
dule. The entire squad, including many 
verterans has not all turned out as yet. 

Last year, of course, the flood and 
the bousing of refugees in the cage cut 
short the varsity schedule. However, 
last year's team comprised a fine rec- 
ord, winning their first initial meet in 
many years from W.P.L, 43-29. In 
their other duel meet of the season at 
Medford, State finished second to 
Tufts over Worcester Tech. 

The only serious loss by graduation 
was Captain Kennett who scored 
three firsts in the high jump last sea- 
son. All of last year's other high scorers 
will be out again this year. They in- 
clude McGowan who was undefeated 
in the broad jump, Dobby and Captain 
Thacker who set new records in the 
600-yard and 300-yard dashes respec- 
tively, I^eighton who set a new record 
in the 80-yard dash, and Lapham in 
the shot-put. Last year's mile relay 
team, composed of Guenard, Thacker, 
Dobby, and Whittmore, which took 
second place in the 1936 B.A.A. meet, 
has been left intact by graduation. 

The tentative schedule for the year 
reads: 
Jan. 30 K. of C. meet at Boston 

Garden 
Feb. 13 B.A.A. meet at Boston Gar- 
den 
18 Conn. State at M.S.C. 
27 Tufts and W.P.L at M.S.C. 
Mar. 6 Wesleyan at Middletown 
13 open 



DR. ^JOL A 

)0;EPK P. WIDNEY 

HAS WRITTEN 9 BOOKf AND 
VTEMOy TO WRITE AT LEAST 4 MORE/ 
E vVA9 AN EARLY PRESIDENT OF THE 
RSTTY OF SO. CALIFORNIA AND 
FOUNDER OF THE SCHOOL OF 
:.INE. HE 5TILL PREFER? AM OIL 
' ' ' LAMP TO ELECTRICITY ' ' ' 



/ 1 




►rS**^ 3 *** 5 ^- 



C°uEcoCT OF ARTi' AND INI 
'^M ACTUAL 1.000 OOO A 
IHE MN6 RANCH- LAP-lCv 



'PAL? 
■■ 30&- 
N US'. 



.rrt.'flf* III 

©■ AiuviiiirJ Culltgwn P't" -_M"'I"'m; 




STUDENTS AT THE UNIV- 
ERSITY OF WASHINGTON 

ARE GIVEN A 10 DAY JAIL 
SENTENCE IF THEY ARE 

CAUGHT PLAYING FOOTBALL 
IN THE .STREETS.' 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Dec. 17 Middlebury at home 

M.I.T. away 

Williams away 

Conn. State at home 

Amherst at home 

Wesleyan at home 

Boston University at home 

ILL State away 

Norwich at home 

Springfield away 

Amherst away 

('oast Guard at home 

Worcester Tech at home 

Tufts away 



Dec. 


18 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


16 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


23 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


24 


Mar 


3 



The winter sports campaign got 
under way thifl week when the basket- 
ball candidates reported to Coach 
Frigard last Monday and the hockey 
aspirants to Coach Ball on Tuesday. 
If the number of experienced men and 
returning lettermen be a criterion of 
judgment l>oth teams are in for suc- 
cessful seasons. In both squads the re 
tiring captains were the only starters 
that were lost by graduation 

With the weather conditions favor- 
able, the hockey team can get off to a 
flying start Coach Hall plans to take 
advantage of the elements and make 
the practice sessions as intensive as 
possible, so that he can get a line on t he 
new players and develop some smooth 
working combinations by the time 
the team continues their holiday prac- 
tices at Stoneham. There are six return 
ing lettermen: Captain Al Ingalls, 
goalie; Dave Rossi ter, defense man; 
and forwards Mildram, Lavrakas, 
Towle, and Linden. Hill Hullock, in- 
eligible last year, will offer heavy com- 
petition for one of the forward posi- 
tions. Cliff Morey, goalie, is outstand- 
ing among the oncoming sophomores. 
In basketball newly appointed Coach 
Frigard is faced with the difficult task 
of molding a team largely from the vet- 
erans who lost ten and won but two 
games last season. With nine letter- 
men and seven promising sophomores 
as a nucleus Frigard still is none too 
optimistic. At this writing the squad 
has had two try-outs. The returning 
lettermen are forwards Harr, Mosely, 
Czelusniak, and Riel; centers Mc-ally 
and Bokina; and guards Bush. Putnam 
and Sievers. Veterans Riley, Slesinski, 
and Rustigian and sophomores South- 
wick, Zelazo, Barrett, Galvin, Phelps, 
Glick, and Kldridge are the other out- 
standing candidates. 
The schedules: 

Hockey 
Jan. 6 Union 
Jan. 9 Army 
Jan. 11 M.I.T. 
Jan. 14 Northeastern 
Jan. 16 Hamilton 
Jan. 18 New Hampshire 
Jan. 21 Amherst 
Jan. 23 Middlebury 



at 



home 
away 
at home 
away 
away 
at home 
away 
away 



Kappa Sigma jumped into a tie for 
interfraternity sports honors with 
Theta Chi by trimming Alpha Kpsilon 
Phi 7 to 6 just before Thanksgiving 
in a fast soccer game which wound up 
the fall competition. 



Collegian Finds Former College Mascot 
But Prudence Is Lost Again - Info Wanted 



A T Wilson W. E. Londergan 

THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 

Te M (»ne 554 Northampton, Maw. 



Once more the Military department 
came through for us in ressurecting a 
forgotten State mascot. What with 
all the talk of "manufacturing" a 
mascot for the college a few weeks 
ago, everyone including your sports 
editor, seems to have forgotten that 
there was once a mascot on campus. 

But this week we received word from 
Sergeant Warren that a bone fide 
State mascot had been found but was 
at present lost! Perhaps a bit para- 
doxical but true nevertheless. Pru- 
dence, who ought to be fully ten 
years old is at present missing! 

Doing a little private sleuthing we 
uncovered a number of facts about 
Prudence which ought to endear her 
to all military men, if not to all loyal 
Statesmen eager to preserve the tra- 
dition of old Hay State. Prudence, or 
rather the ghost of Prudence was last 
seen on the State campus during the 
winter of 1934, when the present 
juniors were mere frosh. At that 
time she was seen apparently seeking 
shelter on the island in the pond from 
the cold wintry blasts coming down 
from the north. 



The story of Prudence's life is a ' 
long and varied one. For several 
years, Prudence, who was, incident- 
ally, at first a wooden polo practice 
horse used by the cavalry unit on 
campus, led a hard dreary existence 
with the military men here, especially 
with "Cowboy" Smith. Hut with the 
passage of time and the inevitable 
changes that come about, things hap- 
pened. And finally in 1933, appreci- 
ating all the fun they had had with 
Prudence, and wishing to preserve a 
college tradition the graduating class 
formally presented what was by that 
time the Ghost of Prudence to the 
freshmen. The ceremony occurred on 
June f>, 1933. A newspaper account 
of the day describes what happened. 

"The exercises included a prolonged 
ringing of the chapel bell, a parade of 
about 180 to South College Field (the 
site of the present Goodell Library;, 
a bonfire, singing, and yelling. Costas 
Cartagianis of Dracut, a senior, made 
the presentation, and John W. Stewart 
of Need barn, president of the fresh- 
man class, accepted in behalf of the 
class. John T. Muller of Holyoke, a 



sophomore cheer leader led by singing." 

In 1929 when the seniors men- 
tioned above were freshmen. Prudence 
disappeared, and had a varied ex- 
perience between '29 and '33. She 
spent a year in North Amherst as a 
hobby horse for some children, an- 
other year on the roof of the Memorial 
Building, and then some time in the 
college pond. In 1931 she again made 
a resting place out in the pond, but 
on this last occasion she made only a 
three day stand. 

It was planned at the time of the 
presentation in '33 to have the wooden 
horse presented to the freshmen each 
year by their class rivals, the sopho- 
mores. The annual affair which was 
to take place on the last Sunday of 
the school year before final exams, 
was to mark the end of rivalry be- 
tween the two classes. 

If anyone has any information of 
the whereabouts of Prudence at the 
present time they should bring it to 
the Collegian offic . All information 
will be appreciated. 

P.S. Prudence stands about "14 
hands high." 



TUE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, l>K« EMUEK ft, IW.IH 



Audience Disappointed by 
Spalding, Critic Declares 



ALTERNATE 

LEADS IN 
'JANUARY 16' 



Violinist Appears At First 
Community Concert 

Opening the Aiahenri Community 
Concert series for the 1938-1937 hb- 
son, Albert Spalding, vi<>lini>t, ap- 
peared in Bowker Auditorium on Nov- 
ember 23. 

Mr Spalding, despite his world- 
wide reputation, proved a disappoint- 
ment to many of his listeners, who had 
rrowded the hall for the concert. His 

technique belied the ureat deference 
which has been paid to him. Despite 
his many years on the concert stage 
gQ d his numerous appearances hefore 
critical audiences, Mr. Spalding failed 
to impress his Amherst listeners. 

Time and time again his bow scraped 
„n the violin, and his fingers unneces- 
sarily plucked the strings. 

I- xi.I.mik d Faults 
Mr. Spalding explained after the 
concert the noticeable faults during the 
first half of his program. The violin he 
used was a Stradivarius which he pur- 
chased just last summer, and with 
which he was still unfamiliar. 

It was brought to him while he was 
playing at the Hollywood Bowl in 
Hollywood, California, last summer; 
hut at the time he felt he was unable 
to buy it. On his return to the East, 
however, he stopped off at Chicago 
and made the purchase. 

Despite these errors, Mr. Spalding 
created some very excellent music. The 
Stradivarius and the Grenarius violins 
which were used produced mellow 
notes, and Mr. Spalding thrilled the 
audience several times with the trills. 
His bearing and poise during the con- 
cert created a favorable impression, ac- 
cording to the comments made by the 
listeners during the intermission. 
Leave* Immediately 
Following the concert, a crowd of 
autograph-seekers thronged back- 
stage only to be disappointed. Mr. 
Spalding declined to autograph any 
programs, excusing himself on the 
grounds that he had to catch an imme- 
diate train to Boston and could not 
possibly spare the time. 

At once he proceeded to pull on his 
overshoes and heavy overcoat and 
left the hall within five minutes after 
the termination of the concert. But a 
willing by-stander supplied the follow- 
ing information. Mr. Spalding is an 
ardent devotee to outdoor life. He pur- 
sues the normal activities of the out- 
door man: hunting and fishing. 
An Athlete 
Besides these, he plays a champion- 
ship game of tennis and has acheived 
recognition as an amateur boxer. His 
stature and virility portrayed his de- 
votion to the strenuous life. His tanned 
face gave evidence of his activities in 




COMPARES DONNE 
AND SHAKESPEARE 




LUCILLE MONROE '37 



CONSTANCE FORTIN 39 



MILITARY BALL 

Continued from Page 1 

MiW H.Tiiin- DftMca «f Shukiin; Ralph Gates. 
MiM Ruth Todti t aclet I.t. Robert A. Uieber, 
Mus Mary Cawley. 

Cadet Lt. Rotx-rt Holdsworth. Miss Virginia 
Connor, Kenneth lliKKins, Miss Ruth Hum- 
phreys of Mi Holyoke; Horace Wildes. Miss 
EUiabeth Smith of BridKewaler; Frank South- 
wi.k. Miss Iran Malm; Cadet Sut. Richard 
Towle. Miss Lois M.uomber; George ltaylon, 
Miss Oorothy Brown; Cadet Lt. Frederick 
Whiltemore. Miss Stella Crowell. 

Cadet Lt. RoIm-ii EC Couhig. Miss Priscilla 
Bradford; Cadet Sgt. Norman Blake. Miss 
Marjoue Damon; W. Siiuier Munson, Miss 
Dolores l.esquire of Sprinnl'ield, I'hilip Chase. 
Mis> Dorothy Nichols; Cadet Sat. Cyrus French. 
Miss Dorothy Jenkins. William Howe, Miss 
Conatanoe Fortin; Cadet Lt. John Landers. 
Miss Kleanor Fahev. 

Cadet Lt. Carl Wildner. Miss Marion Gunness; 
David Johnson. Miss Bobby Bass of New Haven. 
William Barrett, Mis- lsabell Ilalllx-ru of Slid- 
burne Falls; < ieorue Benjamin. Miss Alma Griffin; 
EUlMT Halloway. Miss Jane Gvrry of Shelburne 
Falls, Medric Beloin, Miss Lois Frissel of Smith; 
Cadet Sut. Leland Hooker, Miss Frances Rathlxme. 
Cadet Lt. Ernest K. Davis, WIN Klizabeth 
SckOe; Warren Baker, Miss Ann Austin; Rolxrt 
Giaat, Miss Rosamond Burke; Stanley Bozek. 
\l,,s l.m.t Burgess of Holyoke; Robert Cashman. 
Miss Lorraine Martin of Burnham School, Richard 
Power*, Miss Kay Pratt of Shelburne Falls; 
Edward Stawickt Miss Dorothy Rourke; Cadet 

Sgt. William Averv, Miss G.-n.-viev.- Ilallberg of 
Shelburne Falls. 

Cadet Lt. Kingsbury Houghton. Miss Lillian 
Jackson; Joseph Kennedy, Miss Helen Downing. 
Thomas Maguire. Miss Betty Faton; Robert 
Mother, Ml* Virginia HOWO*; Robert Muller. 
Miss Kv.lyn Gould, living Read. Miss Doris 
Dyer; William Cox, Miss Marion Maschin; 
Ptank "Um, Miss Helen McGinnis of Springfield; 
Emen Caw rain Miss Ruth Deroeia. 



PLAY CASTS CHOSEN 

Continued from Page 1 
prisoner will be judged upon the 
grounds of evidence presented. The 
jury, that will decide the verdict, 
will be panelled from the audience. 
The Cast 

The cast for the play is: 

Prison Matron, Barbara S. Phillips 
'38; Bailiff, William J. Collins '38; 
Judge Heath, Harold I. Watts '37; 
District Attorney Flint, John S. Hoar 
'38; His Secretary, Willard O. Foster 

'40. 

Defense Attorney Stevens, Law- 
rence Levinson '38 and Donald W. 
Cadigan '39; His Secretary, Donald 
M. Fowell *39; Clerk, Joseph J. 
Javorski '38; Karen Andre, Constance 
C. Fortin '39 and Lucille A. Monroe 
'37; Dr. Kirkland, William A. Leigh- 
ton, Jr. '37. 

Benito, Frank A. Brox "38; Homer 
Van Fleet, Willard Squier Munson '38; 
Elmer Sweeney, Francis J. Thomas 
'37; Nancy Lee Faulkner, Constance 
C. Fortin '39 and Lucille A. Monroe 
'37; Magda Svenson, Joan R. San- 

nella '39. 

John Graham Whitfield, Lawrence 
Levinson *38 and Donald W. Cadigan 
'39; Jane Chandler, Beryl F. Briggs 
'39; Sigurd Jungquist, Frederick W. 
Goodhue '37; Larry Regan, Robert 
D. MacCurdy '38; Roberta Van 
Rensselaer, Olive F. Norwood '39; 
Stenographer, Barbara J. Strode '38; 
Court Attendant, Ivan R. Cousins '39. 



Speaking in the Fine Arts series on 
Tuesday, Nov. 24, Dr. Maxwell H. 
Goldberg, who conducts the course in 
English literature from Donne to 
Milton, presented a lecture on "Shakes- 
peare, Donne, and the Poetic Realiza- 
tion of Death." 

Link Damne with Shakespeare 
Dr. Goldberg pointed out that, of 
late, Donne's admirers have been 
linking his name with that of Shakes- 
peare. He then went on to consider 
the validity of this linkage, concen- 
trating upon the treatment of death 
by both poets. 

"Almost never," he maintained, "is 
there among the death passages in the 
plays of Shakespeare, that precise 
combination of circumstances and 
qualities which gives us the distinct 
shudder characteristic of Donne." 

Dr. Goldberg discerned the com- 
bination of the following circumstances 
as distinguishing the poetry of Donne: 
(1) an abrupt and startling intersection 
of life and death connotations at their 
extremes; (2) a hard, logical, argu- 
mentative channel-bed for the emo- 
tions; (3) an astringent tightness of 
phrasing; (4) a stubborn angularity 
of phrasing; (5) the electric glow of 
emotion generated at two narrow 
antipodal points; (6) the sense of 
lines of psychological force pulling in 
different directions simultaneously. 
Contrasts Donne with Richter 
Constrasting Donne's attitude to- 
wards death with that of a diffuse 
sentimentalist like Jean Paul Richter, 
the speaker stated: "Donne did not 
supinely languish towards the "white 
kiss of death." Death was rather 
with him a feverish obsession, hound- 
ing him, haunting him, tyranizing 

over him." 

Dr. Goldberg discussed Constance's 
apostrophe to death in King John and 
the death motif in Romeo and Juliet 
as being among the notable passages 
in Shakespeare which invite compari 
son with Donne's death poetry. An- 



tony and Cleopatra, he continual 
moves in the direction of Donne as t< 
quality of thinking, feeling, and -•*. 
preasion. 

Yet, he concluded that, in this play' 
"there is very little verbal realization 
of death"; and thai, where suchF 
realization does occur, it is in manner 
or substance different from the D>»n 
nean mode of realizing death. Like! 
wise, though several of the sonn-uj 
are somewhat suggestive of Don.^ 
they are, nevertheless, basically differ 
ent from the characteristic dealt 
passages in Donne's poetry. 



KK1> CROSS DRIVE 

Continued from Page 1 
contribution of twenty-five cents per 
student. The fraternities and sor.ri 
ties averaged $5.00 each. 

Single memberships were purchased 
by Dr. Hugh P. Baker, 3; Dr. William 
H. Ross, 2; Miss Edna Mae Mac-lion, 
John A. Tuttle '37, Byron Johnson 37 
Shirley Gale '37, David P. Rossiter 
'37, Harold D. Rose '40, Burton Gr<^ 
'40, Class of 1937, Class of 1938. 
Class of 1939, and Class of 1940. 

Student organizations contributing 
were: Stockbridge School of Agrit ul- 
ture, $31.00; Student Senate, $5 00 
Adelphia, $5.00; United Religious 
Council, $3.00; Informal Commit tee 
$2.00; Phi Sigma Kappa, $18.00; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, $7.00; Kappa 
Epsilon, $6.00; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
$7.00; Alpha Epsilon Pi, $2.50; Kappa 
Sigma, $2.00; Q.T.V.. $2.00; Sigma 
Beta Chi, $5.00; Phi Zeta, $6.0C 
Alpha Lambda Mu, $3.00. 




Shows daily 2:30 6:30 8:30 



the natural surroundings about his 
home in the Berkshires. 

Despite his faulty technique, Mr. 
Spalding presented a very enjoyable 
musical concert. Beautiful melodies 
combined with a variable program fur- 
nished a thoroughly enjoyable concert 
to lovers of music. 

J.S. 



COLODNYS 

32 Main St., Northampton 



YOl'R FAVORITE TUNES 

when you want them and as often as you want 
them on the RCA. VICTOR RADIO 
RECORD PLAYER. It is portable and plays 
10 and 12-inch records, and when attached to 
any 60-cycle AC radio, reproduces the record- 
ing through the radio loudspeaker. Can be 
operated at any distance from the radio. 
Price §16.50 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




Mass. State 
students are 
invited to our 
store for the 

latest in 

riding togs 

and 

sportwear. 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

GCANDCNICC'/ 
REST AD CANT 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
Foo<ls and Beverage* 

Dine, Wine and Dance 



Fri.-Sat., I>ee. 4-5 

Jean Arthur Joel McCrea 

in 

"Adventure in 
Manhattan" 

— plus — 
Stuart Erwin in 
ALL AMERICAN CHUMP 

Also: Comedy Musical 



Siiii.-Mon.-Tiic.s., Dee. <>-7-N 

•Constance Bennett Simone Simon 
Loretta Young Janet Gaynor 



in 



^LADIES in LOVE 

And: Musical Pathe New 



" 



STREET AND STONING 
RAGS 

New Styles 
and excellent quality 

miss gutter's Gift Shop 



Wed.-Tliurs., l>ee. 9-10 

kLew Ayres Mary Carlisle 



in 



"Lady Be Careful" 

Claire Trevor in 

"15 Maiden Lane" 

Added: Sports Cartoon News 

Today, Thurs., Dec-. 3 

John Boles, Rosalind Russell i* 

"CRAKi'S WIFE" 
Jones Family in Back to Nature 



FANTASTIC SCENES OF THE 
DESERT IN CAMERA EXHIBIT 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



CHRISTMAS BOOKS 



We stock breeches, ridinfc boots. 
Suede jackets, sweaters for men 

and women. 



STATKS BEAtTIH I. 

MUM 

Massachusetts. MabWi 

Connecticut 

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OMNIBUS VOLUMES 

( 'utitainillK 

Thrn- Comptatc Boots 

Charlie Chan 

Mtgnoa <".. Bberhatl 

Open K.tiw -s-itzi'i 

St. 00 



THE 
BOUNTY TM0LOG1 

Three i» Obs Totsajt 

Mutiny on the Bouim 

Men An.iuist tin- Si- i 

Pili-.iim * Island 

t.von 



JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



THE NATIONAl SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hifch-closwed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



WARM GLOVES 

The largest stock in town. All the way from a fur lined 
to a pair of ski mittens. We recommend Saranac 
Buckskin for all wear. Our prices will interest you. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-five year* 




College Candy Kitchen 



WHEN IP TOWN . . . 

Drop in for a snack or a full course dinner at Sarriss. 
A distinctive restaurant of unexcelled standards. 



Fantastic scenes of the desert 

icterize the present exhibit of the 

\ t : lierst Camera Club in Goodell 

Library i » collection which comes 

from Pasadena, California. 

Giant's Playground, in feature posi- 
tion, is typical of the group, showing 
, ijffs and sandy waste, with rocks 
(vtrt-wn about like so many blocks. 
Several photographs make use of a 
striking theme, the silhouette of a 
I cactus against a background of cloud 
;,nd sky. Such are Desert Solitude, 
Deteri Candelabrum, Giant, and Old 
,\n,ona. 

Wind Blown and Wind Work depict 
I curious patterns on the sand. Desert 
Hoed is another example of what the 
camera can do with a common-place 
subject, in this case the ruts and 
ridges of a dusty desert trail. 

The stiff, sabrelike leaves of Spanish 
hnyonet are represented by A Pair of 
J ( . Kind. Thru the Palms portrays a 
■graceful group of trees. Desert's 
Jitning is a lovely picture of sun- 
Irise <>n the hills seen through a dark 
[frame of foliage. 

Storm Over the Vallentos is a dra- 
■matic picture of mountains topped by 
{thunderclouds. In contrast Evening 
J has a spirit of tranquility with sand 
Idunt-s cf the desert seen through a 
tduskv light. 



Jthograph Series 
at Art Exhibition 



Announce Name of 
Fine Arts Speakers 



An unusually fine collection of 
lithographs by Albert W. Barker and 
h 'nomas Handforth was placed on 
iisplay at Memorial Hall, as another 
\n the winter series of Fine Arts 
"ouncil exhibitions arranged by Prof. 
•'rank A. Waugh, head of the depart- 
ment of landscape architecture. 
Here Until l»th 
The present collection is ooaned to 
\\w college through the courtesy of 
Mr Charles Whitmore of Hingham 
t 'enter. The exhibition will be open 
Lo the public daily until Dec. 19. 



'ATTERS0N CLUB 
PICKS NEW PLAY 



On Tuesday afternoon, December 8, 
at 4:30 in the Memorial Building, the 
Fine Arts Council will present Mr. 
Franklin Williams of the Amherst 
College faculty. He will speak on the 
Giotto Frescos painted on the interior 
of the chapel of Enrico Scrovegno at 
Padua in 1304 and 1305, illustrating 
events in the mind of the Virgin 
Mary and her parents leading to the 
birth of Christ. They are to be pre- 
sented in living pictures by the 
Amherst Masquers in College Hall on 
December 15 and 16. 



ROBERTSON TRACES 
EVOLUTION OF ART 
IN FINE ARTS TALK 



Discussing the development of mod- 
ern French painting, Mr. James 
Robertson of the Landscape Architec- 
ture department spoke last Tuesday 
afternoon on this week's program of 
the Fine Arts series. 

I Must rules 

Illustrating his talk with repro- 
ductions of the work of various 
painters, he traced the evolution of 
French art from the founding of the 
French Academy in the eighteenth 
century. He related how classicism 
gave way to romanticism, realism, 
impressionism, and finally post-im- 
pressionism. 

Mr. Robertson dwelt on the work 
of Cezanne, whom he described as 
most responsible for the development 
of modern art. Cezanne, he said, was 
a mediocre draftsman but a good 
£olorist. He studied painting at Paris 
where his work was laughed at and 
returned to his native Provence to 
paint and experiment. 



for presentation sometime during the 
winter. However, no definite action 
was taken. Following the reading of 
Outward Bound, a social hour took 
place, and refreshments were served. 

The officers of the society are: 
president, Dr. Ernest J. Radcliffe; 
secretary-treasurer, Mrs. Radcliffe; 
and director, Mr. Alan Chadwick. 



The play, Outward Bound, by Sutton 

ranc. was read at the meeting of the 

'atterson Players, faculty dramatic 

paociatiOB, in the Faculty Club 

i on the evening of Dec. 1. 

Tin' group discussed a number of 
layi lor the purpose of choosing one 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 
By Expert Barbers 
frth Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



MEET AT 



BARSuOmTS CAPE 



BALLANTINES ALE 



HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 



Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



CHRISTMAS SUGGESTIONS 

I'-ii .m.i l'cmil Beta, . . Desk Seta. . . Ptayini I .ml* and other Bridge Aece 

• i .uici S[idi;ii ( olliiii Stationery, . . Booin tor IHuptt "i aH Asai -i"<l Interaat* 
Iro skat,-- .hi I othet Athletic Equipment. 



A.J. Hastings 



NKU SUK.M.KK and 
STATIONER 



17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
A tailed for and delivered Telephone 828 



Here the 12th 




SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE TO BE 
HELD AT CONNECTICUT STATE 



German Film to be 
Shown December 14 



"Abel Met Der Mundbarmonika" 
is to be the fourth in the series of 
Cerman movies being prt'Hented v.nh 
Monday afternoon at the Amherst 
Theatre under the sponsorship of the 
department of German. Literally, 
"Abel with the Mouth Harmonica," 
the film is bIho known by the title, 
"A Girl Falls from the Clouds." 

Corinna, the girl in the c-ase, is 
thrown from a balloon by her sweet- 
heart into the arms of Abel. Abel, 
thinking the way clear, tries to catch 
her on the rebound but the original 
sweetheart explains everything and 
Corinna goes back to him. 



...^^Jfis^MV 

SERGE JAROFF 



rith-IIOI II>VY KKGISTKATION 

Continued from Page 1 

mence. In this way they will be able 
to begin their selected courses with- 
out delay after the second semester 
begins. 

In instituting the new plan the ad- 
ministration has also in mind the 
idea of a i>ermanent schedule, al- 
though the idea cannot as yet be put 
into effect. 

Announcement has also been made 
that in the future students taking 
courses in which bus transportation 
is provided will be required to pay 
transportation expenses. 



Don Cossack Chorus 
at Next Social Union 

The second Social Union program 
presents the world famous Don Cos- 
sack Chorus under the direction of 
Serge Jaroff on Saturday, Dec. 12, at 
8 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. This 
choral organization has sung more 
concerts and travelled more miles than 
any other such organization known to 
the musical world. 

On the occasion of their three- 
thousandth anniversary concert held 
in Carnegie Hall last November, 
H.I.H. Grand Duchess Marie pre- 
sented Serge Jaroff, as conductor, with 
an autographed Imperial Russian flag 
which belonged to the late Czar. 
American and Russian military repre- 
sentatives came from every part of 
the United States and Canada to pay 
tribute to this little man and his giant 
Cossacks, who, because of their efforts, 
have preserved in their singing the 
history of a lost race 

In less than fourteen years, Ser^e 
Jaroff and his gianl CaaSftdOl have 
presented 3000 concerts thus making 
an unparalleled record. 



On April 24, Connecticut State 
College will be host to ten Connecticut 
Valley colleges including Mass. State 
at the eighth annual Student Scien 
litic Conference, it was announced 
today by P. L. Richards "M, chairman 
of the M.S.C. group. 

Among the other colleges partici- 
pating will be Dartmouth. Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Connecticut , Am- 
herst, Springfield, Wesleyan. Trinity 
and Williams. 

llrin&M Stucli'iitN I V»getli <-i 
The purpose of the conference is to 
bring into closer contact with each 
other those students of research in the 
various colleges of the Connecticut 
Valley and also to emphasize the im- 
portance of this undergraduate work 
to general public. The conference 
has been an annual fixture for a 
number of years and this is the second 
time Connecticut State has played 
the role of host. 

The meeting will open in the morn- 
ing with a general meeting at which 
some noted scientist will speak. The 
rest of the day will be devoted to a 
series of student talks and demonstra- 
tions in various scientific fields, with 
student original research work being 
particularly stressed. 

Student Talk* Solicited 
The M.S.C. conference committee 
urges all those interested in the 
natural sciences or in psychology to 
consider presenting the results of 
some original work, a new viewpoint 
on known work, or a combination of 
the two, in a talk not to exceed twenty 
minutes. The talks may or may not 
be accompanied by a demonstration 
or exhibit. 



ROOM AND IM>AKI> 
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Rooms: $2.25 per week 

Board: $fi.00 per week 

At Mrs. Webb's on Maker Lane 

In the rear of the Colonial Inn 

Paddles For Sale 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

Complete line of 

COLLKCK SKAL JEWELRY 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

with your name printed free 

?."» for 89c 
2.*> for 1.45 

ORDER NOW 



P^ W'tim 





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A glamorous, distinguished, persuasive perfume is a gift 
that sparkles with gaiety and one that, is as welcome as a 
smile. Make your selection at Well worth's. We have the 
newest odeurs in beautiful, eye-catching containers. 

CHRISTMAS COSMKTH S 

A wide assortment of the most popular preparations in 
beautiful packages that add to their desirability as gifts. 
RICHARD HUDNUT Sets l.io to 10.00 

COTY'S Sets 1.10 to 6.00 

EVENING IN PARIS Sets 1.86 to 7.60 

MAX FACTOR Sets 1.60 to 5.00 

CIGARETTE VANITY CASES 3.50 to 7.60 

COTY'S PERFUME 1.10 to 3.75 

BEAUTIFUL COMPACTS 65c to 10.00 

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Any of the above Christmas (lifts may be reserved fof ■ 

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50 for HUv 
50 for 1..10 



See our samples 



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HYOBONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



6 



T1IE MgjglgTi; CULUHilAN. T.1.BSUAY. UKC KMBKH | ■ ■■»■> 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

Co//ege Outfitter 



SKI HKIL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SKI EQUIPMENT 

We have the correct equipment for skiing. 

Skis, poles, boots, suits, caps, gloves, mittens, etc. 

NORTHLAND SKIS 



AN NOl M ' KM KNTS 

Continued from Page 2 

application to a war time problem of 

an intrinsic property of the hyperbola. 

Outing Club 

The showing of motion pictures 
taken by Professor Barrett of the 1936 
Winter Carnival will be the feature 
of the program following a business 
meeting of the Outing Club, to be 
held Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 7:00 p.m. 
in French Hall. 

Bjictoriolojiy Club 

The next meeting of the Bacteri- 
ology Club will be held Tuesday, 
Dec! 8, at 7:30 p.m., at the home of 
Edward Hawey on Spring Street. The 
speaker will be Dr. Gage. 

Pre-Med Club 

Dr. Radcliffe will speak before the 
Pre-Med club tonight on the subject 
of Health Control on the Campus. 
The meeting will be held at the 4-H 
Club House at 7 p.m. 



The subject is "National Security 
through Isolation, Neutrality or In- 
ternational Cooperation?" AH inter- 
ested are invited to attend this meet- 
ing in the Students Building. 2:30 p.m. 
on Saturday. 

Sigma Xi Lecture 

Dr. Rodney H. True, Director, 
Morris Arboretum, Univ. of Pennsyl- 
vania will speak on "Erosion" a sub- 
ject on which he is an authority. 
Place: Goessmann I^ecture Room. 
Time: Monday, Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. The 
public is invited. 

Inter. -Relations Club 

Professor Packard of the depart- 
ment of History at Amherst College 
will address the International Re- 
lations Club at the meeting on Tues- 
day, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m. in Room 114 
Stockbridge. His topic will be "The 
Present International Situation." 



and vacancies of life'.' What can we 
do in the face of tragedy, of tempta 
tion, of desperation, of ennui," in the 
Memorial Building at 4:30 p.m., on 
Sunday, Dec. 6. 

Kntoiuolo&y Club 

There will be a meeting of the 
Fernald Entomological Club on Thurs- 
day, Dec. 3, at Fernald Hall at 7 p.m. 
Dr. S. W. Bromley '24, of the Bartlett 
Tree Research Laboratory will talk 
on "Insect Pests of Ornamental Trees." 



lio<M»sters Ottl 

The basketball squad has reported 
for practice and a good team should 
result. Three lettermen and several of 
the last year's second team are back. 
Forty men reported and Sid Gould, 
manager, invites all candidates to re- 
port at once. 



STOCKBUIlMiK 

Continued from Page 2 
French will give an illustrated talk on 
plant genetics of some of our native 
plants. Membership cards will be 
issued to members. 



DiKcu.sKion at Smith 

An intercollegiate panel discussion 
sponsored by the Student Christian 
Movement of New England is being 
held at Smith College on Saturday 
afternoon, December 5. Raymond Wy- 
man and Robert Gage will represent 
State in the discussion, with represen- 
tatives of Smith, Brown and Pembroke. 



Chein Club 

There will be a meeting of the 
Chem Club next Thursday evening, 
December 10, 1936, at 7 p.m. in the 
Chemistry Building. Dr. Serex will 
speak on Induced Radioactivity. 

Vespers 

Professor Harry N. Click will speak 
on "Spiritual Hygiene: What are the 
intangible resourses at our command 
which can be tapped to fill the voids 



Seniors Win 

The seniors captured first honors in 
the annual Hat Rush held previously 
to the Thanksgiving vacation. The 
seniors took home 44 hats to the 
freshmen's 33. 



OLD CHAPEL 

Continued from Page 1 

job is to be done as one of the P.W.A. 
projects of Massachusetts. Forty-five 
percent of the money is received from 
the federal government, and the re- 
maining 564 is advanced by the state. 
Select Name 
The question of a name for the new 
structur has arisen, but nothing defi- 

| nite has been suggested. College 

'authorities are enthusiastic over the 
project, remarking that a very fine 
building is assured. 



5. Any student may submit more 
than one suggestion. 

6. Each proposal should be placed 
in a sealed envelope addressed to 
Judges of College Symbol Competition 
and delivered to the Secretary of the 
College not later than 5 o'clock, 
January 15, 1937. 

7. The Committee reserves the 
right to reject all proposals submitted 
should there be none which in their 
judgment represent a reasonably satis- 
factory suggestion. 



Freshman Reception 

The freshman reception, held re- 
cently, was very successful with about 
75 couples attending. The plans for 
the affair were under the very capable 
direction of a committee headed by 
Joe Drago '37. 



COLLEGE SYMIMH. CONTEST 

Continued from Page I 

clearly described as to be readily 

visualized. 

3. Each suggestion submitted should 
be well described and the reasons why 
it is thought appropriate as a college 
symbol should be stated. 

4. No part of the seal of the Com- 
monwealth may be used. 



CLASS RING 

Continued from Page 1 
been engraved in heavy bas-relief. 
In order to combine both a college 
and fraternity ring, provision has been 
made to have the letters of a fraternity 
or sorority encrested on the stone if 
so desired. 

Available in Junior Year 
Rings will be available to students 
the second term of junior year. They 
may be had in two sizes — the large 
military size for men, or a smaller 
size for women. 

The selected design will be placed 
on display in the lobby of Stockbridge 
Hall before the Christmas vacation 
and the finished samples will be on 
display early in January. Orders will 
be taken then. 




When I'm for a thing I'm all for it! 
I like Chesterfields. . . I like 'em a lot 
. . .we all go for 'em around here. 
Chesterfields are milder... and when 
it comes to taste — they're SWELL! 

for the good things 
smoking can give you 



DEAN'S 

SATURDAY 

DEC. 12 




II A 

... • t\ « 



C. Library. 



4- 



(froHppn 




ol. XLVII 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, HKCKMRKR HI. 1936 



No. 11 



hi Zeta Takes Lead 
In Sorority Pledging 



ifty-six Co-eds Pledge 
Sororities to Climax 
Rushing Season; Phi 
Zeta Pledges Twenty 

(-nty six girls pledged sororities 

afternoon in the Memorial 

Juilding ending the freshman sorority 

lushing week. On Wednesday and 

.!;iv evenings open house was 

it and the girls were entertained by 

;f sorority members. 

Rushing was formally closed Satur- 

vening at 10:30 p.m. and at 

I he following day the freshmen 

ited their pledges. 

/.•In led the list with 20 girls, 

i Delta Mu with 12, Sigma 

(eta Chi with 11. Alpha Lambda 

flu with 10, and Sigma Iota with 

I [edges. 

n warn aa follows: 

Phi /..tii 

of 1910 Irraa Malm. Milii- 
I ( Carpenter, Louise Bowman, 

Robbina, Barbara Farnsworth, 
| Jewell, Barbara Little, Lor- 

\ Creeey, Priedlla Archibald, 
l h Howe, Kvelyn Could, Cath- 

\ Leete, Beatrice Wood. Irma 

I Dorothy Morley, Marjorie 

} Katharine Doran, Elisabeth 

Ibr.iTii Jean f'.irpenter, and Frieda 
I 

Lambda Delta Mu 

of 1940 Marjorie Johnson, 

|&rjorie Smith, Loretta Kenny, Myra 

Dorothy Merrill, Virginia 

Base, Helene Pelissier, Katherine 

I Molly Maddocks, and Sylvia 

imell. 

of 1939 Pat Morse. 
of 1938 Barbara Miller. 
Si|>tnii lit- 1 a Chi 
|ClaM of 1940 Betty Bates, Ruth 
Anne Corcoran, Dorothy 
3urke. Virginia Gale, Betty Rey- 
llds Dorothea Smalley, Elizabeth 
kofford, Jacqueline Stewart, and 
Inct ( ampbell. 
|<li - of 1939 Helen Hallas. 

Continued on Page 6 



[ANY ENTRIES IN 
SYMBOL CONTEST 



raking advantage of the offer of 

| 110, $5 and $3 by the college 

; Impropriate symbol for M.S.C., 

student body has responded en- 

1 'i. illy, and suggestions have 

fn pouring into the Secretary's 

I eek. 

Ear as possible, the proposed 
lio-ild relate to the college in 



•Oil 

rtu 

At 
Ur 

of 
lat. 



intimate way. Graduate stud- 
well as undergraduates and 
III of the Stockbridge School of 
are eligible for the con- 
I nines should be in the hands 
rotary of the College not 
o'clock, January 16, 1937. 



lasses Get Low 
Grades Saturday 



>rd t 



I in Irs past, the low marks of the 
">dy will be posted at Dean's 
Saturday, December 12. 
re marks will be posted in 
office and juniors and 
see their marks in the 
( )ffice. Freshman marks 
id in the hands of the 
Ivisers. 



itnan 



MEMBER OF 
FIRST M.S.C. 
CLASS DEAD 

Wilson Tucker 71 
Succumbs at Monson 



Wilson M. Tucker, one of the few 
remaining members of the class of 
1871, the first class to graduate from 
State, died suddenly last Saturday at 
his winter home in Monson, Mass. 

Mr. Tucker, who was 89 years old, 
was for thirty-three years a trustee of 
Monson Academy, and established 
the Wilson M. Tucker prize for public- 
speaking at the Academy. He was 
keenly interested in education and 
served for sometime on the Monson 
school committee. 

Ill Si. -ile l.eui-.lo( in «■ 

He was elected to the State Legis- 
lature in 1885, serving the term of 
1885-86. He also was a member of 
the Kastern Hampden Agricultural 
Society. Mr. Tucker was active in 
the Congregational Church of Monson, 
retaining his membership for 71 years. 
Upon finishing his course at State, he 
joined his father in the conducting of 
an extensive milk business, later 
managing a lumber and real estate 
concern. He prepared at East Hill 
School and Monson Academy. 

Surviving Mr. Tucker is a son, 
George, of Boise, Idaho, and a daughter 
Mrs. Mabel Fitzgerald, of Chicago, 111. 



don cossacks |c ssacks Chorus at 

Social Union Concert 



THE MARCH 



Perry *24, Dies 

Dr. Chauncey Perry '24, died Sun- 
day in Greenfield where he maintained 
an office as a surgeon. While a stud- 
ent at State, the late Dr. Perry 
majored in microbiology and was a 
member of Theta Chi fraternity. He 
prepared for college at Waltham High 
School. In addition to his private 
practice, Dr. Perry was physician for 
Franklin County. 




Choral Group Sponsored by Social Union Saturday 



Formation of 
M.S.C. Flying 
Club Planned 



The possibility of an M.S.C. Flying 
Club to be organized in conjunction 
with the Amherst and Smith College 
clubs as a Tri-College Flying Club 
became assured this week as plans 
were formulated by Thomas Hennes- 
sey '38, the organizer at M.S.C, and 
President Breed of the Amherst Fly- 
ing Club. The purpose of the club is 
not to teach members to fly, although 
those desiring lessons may obtain 
them at a moderate fee, but to boost 
aviation. 

Continued on Page 2 



Christmas Play 
to be Shown in 
Tableaux Form 



Under the direction of Mr. Stratton, 
the Dramatic, Religious, and Musical 
associations will present "A Mystery 
for Christmas," on Wednesday eve- 
ning, Dec. 16, at 8 o'clock. This is a 
mystery play written in the medieval 
manner, and will progress by a series 
of tableaux. 

The group singers in the play have 
not been announced, but the two solo 
parts will be sung by Barbara Keck, 
and James Kerr. The non-singing 
characters will be as follows: Con- 
Continued on Page 5 



D'Ya Wanta Date? Elizabeth Co-ed '38 Advises 

M.S.C. Women in the Art of Getting Their Men 



Ultra-important to each and every 
woman student enrolled at the college 
is the serious business of selecting from 
the rank and file of male students the 
proper companion to brighten up lei- 
sure hours. Indeed, so important does 
this matter seem that the Collegian has 
gone to the trouble of interviewing a 
campus authority on the subject for 
the purpose of getting the process of 
selection down to a workable basis. 
lftH Parte* in 200 O.ivs 

It used to be the opinion about cam- 
pus that it was the men who did the 
picking, but according to Miss Eliza- 
beth Co-ed '38, who has amassed the 
amazing total of 168 dates in 200 days 
of college, (not counting those in the 
daytime), this is not the case. 

Misa Co-ed says that inasmuch as 
there are three fellows for every girl 
at Massachusetts State the woman is 



mistress of the situation, and has the 
opportunity to do nearly as much dis- 
carding as she pleases. 

However, Miss Co-ed opines, in the 
process of selection, each woman 
should be subtle. "Let the man think 
he's doing the picking and all will be 
well," she said. 

When asked how one could be subtle 
in such matters. Miss Co-ed said, "The 
most important thing to remember is 
that you should he near your dream 
man as much M i-* possible without his 
realizing it. Of course, the old drop-the- 
handkerchief method is quite out of 
date, but there is still the opportunity 
for a girl to revise her course of study 
so that all her classes may coincide 
with his. 

Sin* (Uvea All 

"It's true, the girl may experience 
certain difficulties in bringing this 



about, especially if he happens to be 
animal husbandry major, but then, 
HO sacrifice is too great, and the college 
has been cooperating wonderfully well 
by reducing the number of agriculture 
majors " 

"Of course." Miss Co-ed continued, 
"there are the usual methods of dis- 
covering his haunts in the library or 
the Mem Building, and spending all 
your spare time there, or of inviting 
him to sorority vie parties, and so 
forth, especially if they come before 
formals, but I have found the course- 
revision methods much more subtle." 
I'irUiiiij >• Dream .Mini 

"But how is a girl to determine just 
who her dream man is?" Miss Co-ed 
was asked. She refused to answer spe- 
cifically, but stated that if a man could 
make her dream about him and was 
Continued on Page 6 



Program of Russian Music 
to be Presented by Male 
Chorus Saturday Night 
at Social Union 

The Don Cossack Male Chorus 
will present a program of Russian 
music at the second Social Union pro- 
gram of the year on Saturday, Dec. 
1'2, at 8 p.m. in Bowker Auditorium. 

Program In Three Parts 
The program they present is divided 

. into three parts. The first group is 
devoted to church music by Cretch- 
aninoff, Tchaikowsky, and others. 

| The next two groups hold what to 
many are the gems of the program 
the beautiful anil haunting folk melo- 
dies of Russia songs of the Ukraine, 
of the Don, of the monotonous wastes 
of Siberia. 

On every program, whether men- 
tioned or sung as an encore, figures 
the Volga Boat Song. Until one has 
heard these men in their rendering of 
this popular song, one cannot say he 
has really heard it. lake a whisper, 
the doleful cry "Ay-ookhnem" steals 
upon the air. Nearer and nearer the 
sound approaches, then fades again 
into the distance. Such is the drama 
of this song that you seem to see the 
bent forms of the bare footed peasants 
as they trudge along the muddy banks 
of the Volga, dragging the heavy 
barges through the shallow waters. 

Dancing 

The final group of songs leads up 
to a climax of soldier songs, Cossack 
songs punctured with shrill calk, 
barbaric yells and frenzied dancing 
that communicate their thrill to the 
audience. 

STUDENT BALLOT 
TO ELECT QUEEN 

The 1937 Winter Carnival will be 
presided over by a queen to be chosen 
by the student body, Philip D. Layton, 
chairman of the carnival committee, 
announced recently. She will be 
elected by a ballot conducted in co- 
operation with the Collegian some time 
before the Carnival gets under way 
and will be announced at the start of 
the affair. 

At meetings held last Thursday, 
the sophomore and junior classes each 
voted $7o to the support of the 
Winter Carnival, as against $f>0 each 
last year. The juniors also elected 
Norman Blake, Fred Sievers and 
Ruth Wood to serve on the Winter 
Carnival dance committee with Ho- 
ward Steff, Robert Packard, and 
Herbert Click, members of Maroon 
Key who were selected at a meeting 
last week 

Annual Xmas Tree 
Lighted Tomorrow 

The annual college Christmas tree 
will make its colorful appearance on 
the campus Friday, Dec. 11. 

Although the custom in the past 
has been to bring a tree to the campus 
for the Christmas season, this year 
the large pine tree by the chapel tower 
will be decorated. 

As has been the custom in previous 
years, there will be a Christmas Carol 
Sing around the tree on Tuesday 
evening, December 13. 



I 



Copyright 19J6, Liggett & Myirs Tobacco Co. 



THB MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, T..UBSPAV. PECEMBEK ,0. MS 



TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10. 19H« 




•tU4 



/ifcaseaclntVatlP Collegian 

ITo^ Maiwhuittt. State College I'ubluhed every Th ursday by the students . 

Official newspaper of the Massacnurena -w _ __ 

rniTIS A BREAULT *37. Editor-in-chief 




CAMPUS CALENDAR I 



CampuH 
PHILIP B. BHIFF W. K<litor 

RICHARD C DESMOND S» 
JAMES S. WAL.DMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 
MAl'RICE TONKIN '38 
THOMAS J. ENRICHT '39 
MARY T. MBEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 
MABELLE BOOTH :w 
BETTINA HALL "SO 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWK I '40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS '40 
NANCY E LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '40 
SUSAN F. STUTSMAN '40, Secretary 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 
JULIAN H. KAT/EFF 38, Editor 
MAXWELL L KLAYMAN '38 
ALFRED M SWIREN '38 
[OHN E. F1LIOS '40 
ARTHUR A. NOYKS '40 

Make-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '39. Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

StockbritJfte Correspondents 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S"i7 
WESLEY NUTTER S'3S 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL II GOLDBERG 



ADEQUATE 

"The truly perfect torn posit ion" 
lectured ■ profeKHor of Enftlinh »t 
Harvard, "embodi** an »PP«-»> to 
the Imagination, Iuin in it some- 
thing «f religion, and hesides, for 
these modern times, is somewhat 

risque." 

\ numher of compositions Mere 

submitted by the elass, each trying 
to exemplify these salient points. 
The one the professor considered 
the best he read to the class at the 
following lecture. It begin thus: 
» 'My CJod,* said the Duchess, 
'take vour hand off my leg'-" 

— Exchange 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS "37, Business Manager 
Business Assistants 

. . _• - »4—. hjdrv F KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr 

~ ^Trrsor* B cvMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HAKKY r. Jvuun 

CLIFFORD E. SYMAN ^ IAM B FERG USON '38. Subscription Mgr. 

™*oa», •« WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

WILLIAM B. GRAHAM 38 DONALD L SILVERMAN '38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME 38 CHARLES RODDA '39 

ABRAHAM CARP '39 HENRY WYNN 39 
ALLEN GOVE '39 



ONLY ONE HERE 
A censor is a lovely man - 
I know you think so, too; 
He sees three meanings in a joke 

When there are only two! 

—Record 



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Make nil orders payable to Tht UossachustUs 
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wH please "°tify *« busine8S """T, "" i^"^ 
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Sbution. are sincerely encouraged. Any coinmuni- 
cations or notice must be received at J*0*g£ 
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Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post 
Office Accepted tor mailing at specia rate of postage 
P^vUled for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917. 
authorized Au gust 20. 1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Pre*. H2 North Street. 
Northampton. Mass. Telephone 5o4. 



|Q36 Member 1937 

Associated Golle6iate Press 

Distributors of 

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UMmnmnm won national aovsrtis.no .y 

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CDITC-QIAL 



ON CRK1>IT , Thursday in the columns of 

Announcement was ma de la: It T hursday ^ t be 

the Collegian that schedule > for the »gf£g& of two we ek 8 
made out before the ClvratmaB reo en. *or p program which 
undergraduates will be busy trying to hgure ^ s.^^ 

will fit several needs It ™ h £ e ^ n £ p of a minimum number 
not more than ^%^&SSS^cnK and have all 
of courses carrying the required numoeru burden of study j 

required courses and ^±J^^X. vexing problem' 
as light, as possible. Of ^course tnere free afternoon8f 

of making out a W™ w ST a v classes. Program-making 
no eight o'clock* and npSatia^ay ^a« T he college must 
again emphasizes the m ^ ne ed for a change ^ 

Kc^W^^^ ana studies will then be 

n^fi^rgive an 0^™°*?^$^}^** a 

The college requires that o be el gib^^ .g ^^ ^ 

student complete 11 J un, °^ n ":'. re work in his last two years, 
satisfactory freshman and sophomore wort. ^ semes ter. Most 
then, a man must average eighteen creaua ^ 

courses carry three credits. . "^^[of six courses. But, if 
ments. an average program has to consist o | » gtudent 

one of the courses chosen is only a £° ™g£ ™^ se \ n place of a 
has to take a seventh course, or J^^gJ™"^ the follow- 

three-credit one, or ^^^^jS^ufdefidt. Whatever solo- 
ing semester to make «P ^ one ere m**** ^ . g oyer . 

t£^$%™F°?*& ft- h jf ioa P d by seeking a way 

^rexpediency rather .^^^^£3ffi e which is selected 

, T T^^^^^k^J^t the college catalogue 
on v because it tuitius ine ieq u» t b pleas- 

Is hardly consistent with g»«2»£ft {J ™act known to all 
ant fact to educators, but "^S credit cowae goes a long way 
undergraduates, that an ^f^^^e^t-hours. It does not 
toward making up the required exgh teen crea i wQrk of 

really matter -that one is not ^ interested in as many 
the course itself. It is ; re ai ly oin "_ therefore, take anything 

as six courses at one time , ^ffi^Zm itself which is 
To te^de^lored \o rnuch as SUtfL which almost necessitates 

^Tt^rdltuU Jtame . .U ^^ff^SZ SSS 

of escape from six courses. »^°? V S ^ C E v ° e rv student realizes 
graduate to handle six subjects efrectiveiy ave n hig 

that his real interest has in the j two - o three co 
-major field" and it is on ^M •— Tll»i o£ ^ diminish his 
trate. Three or four .^^Wi^R he looks around 
ability to do justice to his W^^g.J^imt of credit and 

pulsory education. He is a college stuciem, ■ » i i ng to 

5f a voluntary wish for educat ton. It v n ^ te Ca use he'will 
force him to take courses which ~ eaeouwa^J a 

learn something 5 from .them ; e ^t^w»S requires a .man to 
few more credits. ^.^W;,;"" s B piri t of credit consciousness, 
take so ^y^^J^^^^Z^ were lowered, under- 
If the collegecred it-houn ^«g^^ urae , w ith better results. 

^uXt^bi^SelSS^ allow a man to choose his 



MODERN PROVERBS 

A bird in the hand is bad table 

manners. 

Success has turned more heads than 

halitosis. 

A fool and his money are some party. 

If you want to remember things, tie a 
string around your finger. If you want 
to forget things, tie a rope around your 

— Ohio Sundial 

MR. CO-EI> 

When boys will be boys, that's 
not news. But when boys will be 
girls that's news. You should 
have seen the boys dancing with 
each other at the social dancing 
clawse This condition was 
brought about by the extreme 
shortage of charming, graceful 
co-eds with poise. 



Thurirtlny, l>ec 10 

7:00 p.m. Chem. Club, Chemis- 
try Building 

7:30 p.m. Band rehearsal, Mem. 
Building 

8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, 
Stockbridge 

Friday, Dec. 11 

Faculty Smoker 
8:00 p.m. Informal, Drill Hall 
Saturday, Dec 12 
Dean's Saturday 
8:00 p.m. Social Union, Bowker 

Aud., Don Cossacks 
8:00 p.m. Vic parties: A.T.G., 
K.K., Lambda Delta Mu, 
Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Sunday, Dec. 13 

5:00 p.m. Vespers, Mem. Build- 
ing, Dr. E. B. Robinson, 
Grace Church, Holyoke 
Monday, Dec. 14 

4-35 p.m. Geschichte aus dem 
Wienenwald, Amherst Theatre 
Tuesday, Dec. 15 

8:00 p.m. Men's Glee Club, 
Memorial Building 
Wednesday, Dec. 16 

Football dinner, Lord Jeff 
7:00 p.m. Radio Club, Physics 
Building 
Thursday, Dec. 1? 

11:00 a.m. Insignia Convocation 
Christmas program, Mr. Williams 




Alpha Tan Gamma 

Two senior members of A.T.G. re. 
ceived their third degree Mon.iay 
evening at the regular meeting. They 
were Donald Baldwin and Georg c 
Trowbridge. 

Plans for the "vie" party being 
held the 12th are now complete ;,nd 
a good crowd is expected. 



Letter men 

At a meeting of the Stockbridg* 
Athletic Association it was decided to j 
award a total of thirty-three letters. 
Of these, twenty-four will be awarded 
to members of the football squad while j 
the remaining nine will go to the 
cross-country squad. 

Those receiving football awards ire. 
H. Acker, H. Andrews, D. Baldwin 
T Boyce, G. Bush, I. Christenson, 
J Drago, E. Hair, F. Tucker, A 
Merino, J. Bauks, C. Whittaker. F 
Fisher, A. Emanuel, B. Jackiczyk. W 
Sanderson, W. Burnham, aU of the 
class of '37. Freshmen receiving! 
letters are: E. Brown, E. F. Fournier 
H. Griffin, E. Helander, R. Lyon, R 
Sparks, and the very efficient manager 
Wilbur Young. 

Cross-country men receiving letters 
are S. Bartlett, J. Broughton, C 
Cummings, S. Eckland, D. Grave* 
Capt. H. Mackie, R. Leland, G 
Trowbridge, Manager Fife, L. Benrce | 
and L. Hammon. . 

These letters will be awarded at| 
some future convocation. 



Band Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal ot 
the Band will be held tonight, Thurs- 
day, at 7:30 in the Memorial Building. 
Concert dates are being lined up, and 
it will be necessary for all men who 
wish to take active part in the concert 
activities of the Band to be present. 



Kolony Klub 

Freshmen have received the I 
half of the first degree of initiation 
and are awaiting the second degree 
which will take place on some futunl 
date on Greenfield Common. A rooc 
crowd is expected and everyone antici-l 
pates a jolly time, especially the| 
seniors. 



STRINGING HIM ALONCi 

An old gentleman riding *"«* 
lop of a WJlnhire bus noticed thai 
,.wrv few minutes the conductor 
would come up from the back and 
dandle a piece of string down be- 
fore Ihe driver underneath. \S here- 
upon the driver would utter pro- 
fnnily terrible to hear. F.nally 
the old lienlleman eould stand it 
„„ longer, and asked the con- 
duetor what was up. 

"Oh." answered the conductor, 
"his father is to be hunii to- 
morrow and I'm just kiddimi h»" 

a little about it." 

Wrst Point Pointer 



"Sir. may I have your daughter for 

my wife?" 

"Bring your wife around and 1 ll 

861* 

Missouri Showme 



TRY THB PRUDENTIAL 

" Helloo. is this Ihe Fidelity Insur- 
ance Company'.'' 
" Yes, madam." 
-Well, I want to arrange to have my 

husband's fidelity insured." 

— Growler 



Vespers, Dec. 13 

There will be the annual Christmas 
Carol Sing with singing of Carols 
after the service around the tree. The 
Rev. Edwin Bradford Robinson of 
Holyoke will speak. 



Psychology Club 

Dr. George MacPherson, head ol 
the Belchertown State School, will 
address the Psychology Club at its 
meeting on December 16 in Room 102 
Stockbridge. 



index Board 

There will be an important meeting 
of the Index board tonight at 7 p.m. 
at the Index office in the Memorial 
Building. All members are required 
to be present. 



Motion Picture Shown 

Professor Rollin H. Barrett of the 
Department of Agricultural Econom- 
ics and Farm Management will pre- 
sent some fascinating motion pictures 
for the Westley Foundation, which 
will hold its weekly meeting Sunday 
at 8 o'clock, at the home of Dr. 
Adrian Lindsey on Mt. Pleasant. 
Those interested are cordially wel- 
come to attend. 



BIBBlMi THK PROFKSSOB 

Wise Prof "And so. students, we 
come to the conclusion that nothing 
is impossible." 

Fresh Frosh "Well, I'd like to see 
you run this umbrella down your 

throat and open it." 

— Mugwump 



Manager of Basketball 

All candidates for assistant mana- 
ger of basketball please report at the 
Cage, at 3:30 this afternoon. 



M.S.C. FLYING CLl B 

Continued from Page 1 

No dues will be charged, and entiitl 
facilities of the Amherst Club, which 
include a Taylor Cub plane, recod 
nized as the safest type of plane u 
the country, will be placed at M 
disposal of M.S.C. students. In til 
dition to ground work at the LaFW 
field in Northampton the club plan 
several social functions. Organtl 
Hennessey hopes to obtain Fran 
Hawks, world famous pilot, M 
speaker during one of the forthcoH 
meetings. 

At present, the club consists 
fifteen students at Amherst Colle 
who have soloed, and fifteen studend 
at Smith College. The Taylor plan 
which is stationed at the La Fie 
airport in Northampton, is the pr 
perty of the Amherst club. Instruct. 
will be given by a registered tnUsfj" 

pilot. 

A campaign for members wil 
conducted during the next few weet 
' It is hoped that all students int. n^: 
will take advantage of the opportune] 
of joining the first flying club ill ' 
history of Mass. State. All four-F 
students are eligible for member* 
The first meeting of the club will! 
held tonight at 7:30 p.m. at thej 
Sigma Kappa house. President Br* 
of the Amherst Fying Club nmII J 
dress the prospective members 
' outline the program. 



POEM OF THE MONTH 



subjects not because of a need 
but because of a desire. It 
would do away with the abusive 
rush to "guts." The whole 
at itude o? course selection 
which has become d^ 8e n d f 
through a malignant growth ot 
too many credits will be cured 
by the reduction in numbers 
and consequent intensification 
of courses. W C G 



SILKNCK 

Swirl 

Of Chrysanthemums 

White-glowing 

In the dawn. . . . 

Dry tears 

On a printed page 

Almost gone. . . . 

Inaudible ashes 

Of souls 

Still warm. . . . 

All these are the silence 

Before the storm. 

By Shirley A. Bliss '38 
Judge: Fredcruk S. Troy 




S PORTS 




53 LETTER AWARDS 

FOR FALL SPORTS 



1 all athletic awards totaling 53 
wire announced this week by Secre- 
tar> Earl Carpenter of the Joint 
( , inmittee on Intercollegiate Ath- 
l,i, <s. Twenty-seven of the letters 
voted State athletes were earned in 
football, 17 in soccer and 9 in cross- 
country. 

Football awards for the 1936 season 
p. (,, Captain David Rossiter who 
played 356 minutes of the eight-game 
schedule, Edward Bernstein who to- 
taled 360 minutes, and Guy Gray 
who played 360 minutes also. Junior 
M ,, rs George Niden, who amassed 
;!7. r . minutes at the fullback post and 
Dick Towle who totaled 328 also rate 
■pedal mention. The only member of 
the class of '39 to earn his letter was 
an end, Clifton Morey. 

Captain Joseph Kennedy heads the 
list of soccer players to receive their 
awards while five sophomores were 
among the chosen few. Larry Pickard, 
sophomore cross-country star, receives 
his first award to head a list of nine 
letter-men including three seniors, four 
juniors and two members of the class 
of 1939. 

The following men received their 
let ten: 

Football 

Class of 1937— Arthur Avery, Ed- 
ward Bernstein, Ernest Davis, Sabin 
Filipkowski, Austin Fisher, Hillel 
Freednsan, Guy Gray, Albert Gricius, 
Forrest Hartin, William Kewer (man- 
ager), Wendell Lapham, Walter Mose- 
ley, George O'Brien, David Rossiter 
(captain). 

Class of 1938 — Herbert Brown, Wil- 
liam Bullock, Charles Collins, Edward 
Czelusniak, Russell Hauck, Norman 
Linden, George Niden Robert Perkins, 
Paul Putnam, William Roberge, Fred- 
erick Sievers, Richard Towle. 

Class of 1939 Clifton Morey. 

Soccer 

Class of 1937 Joseph Kennedy 
captain), Richard Knowlton (man- 
ager), Raymond Conway, I>aurence 
Kyle, Harvey Turner, 

Class of 1938— C. W. Adams, Robert 
Bustle, Vincent Couper, R. Feinburg, 
| Sam Colub, Donald Osley, D. Silver- 
man. 

Class of 1939— George Benjamin, 
Robert Cain, Thomas Lyman, Stanley 
[ Podolsk, Charles Rodda 

CroHs-Country 

(lass of 1937— L. K. Harris, H. J. 
| Simpson, I. B. Whitney (manager). 

Class of 1938 D. W. Beaumont, 
I Ralph Ingram, M. T. Little, M. F. 
| Ne.lame. 

Class of 1939— L. K. Pickard, I. D. 
Reade, Jr. 




State Booters 
Place Fourth 



Fourth place in the Intercollegiate 
Soccer I-eague was taken by the 
Mass. State soccer team with three 
wins and three losses, according to 
final tabulations recently released. 

Teams leading State were: Brown, 
title winner; Wesleyan and Yale, 
tied for second place; and Harvard 
and Dartmouth, tied for third place. 
High scorers for State in the league 
games were Rhodda and Osley, with 
two goals each. 

The Statesmen won two games out- 
side of the League to give them a 
total of five wins and three losses for 
the season. In order, they took 
Worcester Tech 7-4, defeated Conn. 
State 2-1, were outfought by Williams 
3-0, bowed to Yale 2-0, beat Tufts 2-1, 
outplayed Amherst 2-0, took Trinity 
2-0, and closed the season by losing 
to Wesleyan 1-0 in a hard-fought game. 
This season saw the Maroon and 
White initiating a new system of 
offense and defense which proved its 
value. While the team will lose 
several seniors through graduation, 
the presence of many sophomores 
augers well for next year's team. 
Coach Larry Briggs rated this year's 
club as "the best I ever coached, 
though the scores don't prove it." 
The final team standings. 

W t T Pts. 
Brown 6 2 14 

Wesleyan 5 2 10 

Yale 5 2 10 

Harvard 3 2 2 8 

Dartmouth 4 2 8 

Mass. St alt- 3 3 6 

Amherst 2 4 4 

Williams 12 13 

Conn. State 14 2 

Tufts 14 2 

Springfield 2 1 1 

M. I.T. 4 



CORRECTION 

Due to an error in printing last 
week's Collegian, "Lefty" Barr was 
reported elected football captain. 
The headline involved should have 
read " 'Lefty' Barr elected basket- 
ball captain." 



SQUAD CUT TO 16 MEN; 
OPEN HERE NEXT WEEK 



Listen my children and you shall 
hear. . . . 

The annual football banquet is 
going to be held next Wednesday 
night at the Lord Jeff. Present at the 
affair, which is sponsored this year by 
members of the President's Cabinet, 
will be members of the cabinet and 
all football lettermen. If this dinner 
is anything like the one given last 
year by the Alumni, anything is 
likely to happen. 



Grid Schedule 
Is Announced 



Fred Sievers, outstanding lineman 
on this year's football squad, rated 
honorable mention on the AU-Ameri- 
can team picked by Stanley Wood- 
ward, New York News football writer 
and president of the Football Writers' 
Association, for the Sport Pictorial, 
national sporting weekly. 

A junior, Seivers was selected by 
Woodward in conjunction with sixty- 
five of the country's leading coaches, 
professional scouts and sports re- 
porters. 



FRESHMAN TKACK 



Freshman winter track got under 
way last week with 45 candidates 
turning out. The freshman team is 
scheduled for three and possibly four 
meets this season. First in line is an 
interclass meet in January in which 
the two Stockbridge class teams will 
also participate. In February the 
frosh will oppose the Stockbridge 
team. A triangular meet with Stock- 
bridge and the Amherst freshmen is 
scheduled next. 



{Prudence Impostor at M.S.C. 
Location of Mascot Known 



A .inoxpectedly as the idea was 
clever. Prudence, former State mascot 
|wlio bad been missing for several 
years, was reincarnated last Tuesday 
Doming by enterprising students sus- 
>ected of being sophomores. Not only 
I'd the sophs try to reincarnate Pru- 
dence, but alongside the mare there 
[ll >" • peared an offspring. Prudette, 
puppoiied to have been acquired no 
aouht since the horse was last seen 
mi tin Pond two years ago. An in- 
Qfiption on the mother horse, "Pru- 
denr, wasn't Prudent" perhaps ex- 
plains "verything. 

But clever as the idea was to rein- 
pama'. Prudence, the reappearance 
ff '1'' impostor was ill-timed, coming 
fast 01 , ne heej 8 of the sad news that 
rrudj ,. known and beloved by 

ia ny n|. Tits of paBt classes is no 

' After a long life, which com- 

aftj he drudgery of an army horse 



with the romance always attached to 
a disappearing college mascot, the old 
polo training horse has at last passed 
to its final resting place, to join its 
ancestors. At present Prudence is no 
doubt associating with the spirits of 
Black Diamond and other famous 
quadrupeds. At any rate since we 
went to press last in an attempt to 
discover the whereabouts of Prudence 
we have learned from reliable sources 
and an eye witness that Prudence was 
cremated in the college dump follow- 
ing her one day stand out in the 
college pond two years ago. Sad but 
true, dear reader. 

Whether or not the new imprudent 
Prudence and her offspring Prudette, 
can ever replace the tradition of the 
past, can not be known as we write 
this, hut there certainly are possibili- 
ties, sophomores. 



Forty-five freshmen and fourteen 
sophomores were voted numeral 
awards by the interclass athletic 
board at a recent meeting. The 
sophomores won numerals in soccer, 
while the frosh took theirs in football, 
swimming, and cross-country. 

Awards are as follows: sophomores: 
Elliot Wilson, Milton Auerback, 
Charles Branch, Richard Powers, John 
Parker, Gerhard Wilke, Everett Rob- 
erts, Donald Calo, Roger Cole, Law- 
rence Johnson, Francis Farren, Fred- 
erick Goode, William McCowan, Ev- 
erett Kruger. 

Freshmen: football: Vasilis I,av- 
rakas, Charles McLaughlin, James 
Payson, Sidney Zukerman, Daniel 
O'ConneU, Alfred Rudge, John Blasko, 
Joseph Larkin, Carl Kokins, Edwin 
Podolak, Stanley Finik, Robert Stap- 
les, Frank Davis, Donald Mahoney, 
Gerald Dailey, Eric Stahlberg, Win- 
slow Ryan, Malcom Harding, Phillip 
Geoffrion, James King, Leo Statucci, 
Alan Smith, Myron Hager, Warren 
Tappin, managers David Novelli and 
Nathan Winer. 

Cross-country: Edgar Slater, Ar- 
thur Noyes, Sidney Rosen, Kenneth 
Pike, Wilfred Shepardson, Robert 
Kennedy, Francis Wing, Charles 
Gleason, Benjamin Spungin, Sidney 
Lipshires, manager Daniel Shepardson. 
Swimming: Frederick Watson, Roy 
Morse, Robert Hall, Arthur Washburn, 
Vincent Barnard, Harold Stroube, 
George Pitts, George Atwater. 

The numerals will be given out 
next week at the athletic supply room. 
Newly elected officers of the Inter- 
class Athletic Board for 1936-37 are 
as follows: president, Allyn Fisher 
'37; vice-president, Carl Swanson '37; 
secretary, Vincent Schmidt '39. A 
new constitution will be under con- 
sideration when the board meets again 
in February, as the present constitu- 
tion is considered inadequate. 



A nine-game schedule, including a 
proposed night game with the 11. S. 
Coast Guard Academy at New London, 
was announced by Carl Carpenter, 
secretary of the Joint Committee on 
Intercollegiate Athletics. The States- 
men will play four games at home, and 
perhaps a fifth with Amherst, and 
one more opponent than was faced 
this year. 

As an opening opponent, Sept. 125, 
American International College of 
Springfield has been scheduled, fol- 
lowed by the same teams in the 
identical order they were met this 
year. Always a stiff opponent, Bow- 
doin will next face the Carawaymen 
on Alumni Field, October 2, The 
Brunswick, Maine, Polar Bears have 
won the last two games from State by 
the margin of point conversions, 7-6 
in 1935 and 14-12 this year. October 
9 finds Connecticut State on the 
schedule playing at Amherst. The 
Storrs team broke a seven-year losing 
streak, this year, to swamp M.S.C. 
13-0 and will have the same dangerous 
squad back in '37. 

Rhode Island State, vanquished 
this season, will loom stronger on its 
home field October 16. Worcester 
Poly will entertain October 23. The 
traditional Amherst- M.S.C. battle to 
be fought again on Alumni Field, 
October 30. Played here, this past 
season, the game should advance to 
Pratt Field but the matter is yet to 
be straightened out. 



With about two weeks of practice 
completed Ihe basketball team is 
slowly rounding into shape. Coach 
Frigard is not elated over t he fact 
that he has nine lettermen on hand, 
for he believes his main problem is 
psychological. To that end he is 
endeavoring to key up the team to 
the emotional pitch so that they will 
revenge lust year's defeat when they 
open against Middlehury one week 
from today. 

Couch Krigard has finally cut the 
scpiad to sixteen men. Those remain- 
ing are forwards ('apt. Lefty Barr, 
Czelusniak, Fred Kiel, RustigJan, 
Slesinski, Kldridgc, Click, and South- 
wick; centers McNally, Bokina and 
Riley; and guards Osley, Putnam, 
Sievers, Zelas/.o, and Bush. At present 
the team lines up with Barr at right 
forward, Czelusniak or Fred Kiel at 
left forward, McNally or Bokina at 
center, and with the two guard posi- 
tions being alloted among Sievers, 
Bush, and Putnam. Bred Kiel is 
being drilled at center and may break 
into the lineup at that position. 
Among the sophomores Kldridge is 
being given serious consideration ;it 
one of the forward posts, while 
Zelas/.o is a likely guard prospect. 

The Middlehury team will offer 
hard competition for the opening 
game. It will be a team thai has had 
experience under fire for the State 
game is third on their schedule. Al- 
though Middlehury has been riddled 
by graduation, il the enthusiasm ol an 
Unbeaten football schedule carries 
through it will be ■ hard 000 to heal 



Although scheduled for Nov. 6, the 
Coast Guard game may be played 
under lights, the night before, if 
plans materialize. R.P.I, will journey 
to Amherst November 13 to engage 
the Statesmen and the important 
Tufts battle will be fought on Alumni 
Field, closing the season. 



The football schedule follows: 

Sept. 28 A. I. C. there 

Oct. 2 Bowdoin here 

9 COMI, State here 

16 Rhodt Island there 

22 Worcester Te, 1 1 there 

80 Amherst un de ci ded 

Nov. 6 Coast Guard there 

12 Kensselear here 

20 Tuffs here 




Although the captains for next 
year's fall sports have been elected 
by now, they will not be made public 
until next Thursday at Insignia Con- 
vocation. Speaker for the occasion 
will be Sports Kditor of the Hartford 
Courant. Mr. Keane was formerly 
sports editor of the Springfield Union. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 

RECEIVED ONU ONE OOUUti 
DRE£EE--AN LIB FP-0M 
MSVIINGTOU OXtH£,MD. 



L 



NDUWFRSITY 01 - US\U CO I 
INOiXjM UPSTlCK ANNUMX1 P ! BWN1 
FOUR 0000 ST/ CD BARNS ' IME AVI 
CD 10 OGVEfcy 968 SQ Fill OF UW 

■ IN A Yt AR ■ ' ' 

... t ■' •■ 



A. T. Wilson W. E. I,ondergan 

THE KJNGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 

Telephone 554 Northampton, Mass 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C OLLEGIAN. THU RSDAY. DECEMBER 10. 1936 

■ 



Campus Organizations Reached New High 
in Talks to Members During the Week 

Who Sleeps in Goodell Library and 
Why Disclosed hy Collegian Survey 




Glick, Radcliffe, True 
Address Groups 



W.A.A. Tea 

A tea sponsored by the W.A.A. web 
held Wednesday afternoon in the 
Abbey center from three to five. 
Bettina Hall '39 was in charge. 



The number of talks sponsored on 
the campus rearhed a Mf high last 
week with speakers presented by the 
Press Club, Pre- Med Club, Vespers, 
Outing Club, International Relations 
Club, Bacteriology Club. 4-H Club, 
Radio Club. Math Club. Entomology 
Club, and Sigma Xi in addition to 
regular convocation speakers 

Quotations from talks of especial 
interest to M.S.C students follow. 

Dr. Ernest J. Radcliffe tells the Pre- 
Med Club of the advantages of the 
college physician. "The job of college 
physician is a very interesting and 
enviable one. A doctor in such a 
position has to deal with a very de- 
sirable group of individuals whose 
medical needs are not complicated 
and are of the same general types. 
Hypochondriacs and neurosthemcs, 
individuals that comprise a good share 
of the patient* of the average doctor, 
are rare among college students, to 
the college doctor's good fortune. 
And the financial worries that face 
most doctors are unknown to the 
college physician with his regular 
salary." 

Dr. Harry N. Click, speaking at 
Vespers, sums up his argument for 
'•Spiritual Hygiene." "Thus methods 
and instances of banishing or compen- 
sating for the natural ills of life may 
be multiplied. But some will say that 
none I have enumerated are based 
upon definite facte of reality. My 
rejoinder is that I believe it is high 
time for us to look for meanings and 
values as well as for certainties. Most 
evidently scientific and logical cer- 
tainty is no certain measure of mean- 
ing and value. 

"Spiritual hygiene then has to do 
with proper practices relative to the 
inadequacies and short comings of 
human nature. Practices are con- 
sidered hygienical to the extent that 
they achieve their goal." 

Dr. Rodney R. True, Director of the 
Morris Arboretum, University of Penn- 
sylvania, at the first Sigma Xi lecture 
last Monday emphasizes the importance 
of soil erosion. "Erosion is not only 
an extremely important problem of 
the present day but also one of the 
oldest of which we know. 

"The principle forces of erosion are 
wind and water. Wind is able to 
transport considerable quantities of 
soil from place to place, as was evi- 
denced in glacial times when a great 
amount of pulverized rock was blown 
to the west of the Mississippi. The 
action of water is still more important 
and does a tremendous amount of 

k»» 



A survey to determine who and 
why about the scholars seen asleep in 
the Goodell Library has just been 
completed. The Collegian selected a 
cross-section of ten typical cases. Of 
these, there were six freshmen, three 
unclassified, and one senior. Case 
histories are described below. 
Krt'slinifii 
'3 asleep over U.S. History, Morrison 
& Comma nger 

2 asleep over Cenerul Botany for 

MAKE ADDITIONS 
TO CURRICULUM 



The new edition of the college 
catalogue for the sessions of 1936-37 
bears notice of changes in and addi- 
tions to the curriculum of the college. 
New subjects are added in the divi- 
sion of home economics, and in the 
departments of forestry, pomology, 
and mathematics and civil engineer- 
ing. Revisions are made in courses 
in the departments of zoology, edu- 
cation and psychology, and languages 
and literature. 



College, R. E. Torrey 

1 asleep over Freshman Algebra 

I'neliissificd 

1 asleep over Economies 

1 asleep over Landscape Architecture 

1 asleep over Colliers magazine 

Senior 

1 asleep over • The senior 

was snoring so peacefully, our corre- 
spondent didn't have the heart to 
disturb him to see his l>ook. 



CAMERA CLUB WILL 
EXHIBIT IN MARCH 



Si&iua Beta Chi 

A special feature of Sigma Beta's 
closed date last Friday night was the 
cutting of a huge Sigma Beta cake by 
Priscilla Bradford. This event took 
place at the home of Col. H. T. 
Aplington. To cut the cake, Perky 
used a large saber, which once be- 
longed to General Braddock. 

A "vie" party will be held at 
Katherine Machmer's home Friday 
night, Dec. 18, for members and 
pledges. 

Betty Reynolds has been selected 
captain of the new pledges. Helen 
H alias was chosen secretary. 

Mrs. Machmer and her daughter 
Katherine, are entertaining Sigma 
Beta and their new pledges at their 
home with a tea next Sunday from 
four to six. 



Peterson Heads 
Psychology Club 

A demonstration of hypnosis w. s 
presented by Professor Harry N. 
Glick and Mr. Becker at the fir t 
meeting of the Psychology Club he | 
on Wednesday, Nov. 18. 

Following the demonstration, eh 
tion of officers was held. David 
Peterson '37 was chosen president; 
Donald Tucker '37, vice-president; 
Franklin Berry '37, treasurer; and 
Phyllis Nelson '38, secretary. 

The Psychology.Club was organized 
this year for the purpose of giving in 
opportunity to the student body at 
large to hear lectures on vwrfoui 
topics in the field of psychology hy 
speakers of wide repute. Tentative 
speakers are Dr. Clarence Hodgkms 
of the Clark School in Northampton, 
Dr. R. G. MacPherson of the Pel 
chertown State School, and W. V. 
Burrier of the research department gj 
the Veterans Hospital at Leeds. 



T1IK MASSACHUSETTS COLLKCilAN, Till 'KSIIAY. DBCBMBHB 10. ItM 



S 



Plans for a Connecticut Valley 
Salon of photographs to take place 
next March in the Jones Library have 
been announced by the Amherst 
Camera Club. This salon will include 
all clubs from Brattleboro to Hartford. 

Entry forms will be mailed to all 
clubs early in December. An entry 
fee of seventy-five cents must accom- 
pany all entries. Not more than four 
prints may be submitted by an ex- 
hibitor. 



Home Be 

The course called "Institutional 
Foods and Management" has been 
added to the studies in the division of 
home economics. Three credit* will be 
given for one class hour and two two- 
hour laboratory periods. 

The new course in the forestry de- 
partment is "Introduction to Wildlife 
Management." The course is designed 
for seniors, juniors, and sophomores 
who expect to make forestry or the 
management of wild life their career. 
The course will consist of one lecture 
period and one four-hour laboratory 
per week. 

The department of pomology offers 
a new course entitled "Special Prob- 
lems in Plant Breeding." The subject 
will be taught by Professor French, 
and will give two credits. 
Mathematics 
A new course for juniors and seniors 
interested in mathematics, the funda- 
mental mathematical principles of 
statistical analysis, offers three credits 
for three class hours, and will be 
taught by Mr. Boutelle. Mr. Swenson 
will teach a course to juniors and 
seniors in engineering drawing. In 
addition, Mr. Swenson will teach 
another course in descriptive geometry 
to juniors and seniors. 



An attractive catalogue of the show 
will be issued, and special stickers 
attached to all prints hung. Three 
superior awards will be given the three 
best prints in the show, and five 
honorable mentions given the next 
five best prints. These prints will be 
reproduced in the rotogravure section 
of the Springfield Sunday Republican, 
March 7th. 




I.iiiiil.d.i Delta Mu 

On Saturday, Dec. 12, the annual 
pledge formal will be held at the Hills' 
Memorial. Dick Minott's orchestra 
will play for dancing from 8 to 11:30. 
The chaperones will be Major and 
Mrs. Leo B. Connor and Captain and 
Mrs. H. P. Stewart; invited guests 
will be Mrs. Ward Damon and Mrs. 
Mary Broughton. 

Alpha Lambda Mu 

Helen Carew '38 has recently be- 
come a pledge. 

A "vie" party will be held Saturday 
night. Beatrice Davenport '39 is in 

charge. 

Eleven girls were given the pledge 
service, Monday night, Dec. 7. 

Phi Zeta 

The pledges are giving a tea this 
afternoon for the pledges of the other 
sororities. Marjorie Erwin is in charge. 

Phi Zeta will hold its annual 
Christmas party for members, pledges, 
and patronnesses next Sunday after- 
noon. Phyllis Snow is chairman of 
the committee in charge. 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

eCANDCNICC'l 
CKTALRANT 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
Foot Is and Beverages 

Dine, Wine and Dance 



MEET AT 



BARSEIOTTFS CAfE 

BALLANTINE'S ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 
Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



Shows Daily 2:30 6:30 8:30 



u 



Thank. He*'- !• 

Lew Ayres, Mary Carlisle, in 

Lady Be Careful" 

— also — 

»!.-» MAIDEN LANE" 

with 
Claire Trevor, Cesar Romero 



LIKE WINTER SPORTS? 

Come in and see our line of sporting equipment 



» 



SKATES 

SKIIS 

POLES 

BINDINGS 

HOCKEY STICKS 

ATHLETIC SOCKS 



$2.95 and $4.95 pr. 

8.00 pr. 

2.50 pr. 

2.98 pr. 

75c and 1.00 ea. 

25c pr. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Fri.-Sat., Dec-. lt«12 

Freddie Bartholomew in 

"Devil is a Sissy 

plus — 
James Fenimore Cooper's 
"LAST OF MOHICANS" 

And: MARCH OF TIME 



COMPACTS 

CKiARETTE CASES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 

arrived this week 

CHRISTMAS CARDS ANI> 
WRAPPINGS 

miss Cutlers Gift Shop 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE 

ART CALENDARS 

Just arrived Ready for mailing 

A fine wiuvenir 

An excellent Christina** Gift 

Every student will want one of thest 
attractive calendars with six views 
of the campus. 

GET YOURS EARLY AT 

THE COLLEGE STORE 



Sun—Mon.-Tue*., Dee. 13-15 

Joan Crawford, Clark Gable 



in 



u 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



35 Pleast 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Love on the Run" 

with Franchot Tone 
Also: Mickey Mouse Others 



HYGEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



Wed.-Tlmrs., Pee 



1IJ-1 



Max Reinhardt's production of 

"A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" 

By William Shakespeare 
Music by Mendelsson 



Wake Up And Live 

By Dorothea Brande $1.78 

Live Alone And Like It 

By Marjorie Hillis $1.50 

Wake I'|» Alone And Like It 

For those with cold feet $1.49 



Hooks with Fine Color lM:it«- 

Wild FloMer* 

By House $3.95 

Birds of America $395 



JAMES A, LOWELL, Bookseller 




THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our liiah-cla»**ed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



WATERPROOFED SKI PARKAS 

Natural and Navy blue special at $5 ,.00 
Wool Mackinaws and Parkas $7.50 to $12.50 
Ski Sox, Mittens and Caps. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothe* for College Men for forty-five yean 




College Candy Kitchen 



HOW ABOUT A LIGHT LUNCH 

or refreshment after the cinema or in the evening? 
"The student tradition going down to the Greeks" 



PRISCILLA BRADFORD ELECTED 
COLONEL BY MILITARY MAJORS 



Miss Priscilla Bradford '37 was 
chooen honorary colonel for the 1936 
Military Ball held last Friday evening 
• n ,he Drill Hall. 

Chosen by Cadets 

Miss Bradford was chosen by the 
luniur and senior cadets attending the 
Hall. Ballots were turned in to Lt. 
Col. Aplington, who announced the 
choice immediately following the 
grand march, and presented the honor- 
,,r\ .olonel with a bouquet of red 
rotes, Miss Bradford was escorted by 
Cadet Lieut. Robert Couhig. 

The decoration motif of the evening 
was red, white, and blue, and the hall 
w;) s Hanked with silhouettes depicting 
military scenes. The music of Felix 
rYnliaando was excellent, and pro- 
vided a very adequate setting for the 
110 couples that attended the Ball. 

The Morning After 

.lust enough people there to make 
n interesting and not too many to 
prevent a good time. . . everybody 
seemed to be dancing, too. . . and the 
chaperones had their fun. . . taking 
ladv.tntage of the fine music to trip 
I about a bit. . . quite a few outsiders 
present. . . who was escorting whom 
prosified the grapevine with the usual 
[material. . . sorry the Collegian can't 
pet specific. . . some unusual combina- 
tions though which may or may not 
llast through the sorority formal sea- 
Ison. . . those performers who invaded 
It he dance during the late hours were 
|not added attractions presented by 
the committee. . . in fact, most people 
are wondering what occasioned their 
coming at all. . . the committee looked 
rather tired during the last few dances, 
but that's explainable. . . they put up 
the decorations. . . pretty nice deco- 
rations they were too. . . interesting 
the way they take decorations down 
*fter dances here. . . one tall com- 
littee member being responsible for 
half the removal. . . they say the 
[olon.'l had to let the orchestra in 
Bfter Felix had waited about an hour 
|n the cold. . . the honorary colonel 
M attractive in her coral satin 
town. . . her escort was also attractive 
In his smile of victory, which he is 
Mill wearing. 



Exhibit of Etchings 
Loaned to Phys-Ed 

("pies of etchings by several fam- 
I lists, loaned by Professor Frank 

Waugh, are now placed on exhibit 
the Physical Education Building. 

James McBey is represented by his 
\Hght in Ely Cathedral. There is a 
r"up uf three pictures by Benson of 
lildfowl, Mallards, Broadbills, and 
Morning , 

The collection includes two etchings 
I' rank Mrangwyn, depicting indus- 
lial scenes, Cannon Street Station 
' with the train coming in, and 



Delegates Sent to 
Peace Conference 

Massachusetts State College will be 
represented by Warren Bray '38 and 
Barbara Miller '38 at the New Eng- 
land Conference of the International 
Relations Clubs to be held at Clark 
University on December 11 and 12 
by invitation of the Carnegie Founda- 
tion for international peace. 

The principal speakers will be Dr. 
Samuel Van Valkenburg and Dr. 
George Blakeslee of Clark University 
and Miss Amy Hemingway Jones, 
division assistant of the Carnegie 
Endowment. 



FINE ARTS TALK ON 
LIFE AND PAINTINGS 
OF ITALIAN ARTIST 



Discussing Giotto with especial 
reference to the frescos on the walls 
of Scrovegno chapel in Padua, Mr. 
Franklin Williams of Amherst College 
spoke last Tuesday afternoon on the 
weekly Fine Arts program. 

Mr. Williams presented first the 
historical background of Giotto's peri- 
od. Describing the low level in art 
and morals to which Europe had fallen 
in the Dark Ages, he told how a revival 
of religious feeling and a reform of 
the church was accompanied by a 
higher development of art in the 
thirteenth century. 

Cimabue was one of the greatest 
figures in this development of painting, 
and by him, who is generally thought 
to be Giotto's master, Giotto was 
influenced. 

Little is known of the life of Giotto. 
He was born in the latter half of the 
thirteenth century and died in 1336. 
He first came into prominence with 
the decoration of the cathedral at 
Assissi. Tt was his work on the 
frescos of the Scrovegno Chapel at 
Padua which Mr. Williams considered 
at greatest length. 

These frescos are concerned with 
events in the life of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary and her parents leading to the 
birth of Christ. They are to be pre- 
sented as living pictures by the 
Amherst Masquers in College Hall on 
December 15 and 16. 



Breaking up the Duncan. Santa Maria 
della Salute, also by Brangwyn, shows 
the church through a haze of cables 
and beams. 

St. Peter's, Rome, is the subject of 
an etching by William Walcot. Deep 
religious feeling is shown in a group 
by Forain which includes The Breaking 
of the Bread and The Communion for 
the Sick. 



tl 1'in fend Pencil Set* - Dttfc Set* - Pl.iyiiiK Csfdt and other Bridge AtUUorlU 

lamed tad 8pw mi College stationery - Book* tor jieojiU- ot all Ages and Interest! 

ke Skates and other Athletic Ki|uii>ment 



A. J. Hastings 



NEWSDEALER and 
STATIONER 



17 So. Pleasant St. 



TABLEAU FROM 
CHRISTMAS 
PLAY IN 1935 



BAY STATE REVUE ANNOUNCED 
BY ROISTER D0ISTER LEADER 




CHRISTMAS PLAY 

Continued from Page 1 
stance Fortin as Mary, Lawrence 
Levinson as Gabriel; Angels: Ma- 
belle Booth, Elizabeth Jasper. Elthea 
Thompson, Irma Malm, Jessie Kins- 
man, Emma Taft. Rosamond Burke, 
and Lillian Jackson; Shepherds: Ken 
Ross, Bill Avery, Norman Grant, and 
Malcolm Little; Wise Men: Dave 
Rossiter, Squire Monson, and Frederic 
Burnham (Stockbridge). 

The committee in charge of cos- 
tumes includes Marion Maschin, 
Elizabeth Olson, and Dorothy Nichols. 
Gordon Moody and Ray Moult will 
attend to the lighting and stage effects. 

Stietes Appears on 
Fine Arts Program 

Professor Raymond S. Stietes, 
chairman of the department of Art 
and Esthetics of Antioch College will 
appear next Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. in 
Memorial Hall on the weekly Fine 
Arts program. He will give an illus- 
trated talk on the subject of Leonardo 
da Vinci. 

Professor Stietes is well known in 
America for his writings on art as 
well as for his creative efforts. He has 
lectured widely on art. and recently 
has been invited to give lectures at 
the University of Chicago and at 
Oberlin College. He is now in the 
East preparing his forthcoming book, 
"An Introduction to Art." 

LAST OF GERMAN 
MOVIES MONDAY 

Appearing this Monday ai the 
Amherst Theatre will be "Geschi<t< n 
aus dem Wienerwald," the final Ger- 
man movie in a series of five spon- 
sored by the German department. 
The showing will start at 4:.'Jf>. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
Work called for and delivered Telephone 828 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 

Winter Sports 

Togs lead 

the line 




We stock the finest Ski Clothing 

in this part of the country. 

Ski Suit* Pjirltns Sweaters 

Ski Boot* official model) 

Outfits for Men and Women 



PRESIDENT SHOWS 
COLLEGE RELATION 
TO TEACHING FIELD 



The relationship of Massachusetts 
State College to the teaching pro- 
fession was pointed out by President 
Hugh P. Baker of M.S.C. in an 
article in the November issue of The 
Mussai h ii setts Teacher. 

Dr. Baker revealed that approxi- 
mately 21 % of the graduates of the 
State College are engaged in educa- 
tional work as teachers, supervisors, 
college professors, and superintend- 
ents. 

In preparation for the teaching of 
vocational agriculture, special courses 
are maintained at the college for 
those students who are interested in 
teaching in vocational schools and 
vocational departments in the high 
schools. 

Dr. Baker discusses the curriculum 
of Massachusetts State and its various 
departments: the undergraduate di- 
vision, experiment stations, extension 



The annual Bay Slat* Kcviji- is due 
for presentation the evening of Janu- 
ary 9, in Bowker Auditorium, it was 
announced today by .John S. Hoar, 
president of t he Boister Doisters. 

The revue, according to Hoar, will 
take the same form as did last year's. 
Originality of content and presenta- 
tion will be the keynote and the 
affair will be entirely prepared, direc- 
ted and presented hy students under 
the sponsorship of the Boister Doisters. 

The Boister Doisters, said Hoar, are 
in search of more originality than has 
been the fare in recent revues. At 
least one musical and one dramatic 
skit is in throes of preparation and it 
is hoped that the Boister Doister 
committee in charge will be informed 
of others before the Christmas holi- 
days. 

The revue will combine lioth the 
serious and the comic forms of music 
and drama, as far as material is 
available. All students with talent 
suitable for presentation January 9 are 
urged to register before the holidays 
with John Hoar, Lucille Monroe or 
Jack Dobby. The Boister Doisters 
will, of course reserve the right to 
censor any material they feel is un- 
suited. 

Members of the Roister Doisters 
last Tuesday evening attended a per- 
formance of Shakespeare's Othello in 
Springfield, starring Walter Huston 
and Nan Sutherland, noted screen and 
stage actors. 



services, graduate school, short 
courses (Slockhridge School, Winter 
School, etc.), control services, and the 
field stations. 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



p^v 



W'4m 





Sure She Loves Perfume 

A glamorous, distinguished, persuasive perfume is a gift 
that sparkles with gaiety and one that is as welcome as a 
smile. Make your selection at Wellworth's. We have the 
newest odeurs in beautiful, eye-catching containers. 

CHRISTMAS COSMETICS 

A wide assortment of the most popular preparations in 
beautiful packages that add to their desirability as gifts. 
RICHARD HUDNUT Sets l.io to 10.00 

COTY'S Sets 1.10 to 5.00 

EVENING IN PARIS Sets 1.35 to 7.50 

MAX FACTOR Sets 1.50 to 5.00 

CIGARETTE VANITY CASES 3.50 to 7.50 

COTY'S PERFUME 1.10 to 3.75 

BEAUTIFUL COMPACTS 55c to 10.00 

I.imiK nl our window* for viiriMy 

Any of the above Christmas Gifts may be reserved for a 

small deposit 

WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

THK (IT BATS STORK 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



iiik luawnMrn collk<;ian, TIUBSUAV. UWIMBKH 10. l»X 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



NETTLKTON SHOES 

TRY A PAIR OF NETTLETON ALGONQUINS 



Deputations Team 
Has Active Plans 



Second Dance Class 
Friday Night at 7:30 



The Christian Federation on the 
M.S.C campus has inaugurated an 
extensive program of activity for the 
year with the production of a play, 
and the inclusion of a large deputation 
schedule. 

The dramatic group of the Christian 
Federation presented the play. "Sons 
of the Soil" .-it the Haptist Church 
last Sunday. Nov. 22. The Federation 
plans to give the play at numerous 
other churches. 

The schedule of deputations has 
included one to Mt. Holyoke College. 
Robert Gage '38 and Marion Shaw 
*38 spoke on the relationship between 
religion and social action. The Christ- 
ian Federation deputation te-mi con- 
ducted the evening service at Grace 

Church. Holyoke. December 0. Pro- 
fessor Charles Fraker spoke on the 
fcopfc, "Among the Head Hunters." 
On December 15, ■ deputation is 



The first social dancing class of the 
series of eight was held Friday, Doc. 
4 with 63 present in the Memorial 
Building. These classes are being 
conducted by Mr. P. B. Shearer, who 
was the dance instructor here Jast 
year. Classes begin promptly at 7:30 
and end promptly at 9:30 p.m. 

Mr. Shearer plans to separate the 

class into a class for beginners and a 

class for more advanced dancing. 

Three of the classes will be held on 

Friday nights before Christmas, and 

.five after Christmas. Most of the 

1 classes will be held in Drill Hall, but 

Ion account of the Military Hall the 

'first class was held in the Memorial 

I Building 



scheduled to the Southampton rVdet 
a ted Church. 



CATCHING FISH AT M.S.C 

Continued from Page 1 

smart enough to do half her studying 

as well as his own, he was good enough 

! for her. 

Miss Co-ed also had some very in- 
teresting comments to make on the 
best methods of keeping a man once 
i he has been ensnared. According to her, 
there were several competent methods, 
but those most applicable to college 
i life are the sweetness and light method, 
the alternating vinegar and sugar meth- 
lod, the Amazon method, and the 
shrinking violet method. 

"The requisites of the sweetness and 
light method," Miss Co-ed explained, 
"are a beaming countenance, a heart 
'full of joy, and a sincere appreciation 
Of humanity. This method works in 
very few cases, but if the man W a pa- 
cifist, a communist, or an English ma- 
jor, you're sure to keep him. 
The A.-C Method 
"The alternating vinegar and sugar 
method is by far the best. In utilizing 
this method, the girl leads her man on 
with sweeetness and light for a time, 



places an obstacle in his way which she 
is sure he can overcome, then back to 
sweetness and light, continuing the al- 
ternation until the desired effect is 
achieved. 

"As to the Amazon method," Miss 
Co-ed went on, "this, again is appli- 
cable in only a very few cases. If the 
gal swings a mean right or left, or can 
glare forcefully enough, or if she can 
'get something on' her man, then she 
has nothing to worry about." 
Only Too True 
When asked if getting something on 
a man' implied blackmail, Miss Co-ed 
replied that you had to have money to 
have blackmail, and no man has money 
around this college. 

"The shrinking violet method," con- 
tinued Miss Co-ed, "is the one most 
used, and ranks second in effect only 
to the alternating vinegar and sugar 
method. By shrinking violet 1 mean 
assuming a pseudo-childlike attitude 
almost down to the point of talking 
baby-talk. Never use baby-talk, how- 
ever. If you can get him to call you 
'Cuddles' then as a user of the shrink- 



ing violet method, you are superb.' 

At the conclusion of the interview. 
Miss Co-ed stated that if enough wo- 
men students would apply, she would 
be very glad to hold clinics on the man- 
ner of male selection and holding. Miss 
Co-ed, who ought to know her stuff. 
has been three times a sophomore tnd 
twice a junior. 



SORORITY PLEDGES 

Continued from Page 1 

Alpha Lambda Mil 

Class of 1940 Carolyn Monk, Eve, 
Ivn KUery, Peggy Firth, Pris 
Oertel, Esther Pratt, Dorothy Kelly, 
Anna Hanuzkewic, Dorothy Phipfa, 
Rosa Kohls, and Beryl Barton. 
Sigma Iota 

Class of 1940 Roma Levy, Ida 
Davis, and Myrtle Sherry. 



PATRONIZE OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



...out of the 

orn of Plenty 



. . , mild ripe tobaccos 

from the Carolinas, Georgia, Ken- 
tucky,MarylandandVirginia— there's 
aplenty of the best in Chesterfield. 

. . . aromatic tobaccos 

from Turkey and Greece— and plenty 
to make Chesterfields taste better— 
and different. 

Pleasing taste and aroma, re- 
freshing mildness— Chesterfields 
are chockfull of the good things 
you enjoy in a cigarette. 







, . .for the good things 
smoking can give you 



...enjoy Chesterfields 



WATT 
SPEAKS 
JAN. 14 




M. A. C. Library. 



Mpi 



SEE NO 
N.Y.A. CUT 
AT M.S.C. 



voh xLvn 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1936 



N.. 12 



lAlma Boyden Selected 
for Lead in Operetta 



jilbert and Sullivan Oper- 
etta "Utopia Limited" to 
be Presented at Bay State 
Revue January 9th 

Alma Boyden '37 has been selected 
for the feminine lead in the Gilbert and 
gullivan operetta Utopia Limited, 
rbkfa will be presented on January 9 
It Huwker Auditorium as part of the 
ggy State Revue, according to the 
kiai.iiunt issued by Mr. Frank B. 
itratton. 

Had Lead Last Year 

Miss Alma Boyden has appeared in 
Runnrous musical roles and had the 
"feminine lead last year in Gilbert and 
Sullivan's operetta Trial By Jury. 

I 'utpia Limited is the major part of 
I,, i - ining's entertainment in the Bay 
|tate Revue, while other features will 
musical and dramatic sketches. 
hiM operetta is larger than Gilbert and 
Sullivan's Trial By Jury which was pre- 
Loted last year by the orchestra and 
Jlee club combined. Utopia Limited is 
ny operetta with the setting on a 
outh Sea island. Scene one takes place 
I palm grove, while scene two is in 
he throne room of the king's palace. 

Cjlf-tt 

The members of the cast follow: 
King Paramount the first, Ivan Cou- 
Continued on Page 2 



CHRISTMAS PLAY 
ATTENDED BY 250 



Two hundred and fifty people were 

fcesent last evening, Dec. 16, when 

tk' Keligious, Dramatic, and Musical 

lfc-'ii>tion presented their Christmas 

p)< . "A Mystery for Christmas," in 

||owker Auditorium. 

Ih' story was presented in three 

kbleaux in the following manner: 

Be first tableau represented the 

kphotb led by the angels to the 

ganger; the second showed the wise 

fringing gifts to the child, and 

ke third represented Mary saying her 

layer of thanksgiving. 

| 1 he -nld parts were sung by Barbara 

"il -lames Kerr; and the two 

Ming parts in the tableaux, namely 

lary, and Gabriel, were played by 

noe Fortin, and Lawrence 

fcvinson. 



lommittee Displays 
Picture of Class Ring 

|A final photo of the new college 

* design will be on display at 

DdeU Library Thursday. This half- 

n ' photo has been received by 

Moony I'rrrucci, chairman of the 

^R "'imnittee, and is an exact copy 

the rim It is expected that the 

ting in various sizes and 

P*nes will |„. ready for display soon 

p f ("hri-unas. 
fh 



rh 



rnmittee has decided that 

■ it the beginning of the 

una ft pester, one week will be 

"•"Bated hs Junior Ring Sign-up 

W, during which time, together 

netnberi of the committee and 

w's representative, stud- 

mi » x s-n for their rings. 

will normally be ready for 
junior i, v the first of Mnrch T h e 

* hive their sign-up week 
Continued on Page 5 



OPERETTA LEAD 




ALMA R. BOYDEN '37 



To Arrange for 
Winter Carnival 
Transportation 



Further plans announced this week 
by the winter carnival committee in- 
clude special arrangements for the 
transportation of people to the carni- 
val from Boston, Worcester and points 
en route. The committee feels that, 
since several people are planning to 
have visitors on campus during carni- 
val week-end, there will be plenty of 
opportunity to do so at a minimum 
of expense. 

Call for Transportation 

Students planning to take advan- 
tage of these transportation rates are 
urged to get in touch with Ben Hur- 
witz at Phi Lambda Tau (Tel. 8110) 
or with Philip Layton at Theta Chi 
(Tel. 759-M). 

Also, in order to stimulate interest 
in the bringing of visitors to campus 
for the week-end, the committee has 
formulated new plans for the election 
of the carnival queen. The queen will 
not be elected, as was previously 
announced, by a student ballot, but 
will be chosen at the carnival ball by 
a committee of newspapermen and 
Continued on Page 4 



N.Y.A. TO BE 
CUT IN VERY 
NEAR FUTURE 



No Effect at M.S.C. 
Says Glatfelter 

The N.Y.A. allotment is to be re- 
duced in the near future, Aubrey 
Williams, Deputy Administrator of 
the W.P.A. and N.Y.A. stated in a 
report received at the Collegian office 
this week. According to the report, 
Congress failed to appropriate enough 
funds to carry on the relief measures 
and the N.Y.A. must take a propor- 
tionate curtailment. 

No Ini ni<-<li.it< Effect 

No immediate effect from this move 
will be felt by State students employed 
through government funds, according 
to Professor Guy V. Glatfelter, place- 
ment officer for men. No word has as 
yet been received at the placement 
office concerning the amount of cur- 
tailment. The fall budget, according 
to Professor Glatfelter, will remain in 
effect through the present college year. 

The American Student Union, in a 
report commenting upon the proposed 
N.Y.A. cut, states: "Student who 
wish the N.Y.A. to be maintained 
must get out and work for its con- 
tinuation by putting pressure on 
Congress. Write letters to your Con- 
gressman. Send delegates to your 
Senators and Representatives. If over 
a million dollars can be appropriated 
to take care of the nation's munition 
men, can not a few million be appro- 
priated for the nation's youth?" 

275 Employed Now 

At present, figures from the place- 
ment office show that about 275 
students are employed. 

Tradition of Dean's 
Board Again Upheld 

The sophomore class continued to 
uphold college tradition this week by 
virtue of their dominance of the Dean's 
Board. Juniors and Seniors trailed by 
the usual margin. 

The annual Dean's Board gag this 
year centered on the fact that junior 
and senior marks were posted in the 
same room as next semester's programs. 
Wags, looking at the red and black 
marks beside their names, would re- 
mark to the registrar with a leer, "Is 
this my next semester's program?" 



Sievers Leads M.S.C. 
Footballers in 1937 



CHOSEN CAPTAIN 




FRED J. SIEVERS '38 



Maroon Key Men 

Are Aroused by 

Larceny of Hats 



An outbreak of petty thievery on 
the campus has been climaxed by the 
hitherto unprecedented theft of three 
Maroon Key hats from various points 
about the college. They have been 
taken from places frequented only by 
members of the student body. 

In addition to being significant of 
an elective office, these hats are worth 
far more than their material value to 
their owners, and unless they are re- 
turned, must be replaced at consider- 
able personal expense by the members. 

In a letter to the Collegian, Robert 
Packard, Maroon Key president states: 
". . . Does this mean that the student 
body is not in favor of the organiza- 
tion, or does it mean that there are a 
few undergraduates who consider it 
clever to appropriate such property? 

"Naturally, we would appreciate 
the return of any or all of these hats, 
and hope that the student body will 
co-operate in eliminating any further 
occurrences of this sort." 



M.S.C. Males' Modus Operandi Eclipses Elizabeth 
Co-ed's" Says Doolittle '38 in Publicity Demand 



To the Collegian office last Thursday 
afternoon, shortly after the publica- 
tion of last week's issue, came Ichabod 
Doolittle '38 with a complaint. "We 
social butterflies of the male sex were 
grossly unpublicized in the columns of 
the Collegian," said he. 

The reporter assigned to the case 
allowed Mr. Doolittle to continue 
despite the slurring remark. "We 
want to show the campus how we 
conduct ourselves socially. People 
must think we men have no social 
aptitude at all, after what Miss Co-ed 
said. 

Truth Will Out 

"The truth of the matter is," Mr. 
Doolittle continued, not waiting for 
the reporter to ask him, "that we 
males of the socially elite have a 
modus operandi which more than 
eclipses that propounded by Miss 
Co-ed." 



"What is it?" The reporter spoke 
while Doolittle was breathing. 

"It's a system which we don't 
mind telling you about, since women 
are always dumb enough to let it 
work. I'm not even afraid of my own 
social prestige when I let this out." 

It may be mentioned at this point 
that Mr. Doolittle is also a familiar 
figure on the Mount Holyoke campus, 
not through necessity but through 
choice. 

First, Second, Third Phiie* 

"In the first place," Doolittle opined, 
"the women like to be flattered. In 
the second place they like to be 
coaxed. In the third place, they like 
to think they are putting something 
over on the rest of the women. There 
are a few other places, too, but these 
are enough for my present purposes. 

"It's easy to flatter a woman. In 
fact, most of them are so open to 



flattery that they take every male 
statement as a compliment, which of 
course helps us men considerably. 

"As far as the coaxing matter goes, 
that's easy, too. When you're talking 
to your current prospect, all you have 
to do is mention some other women, 
some other sorority than her own, or 
some other incident she doesn't think 
you know anything about, and you 
have her well coaxed. This is a very 
important part of the system, but 
watch out that you don't carry it too 
far. You know, there are certain 
sororities which you absolutely must 
not mention while speaking to certain 
girls." 

Sorority rushing, having just been 
concluded, the reporter was more than 
aware of this fact. 

A line for Mount Holyoke 

"A lot of the boys are using Mount 
Continued on* Page 6 



Soccermen Elect Vincent 
Couper '38 Captain-Elect; 
Keane Talks on Sports- 
manship in Convocation 

Announcement was made at today's 
Insignia Convocation of the elections 
of Fred Sievers '38 to the captaincy of 
the football team and Vincent Couper 
'38 to lead the soccer team. 

Sievers, who has been a letter man 
in both basketball and football for two 
years, was the recipient of the Richards 
Memorial Cup last year. He was given 
honorable mention on the all-American 
football team chosen this fall by the 
Sport Pictorial, national football week- 

ly. 

Couper has been outstanding at 
center half for the booters for two 
years, and plays a dependable game at 
shortstop for the baseball team. 

The captain of cross-country was 
elected late yesterday afternoon by 
members of the team. His name was 
witheld until this morning's convo- 
cation. 

Keane Spenka 

Striking good sportmanship as the 
keynote of a well-received speech clo- 
sing convocation, Albert W. Keane, 
sports editor for the Hartford Courant, 
went on to show just how sportsman- 
ship related to everyday life. Mr. Keane 
defined sportsmanship as that some- 
thing which gives one the feeling that 
a victory not fairly won is not won. 

"And that definition," he said, "ap- 
plies to everything in life — whether it 
be your desire to win your degree, 
your wife or your husband, political or 
civic honors, business success or vic- 
tory in competitive games." 

Continued on Page 3 



D00LEY '13, WATT, 
RYAN AS SPEAKERS 

Convocation speakers for the month 
of January were announced today as 
follows: 

Jan. 7. Thomas P. Dooley 13, head 
of the agricultural department in 
Jamaica Plains High school, speaking 
on "Relationship of Vocational Work 
in Secondary Schools to College." 

Jan. 14. Robert J. Watt, secretary- 
treasurer of the Mass. State Federa- 
tion of Labor, who spoke last year. 

Jan. 21 Dr. William P. Ryan of 
Holyoke. Commander of the Dept. 
of Mass. American Legion. 



Flying Club Plans 
Regular Meetings 

At the first meeting of the M.S.C. 
Flying Club, held last Thursday even- 
ing at the Phi Sigma Kappa house 
with fifteen prospective members at- 
tending, Thomas Hennessy '38 was 
elected president, and Robert Murphy 
'39 secretary. 

Hennessy, organizer of the club, 
outlined the plans for the coming year, 
pointing out the work that is to he 
done in conjunction with the Smith 
and Amherst Flying Clubs. 

Meetings will be held regularly each 
month. The next meeting is to be held 
Wednesday, January 6, at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Phi Sigma Kappa house. More mem* 
bers are needed. Any four-year student 
desiring membership may join at that 
time. There is no fee required. 



Copyright 19>6, Liccrrr * Mybm Tobacco Co. 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 17. I93U 



/Ifoaseacbuse 




Collegian 



Official newn-aper of the Masaa chu<*tt» State College. Published every Thursday by the students . 

LOUIS A. BREAULT '37, Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK L1NDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTER Gl'RALNICK -37. Associate Editor 



A./4 




Campus 
PH1LI1' B. SH1IK "87, Editor 
RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 
JAMBS s. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 38 
MAURICE TONKIN '38 
THOMAS J BNRIGHT '39 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '•'» 
MABELLE BOOTH '39 
BETTINA HALL '38 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWICZ '40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS '40 
NANCY E LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART 40 
SUSAN I'.STITSMAN '40. Secretary 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 
JULIAN H. KATZEFF 38, Editor 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 
ALFRED M. SWIREN '38 
JOHN E. FILIOS "40 
ARTHUR A- NOYES '40 

Muke-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37, Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

Stockbridge Correspondents 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 
WESLEY NUTTER S'3s 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



AND THEY DID 

When two college inebriates crack up 
their car in negotiating the torturous 
Notch, anything can happen. Last 
week when it DID happen, a group of 
good Samaritans who chanced along soon 
after the accident sought to administer 
first aid to a man who was lying injured 
on the ground. They were interrupted 
in the midst of their ministrations by 
the approach of the injured man's com- 
panion. Tight as a beer barrel, he 
lurched up to the angels of mercy, his 
fists flying. 

"Shay," he commanded, "you leave 
my wife alone." 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37, Business Manager 

Business Assistants 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH 37. Circulation Mgr 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38, Subscription Mgr. 
WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 
M ITCHFI L F. NEJAME •» DONALD L. SILVERMAN '38 
ABRAHAM CARP ".» CHARI ES RODDA '39 
ALLEN GOV! 36 HENRY WINN 88 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday, Dec. 17 

8 p.m. Basketball, Middlebury 
at M.S.C. 

Friday, Dec. 18 

8:15 p.m. Basketball, M.I.T. at 

Boston 
8:00 p.m. Vic parties: Kappa 
Epsilon, Theta Chi, Alpha 
Gamma Rho. 
Social Dancing Class, Drill Hall 
Saturday, Dec. 19 

12 m. Christmas Recess 
Monday, Jan. 4 

8:00 a.m. All classes begin. 
Wednesday, Jan. 6 

3:30 p.m. Hockey, Union, here 
8:00 p.m. Winter Carnival De 
monstration and Movies, 
Stockbridge 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

JANUARY 25-FEBRUARY 3, 1937 



Monday, Jan. 25, 8-10 a.m. 



Ger27 
Eng69 
Hist 51 
Hist 5"> 
Math 51 I 
Milt 51 

Ec25 
Physch 26 

Fresh Course 
Phys Ed 3 
Bot 53 
Ent 51 
Home Ec 51 



G 26 Yeg 51 

102 Ag Ec 75 

110. 114 Au Hus91 111. 113 

G 28 Home Ec 75 EH |H 

MB B Math 91 M I'.V, 

DH A Mil 75 DUB I 

Monday, 10.15-12.15 p.m. 
G Aud. 26. 99 HO. HI 



113, in, 
Monday, 2-4 p.m. 



G Aud 
P Ed 
CH C 
EB K 

FL204 



Ent 77 
Land Arch 81 
Oleri 75 I 

Physiol 75 Micro 



Tuesday, Jan. 26, 8-10 a.m. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



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possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
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cation* or notices must be received at the Collegian 
office before 9 o'clock. Mo nday evening. Phone 132-W 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post 
Office Accepted for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917. 
authorized August 20. 1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North Street. 
Northampton. Mass. Telephone 5a4. 



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EDITORIAL 



Ed Note The following editorial appeared some time ago in 
the columns of the Berkshire Evening Eagle We believe it worthy 
of the consideration of students, faculty and administration of the 

college. 

"TIIK DAMNED FARMERS" 

Massachusetts State College, with entrance requirements 
and academic standards as rigid as most Eastern colleges may 
soon grant a Bachelor of Arts degree in addition to the traditional 
Bachelor of Science degree bestowed on students in the four-year 
course since 1871. The question is now before the trustees and 
the president, Dr. Hugh Potter Baker 

Established at Amherst in 1867 as a Federal land grant 
college the State-supported institution was known until 1931 as 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. For generations students at 
the college were known as "farmers" or the Aggies. As early 
as 1871 when the famous regatta was staged at Ingleside-on-tne- 
Connecticut, an agitated spectator, wondering whether Harvard 
or Brown was leading, yelled in surprise: 

"Why, it's the damned farmers." . 

And the popular belief has prevailed that graduates of the 
college were trained primarily for agricultural pursuits and re- 
turned to the soil. To be sure this belief has some basis m fact. 
Alumni connected with some form of agricultural endeavor are 
legion But- records of the college are startling. They reveal a 
host of alumni as educators, clergymen, newspaper men, doctors, 
lawyers bankers, brokers, industrialists and social workers. 

To graduates of the college, this apparently anomalous 
situation is readily understood. An explanation is due, however 
to the citizens of the Commonwealth at large. 

While the banner of agriculture was waving over the cam- 
pus there were insidious forces at work on the faculty and within 
the administration. Imagine such courses as music appreciation, 
Spanish, French, Latin, English, sociology, education, landscape 
architecture and economics at an agricultural college. And these 
courses have been popular and still are as a perusal of college 
records will show. But how were these courses included in the 
curriculum without a howl from Beacon Hill? The answer is 
simple. There was the simple hocus-pocus of prefixing "agricul- 
tural" to courses like economics and education. And too the 
charter says in effect that a liberal education should be provided 
for boys and girls of Massachusetts from homes of moderate 
circumstances. ... ^ . - . 

Frequently questions of this sort are agitated by under- 
graduate enthusiasm. But there is more to this problem than 
merely the sentiment aroused by youthful exuberance. It is to 
the credit of M.S.C. that she has trained many outstanding 
leaders in agriculture and allied sciences, but this State is no 
longer predominatingly agricultural. Within her confines live 
thousands of families of moderate circumstances dependent on 
industry. Their sons and daughters are just as much entitled to 
a liberal education and the degree that follows as they are en- 
titled to an agricultural education. The great majority of States 
in the Union, many of them agricultural States, provide great 
universities. In New England, there are the Universities of 
Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire. New Jersey has Rutgers. 
Other States in addition to agricultural colleges have colleges 
offering education in the arts and sciences. 

For generations, the administration admitting that the 
charter sought to provide some culture for students at the agri- 
cultural college included liberal coursc-s. Then came the change 
in name to correct what was long conceded a misnomer. The 
question now arises: Why not take the next logical step suggested 
by the change in name? 



Dissertation on Nutcriiekinji 

If you have nuts to crack and no 
nutcracker to crack them with, don't 
use your teeth— every time you do so 
your neighborhood dentist chortles 
quietly to himself. And don't mangle 
the nut by whamming it with the 
heel of your size 13 trilbie, either. Be 
delicate. Just take the nut in your 
hand, shamble over to the window, 
remove any unnecessary window 
weights, raise the window and allow 
it to drop squarely and firmly upon 
the nut. If the window drops clear 
through the floor, don't worry. The 
cement floor in the cellar will stop it. 
If it doesn't, then your next resort is 
an elementary application of the lever 
made famous in Physics 25. 

Walk over to the door. Grasp the 
door firmly by the knob and then 
ouvrez la porte. If the door is right- 
handed, take the nut in your left mitt 
and drop it into the door jamb. At 
the same time, as we say in French, 
je Cadore. Presto. The nut is satis- 
factorily emaciated. With continued 
practice, you can mash the nut before 
it drops more than eight inches; the 
only risk incurred is the possibility of 
also mashing your frazzled fingers. 
(We might add that there's very little 
risk involved there — it's practically 
a certainty). 

Now, if in the course of the nut- 
cracking the door pops off the hinges, 
there's only one thing to do: go out 
and call a carpenter. And while he is 
restringing the door, you can use his 
hammer to good advantage. Failing 
in that, perhaps you had better look 
defeat straight in the eye and go out 
and buy yourself a nut-cracker. 



Announcements 



Eng 25 
Hurt Mfg 51 
Phil 61 

Pttyi 51 

An Hus 75 
Bot 81 



Aud 

HM 110 

113. 114 

PL B 

102 

CH B 



Cbem 79 
Knu 79 
Fren 71 
Home Ec 89 
Home Ec 83 



Fife 



Tuesday 

Eng 1 
Mr. Goldberg 

EB K. D 

Mr. Helming F Uft 

F209 



10.15-12.15 p.m. 

Miss Horrigan 
Mr. Prince 
Mr. Rand 
Mr. Troy 



i: 



no I 
111 



G M 



SENIORS 

Finished work on Senior pic- 
tures will be ready for distribution 
at the Index office in the "M" 
Building Thursday and Friday, 
Dec. 17 and 18 



Tuesday, 2-4 p.m. 



Agron 51 HI 

Wednesday, Jan 

Dairy 25 Fl 2U1 



Lost 

Lost in front of S. S. Hyde Co., Op- 
tician on Pleasant St., a brown bag 
with zipper top containing shirts and 
toilet articles. 

These are the property of Norman A. 
McLowd. Finder please return to S. S. 
Hyde Co. and receive reward. 



4-II Club Party 

The Massachusetts State College 
4-H Club will hold a Christmas party 
in the Farley Club House on Friday 
evening, December 18, Dorothy Deca- 
tur, secretary of the oragnization, an- 
nounced today. The party is scheduled 
to start at 7:30 p.m. 

Each member is requested to bring a 
ten cent gift. 



Draw 31 
Ag Ec 55 
Chem 51 
Ec 51 
Ed 67 
Eng 65 I 
Eng 65 II 
Flori 51 

Wednesday 
German 1, 5 
Mr. Ellert 



Eng 51 

, 27, 8-10 a.m. 
Glt 81 

Math 53 
Mmtc 61 
Phys Ed 57 
Ent 79 

Land Arch 7.3 
Phys Ed 77 
Phytcb 85 



Wll 

102 

G Aud 

G28 

111. 113 

110 

HM 110 

F 106 

10.15-12.15 p.m. 
25 Mr. Julian 

G 26, 28 Mr. Lyle 

Wednesday, 2-4 p.m. 
An Hus 1 110 Bot 63 

Hort 1 F 209 Ent 53 

Soc 27 I & II 113, 114 Hort Mfg II 
Thursday, Jan. 28, 8-10 a.m 



M Bl 



EBU 

WH Bl 
HE* I 

1H 



Chem 31 
Zool 25 
Bact 61 
Chem 61 
Eng 55 
Ent 55 
Oleri 51 
Phys Ed 73 



G Aud 

EB D 

CH A 

G26 

114 
EB H 

F 2<>9 
P Ed 



Zool 69 
Bot 77 
Dairy 75 
Ec79 
Flori 75 
Pom 75 
Poult 75 
Span 75 



us, ui 

i hb| 

HM 

ebfI 
<:hb| 



1 



1. 1131 
F lWl 

\ 

I 

F KM 



Vespers 

Vespers service will be held Jan. 10 
in the Memorial Building Mr. W. J. 
Kitchen, secretary of the Student 
Christian Movement, will discuss the 
project. 



Thursday, 10.15-12.15 p.m. 
Bot 1 CH A. EB D 

Thursday, 2-4 p.m. 



("hem 1. 3. 25 

Friday, Jan 
CH A 



IS T1IKRK A SLOT MACHINE IN 
THE CROWD? 

I- isn't our province to comment 
on the beautiful concert fciveii by 
the Don Cossacks, but we'd fcive a 
penny to anyone who can £ucs* 
the thoughts of the magnificently 
bearded centerpiece Cossack when 
he espied that scraggy-bearded 
frosh who was sitting in the 
balcony. 

Ry the way, that frosh ought to 
have a very happy New Year when 
(and IF) he cashes in on that 
14-buck spinach-growing bet. 



RAY STATE REVl E 

Continued from Page 1 
sins; Scaphio, a judge of the Supreme 
Court, Ronald Tucker; Phantis, a sec- 
ond judge, of the Supreme Court, Nor- 
man Grant; Tarara, public exploder, 
Milton Auerbach; Lord Dramaleigh, 
Roger Lindsey; Captain Fitzbattle- 
axe, John Osman; Captain Cocoran, 
David Tappan; Mr. Goldbury, Gor- 
don Najar; Princess Zara, Alma Boy- 
den; Princess Wekaya, Barbara Keck; 
Princess Kabyba, Barbara Strode; 
Lady Sopley, Marian Maschin. 



Bot as 

An Hus 73 
Bot 59 
Be 55 

Eng 71 
Home Ec 61 
Chem 75 
Ec 75 



110 

CH B 

G 98 

111, 113 

316 

(, 95 

109 



G Aud 
29, 8-10 a.m. 

Ent 75 

Land Arch S3 
Math 75 
Phys Ed 75 
Poult 77 
Psyi li 89 
Soc 75 
Vet 75 



Wll 1 
MB. 4 1 
P.Ecl 
I 

"I 
S!xr.| 

VLB I 



Friday, 10.15-12.15 p.m. 



Fren 1. 5. 7. 31 
Mr. Franker 

F 209, F 210 
Miss Healy 

F 102, F 106 

Friday. 

Eng 29 Ha, Ilia 114 
Eng 29 VIHb. IXb 

G 26 

Saturday, Jan 

Ec53 111.113 

Gcr 55 G 98 

Hist 53 114 

Math 55 MBB 

Phys 53 PL B 

Phys Ed 53 P Ed 

Saturday. 10.15-12.15 p.m. 
Hist 1 113.114.110. Orient 1 G Aud i ( 
111. 102, 201A 



Mr. (ioding 

EB D, EE 
Eng 29 Via I 

Eng 29 Vllb I 

2-4 p.m. 

Eng 29 
Mr. Dow I 

Mr. Lyle G Aud 

. 30, 8-10 a.m. 

Phys Ed 55 I' &:| 

Phys Ed 59 Pal 

Pom 53 F BJ 

Ent 81 EBKl 

Home Ec 87 I 



Ed 65 I & II F.UD i\ 



Saturday, 2-4 p.m. 



Tuesday. 10.15-12.15 p.m. 
Bact 91 KB D. K 




Hockey Team Reports 

The hockey team, under the leader- 
ship of Capt. Norberg, have reported 
and drawn their equipment. They 
will not take to the ice, however, until 
after the holiday vacation. 

There are several of last year's 
lettermen back, among them are: 
Capt. Norberg, D. Baldwin, A. Merino 
and W. Prindle. Prospect* for a 
successful season are at hand. The 
first game will be played on the home 
ice against Deerfield Academy on 
Jan. 8, with the second game being 
played at home, Jan. 13, with Williston 
furnishing the opposition. 

Captains Elected 

By the vote of the lettermen on 
their respeclive teams the captains of 
the football and cross country learns 
were elected early this week. 

Krnie Fournier. this year's stellar 

hark, was chosen to lend the foot- 

hallers for the 1938 season, while the 

Continued on Page 4 



Ag Eng 80 
Flori S3 
For S7 
Fruit SI 
Poult St 
Soils S5 

Home Ec 1 
Mil 1 



113 

K 102 
K 106 
K 210 
201 A 
102 

Tuesday 

G 2.X 
< ; Aud 



■« Mm SI 

For S29 
Fruit S7 
Hort S3 
Poult H 
Rur Soc SI 

2-4 p.m. 

Mil 25 



Bact SI CH A An Hus S5 

For S9 F 210 Ag Eng S3 

Yeg Gd SI 9 102 An Eng 19 

Wednesday, Feb. 3, 8-10 a.m. 

(>ol 81 EB B Ec 81 

Mori 51 Wll I Ed SO 

B.k t Ml Micro Bldg 



111 
WH B 

F 210 

F 209 

312 

114 

KB D 



102 
114 
110 

114 

110 



Draw 25 
Hist 27 
Poult 25 
Ag Eng 71 
An Hus 51 
Ent 57 



Dairy SI KL 204 Ag Eng S7 102 

Flori SI F 102 Beekeeping SI EB K 

Wednesday, 10.15-12.15 p.m. 
folic* 85 PL B, (II A 

Ac Eng SI 114 Fruit SI F 109 

Wednesday, 2-4 p.m. 

Math 1 Mr. Miller P 102. 209 

Mr. B.mtelle Mr Moore MB B, G 

IH D. K Mr IHMM G 26, 28 

Mr. Msraten And 

By arrangement 
An Bi 89 Phys Ed 71 

Ag Enis s ">. 85 I'hys Rd <>l. 51 

Aii'on 77 Pkyi 75. 88 

An rim 81 I'mu Bl s:t 

Kn! 85, *7 I 'null VI 

Home Be 77 Sin 77 

Il..rt Mfg 81, 71 /nol s.-. 91 



Hist 25 
Ag Ec 71 
Eng 57 
Math 51 II 
Music 51 
Phys Ed 51 
Plant Brd 51 



Wll 
113 
312 
110 
102 
EB K 

Monday, Feb 

114 

201 A 

110 

MBG 

M Bldg 

PEd 

F 210 



Zool 65 I & II 
Bact 85 Mi 
Dairy 77 
Flori Hi 
Hort Mfg 75 

1, 8-10 a.m. 

Poult 51 
Psv. h 51 
Soc 51 
Span 51 
Dairy 79 
Ec 85 
Ed 79 



Agric SI G 26 

S.ils SI G Aud. 2S 

An Hus S3 113 

Gen Biol S21 EB D Poult) 

Monday, 10.15-12.15 p.m. 

MB B. 0. * 




S PORTS 




S1EVERS TO LEAD M.S.C. 
FOOTBALLERS NEXT FALL 







EBC-I 

. in Bliiil 

FL2KI 

?M 

UM : 



I 

S Stcl 

F 10*1 

I 

\ 



Hort S7 r-J 

Hort Mfg SI H M | 
Vet SI (Dairy B 



Math 27 

Ag Opport SI 
Hygiene S3 
Ag Ec SI 
Bus F'ng SI 

Hygiene 1 
Ag Eng 51 
An Hus 53 
Land Arch 51 
Ag E. 79 
An Hus SI 
F"or S5 
Fruit SI 

lli.tt SI 

Poult SI 



110 

G And 

114 

113 



Flori S7 
Law Sl!5 
Yeg 04 S3 



Monday, 2-4 p.m. 



G And 

111 

no 
WH 

113 

I I I 

EB K 

F 210 

F 909 

312 



Hi 



Bot 75 

Flori 79 
Home E 
/iu>l 75 
Dairy S3 
Flori S5 
l-oi S3 

Fun Mgt Bl 

I'niilt S7 



Tuesday, Feb. 2, «- 10 a.m. 

II,,,,,,. |> 25 II I F"i 89 

r)l,. r i 25 F 910 Mlttfc 78 



Kl'l 

I 



CHll 

1 ' 

I • 
I 



I 



Mu- 



1 



IM. <i", 



BtH Liu St 

Breed 86 
Bui M«t s:s 

| Foi S27 

I 



And 98 

312 

102 

P 108 



Fruit S9 F 

\ it 91 (An II 



wed from Page 1 

\,, thing, he remarked, teaches these 
lovfllti f as quickly as participation in 
gporta, especially in games which call 
, i d and bodily contact. 
Seven Eoiindations 

"Good sportsmanship resta on seven 
fouit'htions. Let one be weak or miss- 
ing and the whole structure becomes 
wa rped. M The first requisite, according 
i„ Mr. Keane, is to keep the rules. 
Tin 1 rules of the game, the laws of man, 
tin Law* °f hfe, and the laws of God 
njust he learned and obeyed to avoid 
the payment of penalties. 

I ,iith must be kept with your team- 
matea • • • y° u must do your share of 
the work whatever the project." 

( ontinuing the foundations of 
sportsmanship, the speaker listed the 
oeceanty for keeping the temper and 
remaining physically fit. Stout-heart- 
edness in defeat and the avoidance of 
s\v. !l headedness were given as other 
requisites, Mr. Keane stressed the idea 
Of b sound body and a clean mind, 
statinf that "the healthy body fosters 
the dean mind, and both combine to 
make a sound soul." 

In conclusion, Mr. Keane summed 
up the seven foundations of good 
sportsmanship into one message, the 
message implied by the Golden Rule. 



45 Enrolled For 
New Ski Course 



The Physical Education department 

announces that we are now one of the 

lew colleges offering a course in skiing. 

I At present there are forty-five students 

I enrolled in this elective course. 

At present the class is going through 
I dry course practice in the cage. This 
iionditioning is one of the fundamen- 
tals of skiing. After vacation, if 
there is sufficient snow, there will be 
optn instruction to all every Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday 
afternoons from 1 to 5 p.m. on Clark 
Hill. Later on there will also be 
instructions for first aid for ski in- 
juries 



Sextet Opposes 
Union in Opener 

Handicapped by lack of practice, 
the State hockey sextet, will open the 
Wednesday following vacation against 
Union, on the College Pond. Little is 
known of the local team or of the 
ability of the New Yorkers, but Union 
has had a great deal more practice 
than Coach Ball's charges have been 
able to put in between warm spells. 

With many lettermen back from 
last year's squad, Ball has a tried man 
for every position except the defense 
post held down last year by Captain 
Fred Murphy. The nets will be well 
taken care of this year by Al Ingalls, 
present captain, capably understudied 
by Sophomore Clifton Morey. David 
Rossiter will fill in one of the defense 
positions while the other is still wide 
open. John Lavrakas and David 
Mildram are back for first line duty 
with Norman Linden and Dick Towle, 
lettermen, both fighting for a ranking 
spot. Crawford Adams, another mem- 
ber of the second line a year ago, has 
a good chance of breaking into first 
line work. 

Scheduled to face Union last year, 
the game was called because of thin 
ice. As a result, Wednesday's game 
will be the first meeting with Union on 
the rink in recent sport history. 



Winter Traek Managership 

All candidates for assistant mana- 
ger of winter track please report in 
the cage at 4:30 this afternoon. 
Candidates must be freshmen. 



Although the course is open to all, 
freshmen and sophomores who elect 
skiing to finish out the semester after 
the completion of fall sports will earn 
one credit for the course. 



BETTER LATE 
TWAN NEVER/ 

WASHINGTON AND LEE 
UNIVERSITY AWARDED* 
COL WARREN WH If SIDE 
Hlf BACHELOR OF .SCIENCE 

DEGREE LAST JUNE, 
JU9T 38 YEARS LATE/ 

C0L.WHITSIDE LEFT 

SCHOOL A MONTH BE- 
FORE HI? GRADUATION 

TO TAKE PART IN 
THE SPANISH AMERICAN 

••• WAR • 
HE REMAINED WITH 

THE REGULAR ARMY 
AND THE UNIVERSITY DID 

NOT LEARN OF THE 
PECULIAR CIRCUMSTANCES 

UNTIL LAST SPRING' 





4* r 



THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF 
FOULS IN A BASKETBALL 
6AME IS 22 / 

( »«iii b» SIMMS' Ciillcjuu h«ii-M«*w. Wiitimiin 




NIGW 
0WLS7 



THE TEMPLE 
OWLS PLAYED 
NIGHT GAMES 
FOR 7 YEARS 
BEFORE DROPPING 
THEIR FIRST 
NIGHT CONTEST 
THIS YEAR/ 



THOSE KKCOKDS AGAIN 

Every year with the opening of the 
winter track and swimming seasons 
athletes look hopefully at the existing 
pool and cage records, record-holding 
graduates and undergraduates glance 
fearfully at their laurels, while sport 
fans look approvingly on champion 
and competitor alike. With the State 
winter season about to get under way, 
both swimming and track records are 
in danger as coaches Derby and Rogers 
vision more representative teams than 
a year ago. 

Swimming 

Outstanding tankmen, Co-captains 
James Cutter and Walt Hodder al- 
ready hold college records and should 
take a few seconds off their time in 
their last year of college competition. 
Cutter holds the 220 and 440-yard 
free-style records and until two weeks 
ago had turned in the best time in the 
100-yard free-style. George Pitts, 
freshman swimming ace, cracked Cut- 
ter's record in the Soph- Frosh meet 
but his time of 55.5 does not loom as 
a serious threat to the varsity man 
Already this season, according to 
Coach Rogers, Cutter has broken three 
free-style marks in practice without 
extending himself. Hodder, outstand- 
ing in one event, the 200-yard breast- 
stroke, has established a college mark 
of 2:41.3 and should be able to get 
the record into the high thirties before 
the tankmen hang up their five square 
inches of rubber swim-suits. Other 
State record holders include: Rounds, 
Hodder and Lothrop in the 300-yard 
medley relay turning in the fast time 
of 3:17.5; Tirrell in the 50-yard free- 
style with 25.3; Rounds in the 150- 
yard backstroke posting 1:49.7; and 
the 400-yard free-style relay record of 
3:51.8 held by Fisher, Rounds, Cutter 
and Lothrop. 

Track 

Seventeen events, ranging from the 
35-yard dash to the 35-pound weight, 
make up indoor track competition. 
As track records go back to one Samp- 
son's shot-put heave in 1913, the 
chances of a new cage record are not 
as great as they are in swimming. 
Captain Ted Thacker, holder of the 
300-yard run mark at 35s, will be out 
to put his record further away from 
grasping future competitors and rates 
a good chance of doing so. Jack 
Dobby, another member of this year's 
relay team, holds two indoor track 
marks, running a 57.4 quarter and 
hitting 1:21.2 in the 600-yards. Bill 
Leighton will have his last chance to 
break his 4.8 40-yard dash record this 
winter. Of all the records, 1913's 
Sampson seems most likely to keep 
his, having posted a 44' 6 3-4" mark 
that has withstood twenty-three years 
of grunting and heaving. 

Other records include: 35-yard dash, 
4.2, Guenard; 50-yard dash, 5.6, 
Guenard; 220-yard dash, 26.6, War- 
ren; 880-yard run, 2:12, Stepat; 
1000-yard run, 2:26.4, Schappelle; 
mile-run, 4:46.6, Stepat; 2-mile run, 
10:39, Murray and Gillette; 35-yard 
high hurdles, Pruyne, 4.9; high jump, 
5' 8 3-4", Kennett; broad jump, 22' 
3 1-2", Shaw, pole vault, 11', Ryan; 
and 35-pound weight, 44' 6", Gu- 
zowski. 



To Vie Here for 
'37 Valley Title 



MIDDLEBURY GAME HERE 
OPENS SEASON TONIGHT 



A- T. Wilson W. E. Londsrgan 

THE KINGSBURY PRESS 
Printers and Publishers 

T*Upbon« 564 Northampton. Ml 




LEFTY" BARR, Basketball Captain 



Plans for holding a Connecticut 
Valley intercollegiate cross-country 
championship meet at M.S.C. next 
fall were announced yesterday by 
Llewellyn L. Derby,\ cross-country 
coach. The meet which will be the 



Climaxing all pre-season practice 
and all pre-season predictions about 
the future of the basketball team, the 
first Frigard-coached basketball team, 
captained by I^efty Barr, will take the 
floor tonight against Middlebury Col- 
lege. The game will be played in the 
cage at 8 p.m. and the team will travel 
to M.I.T. tomorrow. Since it is the cur- 
tain raising performance by the hoop- 
men this season, fans will have their 
first chance to see the team in action. 

With all of last year's team back, 
except for Captain Stewart, Coach 
Bill Frigard attaches more than usual 
significance to this first game against 
the Vermonters. Although the record 
of last year's team was disappointing 
he hopes that the hoopmen will show 
up to better advantage this winter. If 
the quintet clicks and shows the scor- 
ing punch that it has in practice, to- 
night's game may foreshadow a good 
season. 

In the opening game played with 
Middlebury last year at home ths 
Taubemen were defeated 30-17 in a 
contest which didn't turn in State's 
direction at any point. The Middle- 
bury outfit was composed entirely of 
veterans. 



first one of its kind in this part of ths 
country, will be conducted by Amherst 
and State Colleges jointly. 

Nine colleges are expected to con- 
tend next fall for harrier honors on 
the State College course. Invitations 
are at present being sent to Wi'sleyan, 
Williams, Coast Guard, Springfu-ld, 
Connecticut State, Trinity, and Ameri- 
can International colleges 

The meet will be held on Monday, 
Nov. 1, 1937. This is the Monday 
following the State-Amherst foot hall 
game. It has been scheduled at that 
time rather than on Saturday so ;i.» 
not to conflict with the football con- 
test between the town rivals. 



The starting line-up will no doubt be 
composed mainly of last year's veter- 
ans. The probable starting line-up 
will include Captain I^efty Barr at 
right forward, who, it is expected, will 
continue his last year's high scoring 
performance. The other forward posi- 
tion will Ik? occupied by Kd Czelus- 
niak. Jump man will probably ho John 
Bush. Ix,'ft guard position is still a toss- 
up between Sievers, Putnam, and Zc- 
lazo. Although Zelazo is 9 sophomore 
he may be a starter in preference to t he 
two veterans because of his very good 
showing in the practice s« -rimmages. 
Other men who may see service are 
Eldridge and Rustigan as forwards, 
Southwick as guard or center, and pos- 
sibly Bokina, who is at present out 
with a sore ankle. 

Coach Frigard is going to use a fast 
breaking basketball system, as a re- 
sult of which there will lie frequent 
substitutions, especially when StstS 
takes the lead. 

On Friday the team travels to tne.t 
M.I.T. at Boston. M.I.T. is reputed to 
have one of its weakest teams in recent 
history, and the Statesmen will !><• out 
to avenge last year's 31*80 loss to the 
Technicians. 



NEW BLECTEIC LIGHTS 

AT OOLUBUB POM) 

When twilight shadows deepen 
"Aggie Pond" will bs reflected in a 
myriad of light that is, if present 
plans are completed in time. Light 
will come from four 2(HM) randle 
power bulbs suspended from four steel 
poles 80*36 feet high at each extremity 
of the pond. The poles will he de- 
tachable from stevl underground sock 
ets that are in the process of being 
installed now, and will be removed 
after the winter season. 

In the past the pond lias lieen hut 
dimly lighted from two low wooden 
poles. As these poles wire thought to 
interfere with the beauty of tbe Stilt 
lands.ape, they were yearly removed 



Ai3dvs oaDiw irnj 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLBOIAN. Till RSDAY, l>K< KMIHK 17, lttSti 



5 



THE 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 17, 1936 



LAMBDA DELTA MU DANCE 
FIRST OF PLEDGE FORMALS 



Other Sororities Prepare 
for Formals in January 



Seventy-four people attended the 
first pledge formal of the year given 
by Lambda Delta Mu at the Hills 
Memorial Club house. The music was 
furnished by Dick Minnott's orches- 
tra. 

The other pledge formals are sched- 
uled as follows: Alpha Lambda Mu, 
Saturday, Jan. 16; Phi Zeta, Jan. 8; 
Sigma Beta Chi, Friday, Jan. 8. 
Thone Attending 

The following is the list of those 
attending the Lambda Delta Mu 

formal: 

Bettina Hall, Kenneth Higgins; 
Shelagh Crowley, Clifford Curtis; 
Hetty Jasper, David Belcher of Spring- 
field; Dorothea Donnelly, Fred Davis; 
Esther Smith, Allen Ingalls; Kay 
Spaight, Al Paige; Christine Stewart, 
Edward Morin; Louise Rutter, Ed- 
ward Meade. 

Mabelle Booth, Donald Tucker; 
Sarah Wilcox, Everett Roberts '37; 
Dorothy Nichols, Philip Chase; Mar- 
jorie Harris, Robert McCarthy; Julia 
Lynch, Robert Cain; Phyllis Mac- 
Donald, George Pitts; Molly Mad- 
docks, Clifford Lippincott; Kay Rice, 
Hill Riley; Loretta Kenny, David 
Mildram; Ethel Meurer, Morris Reid 
of Springfield. 

Barbara Miller, Miller Nichols of 
Springfield; Helen Shaw of Foxboro, 
Charles Rodda; I,ee West, William 
Goodwin; Betty Eaton, Raymond 
Casler of Worcester; Carol Julian, 
Edward O'Brien of Amherst; Eleinor 
Julian. William Bullock; Sylvia Rus- 
s.-ll, Herbert Tetreault; Marjorie 
Smith, Robert Dunn, Helen Pelissier, 
Norman Clark. 

Marian Becher, Fred Watson; Doro- 
thy Merrill, Everett Roberts '39; 
Marjorie Johnson, Stanley Wiggin; 
Marjorie Wilcox, Norman Linden; 
Patricia Morse, Jack Merrill; Ruth 
Wood, Russell Hauck; Betty Kenyon, 
William Fitzpatrick; Dorothy Nurmi, 
George Monroe; Virginia Pease, 
George Nettleton; Betty Warner. 
Hal Griffin. 



Phi /eta 

The annual Christmas party was 
held at the house Sunday. The ad- 
visers, patronesses, members and 
pledges were present. Gifts were ex- 
changed. The patronesses presented 
the sorority with a silver tea pot. 

Last Friday night a "vie" party was 
held at Phi Zeta for members and 
pledges. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ellert, 
Miss Pauline Hillberg, and Mr. Alvis 
S. Ryan were the chaperones. 

The Philum, Phi Zeta Alumnae 
Bulletin, has been edited this week by 
Roberta Walkey, editor, and Con- 
stance Fortin, assistant editor. 

The pledges of Phi Zeta gave a 
cocoa party for the pledges of other 
sororoties last Thursday afternoon. 

Officers were elected in the pledge 
meeting this week. Kay Leet was 
elected president, Louise Bowman, 
vice-president, and Millicent Car- 
penter, secretary. 



Press Members 
Visit Greenfield 

The Mass. State College Press Club 
recently visited the remodeled plant of 
the Greenfield Recorder-Gazette as the 
first of a series of trips to nearby news- 
paper offices. The trips are part of a 
program to learn first-hand some of the 
operations and methods that go into 
newspaper work, both from the writ- 
ing and printing standpoints. Plans 
are under way to have outstanding 
newspapermen as speakers for future 
meetings. 

Officers of the club elected recently 
are: Charles E. Eshbach '37, president; 
and Stanley A. Flower '38, secretary. 
New memhers elected to the group 
this year include Frederick B. Lind- 
strom '38, Walter Guralnick '37, Ray- 
mond Jordan '37, Mary P. O'Connell 
'38, and Janet Campbell '40. Francis C. 
Pray, head of the College News Ser- 
vice, is faculty adviser. 



fraternities 



Officers of Lambda Chi Alpha for 
the coming year were elected Monday 
night. Norman Blake '38 was chosen 
president; Donald Cowles '39, vice- 
president; James King '39, secretary; 
and Robert Lyons '38, treasurer. 



Young Prophesies 
Fixed Population 



Alpha Lambda Mu 

A Christmas party was held Mon- 
day night. The climaxing event of 
the evening was the cutting of a 
seven-decker cake by Barbara Clark 
'37. 



NEW COLLECTION 
FOR RECORD CLUB 



Sigma Itetu Chi 

Sigma Beta Chi gave a dinner for 
the pledges Monday evening. This 
dinner was followed by the pledge pin 
ceremony. After the meeting a Christ- 
mas party was held for members, 
pledges and patronesses. 

The patronesses made a Christmas 
present of an electric mixer to the 
house. 

A tea was given at Mrs. Machmer's 
last Sunday afternoon to members and 
pledges. 

A "vie" party will be held at the 
Machmer's Friday evening. 



Robinson Speaks at 
Christmas Vespers 

"Fascism and the Christmas spirit 
cannot but be opposed the one to the 
other," said Dr. Edwin B. Robinson, 
minister of Grace Church, Holyoke, 
speaking at Vespers service Sunday. 
Dr. Robinson denounced Fascism as 
the enemy of true religion, and probab- 
ly its most dangerous enemy. 

Saying that he realized fully that the 
Christmas stories in the Gospels are 
often a cause of bewilderment if not of 
dismay to students in college, Dr. Rob- 
inson explained that "When properly 
understood as poetic tributes to the 
meaning of the incarnation of Jesus in 
the lives of these Christian authors, 
they are as vulnerable as they are beau- 
tiful, showing how varied were the 
fields of symbolism which were drawn 
upon to explain and illuminate reli- 
gious experiences which had come to 
them and to multitudes more." 

Dr. Robinson emphasized the God- 
ward aspect of the Christmas music, 
and suggested that the text was born 
of a joyful religious experience of men 
who has found peace in good will born 
of the life of God in them. 



Announcement of the acquisition 
of several new albums in the last two 
weeks was made by the Music Record 
Club. 

One of the most interesting of the 
new albums is a collection of excerpts 
from George Gershwin's newest opus, 
Porgy and Bess, sung by Lawrence 
Tibbett and Helen Jepson, both 
members of the Metropolitan Opera 
Association, under the direction of the 
able conductor, Alexander Smallens. 

The most unusual addition to the 
collection came to the Music Record 
Club as a gift from the Music House 
of Northampton. This album is a 
complete recording of the Etudes of 
Frederic Chopin, the outstanding 
Polish composer of the last century. 

A third album is the recording by 
Felix Weingartner and the Royal 
Philharmonic Symphony of Wein- 
gartner's transcription of Beethoven's 
"Hammerklavier" Sonata. 



"We may expect the population of 
New England to be stabilized by 1960 
at approximately nine millions of 
people," stated Walter S. Young, 
superintendant of schools in Worces- 
ter, Mass., in the last Convocation on 
December 10. 

"Think what this is going to mean 
in the mental attitude of the genera- 
tion who will control the affairs in 
1960," he continued. "It will no 
longer be a time of extension but 
rather a time of extensive improve- 
ment on the social and economic con- 
ditions within a static group." 

He added that this change in age of 
the workers will mean that annually 
there will be fewer business men to 
go into industry. It will mean that 
those who have already given their 
contribution to industry, to profes- 
sions, and to society in general will 
have an obligation to society. 

"In the year 1960 we will be in the 
prime of life with our working capacity 
at the greatest, so we have a challenge 
to meet conditions which do not now 
exist, but for which we should be pre- 
paring," he stated. 

He concluded that there is no train- 
ing given, worth the name, which 
cannot be appropriated by an indi- 
vidual for his own advancement and 
the good of the social order. 



Portrait Made 
of Butterfield! 



Elmer Greene, young Boston par, 
trait painter, was today commissioned! 
by a special alumni committee of iliJ 
college to paint a portrait of the latJ 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, president of thi| 
college from 1906 to 1924. 

A committee of alumni appointed by] 
Ralph F. Taber, president of the alumni 
association, have made arrangement, 
with Greene to complete the portrait 
sometime in March. Serving on the| 
committee are Louis W.Ross of Bost .n 
Stewart B. Foster of Framinghun I 
Miss Eleanor Bateman of Boston, ;»nd| 
Prof. Clark L. Thayer. 

Butterfield, who died in 1935, w;ts a | 
member of the original Country Life 
Commission appointed by Tbaodanj 
Roosevelt, and became known as the 
father of the country life movement i n | 
America. 



RELIGIOUS CLUBS 
NEWLY FORMEDl 

The Wesley Foundation, a club lor 
Methodist students, and the Phillip 
Brooks club for Episcopalian stud. ml 
have formed on this campus, James Let| 
'38 was elected president of the Wes- 
ley club, and John Balcomb president! 
of the Phillip Brooks club. These twJ 
clubs are a part of the Christian led 
eration. The presidents of the clubs 
are members of the Federation Coua-J 
cil. 



STOCKRRIIXiE 

Continued front Page 1 
harriers split their vote equally to 
elect co-captains Larry Bearce and 
Bud Hammond. 



some artificial snow fell through the 
hot air grating and caused a .slight 
smudge. The town fire chief uponj 
investigation soon assured the mem- 
bers that all was well. The chiel w;i.;| 
ably assisted by Eugene McDonough. 
now dubbed as the "Phantom Fire| 
Chief." 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



LIKE WINTER SPORTS? 

Come in and see our line of sporting equipment 
SKATES $2.95 and $4.95 pr. 



SKIIS 
POLES 
BINDINGS 
HOCKEY STICKS 
ATHLETIC SOCKS 



8.00 pr. 

2.50 pr. 

2.98 pr. 

75c and 1.00 ea. 

25c pr. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



WINTER CARNIVAL 

Continued from Page 1 

will be crowned later at the snow 

pageant . 

Carnival Rully 

On Wednesday evening, January 6, 
a carnival rally will be held in Bowker 
Auditorium. Last year's carnival 
movies will be shown and it is planned 
to include other carnival and skiing 
pictures. A local ski dealer will 
exhibit equipment and a speaker from 
Dartmouth has been invited. 

The carnival prom committee is 
already planning its portion of the 
carnival. Chairman Herbert Glick 
'39 and assistants Ruth Wood '38, 
Norman Blake '38, Fred Sievers '38, 
Robert Packard '39, and Howard 
Steff '39 have assured the presentation 
Friday evening, February 12 and 
orchestra negotiations are under way. 



Ilort Club 

The regular meeting of the Stock- 
bridge Horticulture Club will be held 
Thursday evening at 7:30 in Wilder 
Hall. Prof. S. C. Hubbard of the 
floriculture department will give an 
illustrated lecture on rose and perren- 
nial growing — with lantern slides. 



Alpha Tau Gumma 

A.T.G. held a very successful "vie" 
party last Saturday evening; about 
thirteen couples were present. The 
chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. A. 
Tuttle and Mr. and Mrs. R. Trippen- 
see. 

A slight fire scare resulted when 



Kolony Klub 

A committee has been appointed I 
with Eugene Provenzani as chairman 
to make plans for a Christmas party 
to be held Thursday, Dec. 17, at the | 
house for club members only. 

Freshmen received their second de- 
gree initiation in Greenfield, Tuesday. 



We still have a 
LARGE LINE OF GIFTS 

Well varied in 
style, price and use. 

miss Cutlers Gift SDop 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

GEANDCNICCVT 

RESTAURANT 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
Foods and Beverages 

Dine, Wine and Dance 



HYGEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



APACITY AUDIENCE PLEASED Campus Obtains SEARS TO CONTINUE WORK AT 



BY DON COSSACK'S PROGRAM New Permanent 

Christmas Tree 



1> rtd by their diminutive, dynamic 
L a d«r Serg e Jaroflf, and featuring the 

tll pf whirling dancers, the Don 

lopgi ks performed before a capacity 

adience that thronged Bowker Audi- 

jrium to the very walls at the Social 

[nion on Saturday evening, Dec 



12. 



kntet 



Arrange Tentative 
Schedule for Band 



\rr.<nged in a semi-circle of soldierly 
in black tunics, red-striped 
and military boots, they pre- 
a dramatic picture which, 
jplt-d with their unusual quality of 
ging, made a very unique concert. 
Their program of Russian church 
(^je. folk songs, and Cossack selec- 
„is were accompanied by shrill 
haling and picturesque dancing 
hich aroused the audience to out- 
olu-n enthusiasm. 

The Climax 
The climax of the concert was the 
es pntation of the Second Prelude by 
thmaninoff arranged for the Cos- 
,ks by Schvedoff. The quality of 
t voice* lent itself most effectively 
the rendition of this famous com- 
bsition. Transposing the music from 
» to voice made an interesting 
ptriment and attained considerable 
pularity. 

The listeners expressed great amaze- 
nt at the unusual timbre of these 
n - vocal qualities. From the deli- 
le lalsetto to the resonant, deep 
ss, they ranged without apparent 
,rl [f they can be compared to 
musical instrument, it is the 
in. with its richness of tone and 
otional potentialities. 



A tentative schedule of band con- 
certs has been announced by the band. 
The spring season will be busier than 
last year with the innovation of play- 
ing at baseball games in Amherst. 

On Jan. 9, the band will play at the 
Bay State Revue. On the 14th they 
will give a concert at the Neurosychi- 
atric Institute in Hartford. They will 
also play at the Winter Carnival. 

Arrangements are being made for a 
radio broadcast the last part of 
February and later in the spring for a 
trip to Boston. The main feature 
here will be the Mother's Day con- 
cert. For these presentations, the 
repertoir is being rapidly increased 
and Mr. Farnum 
Medley and When 
Deepen. 



GRENFELL MISSION, LABRADOR 



is arranging the 
Twilight Shadows 



&'■• 



STIETES TALKS ON 
LIFE AND WORK OF 
LEONARDO DAVINC1 



With the moving of a perfectly 
formed balsam, the true Christmas 
tree, from the east side of Draper Hall 
to the west side of the pond last week 
by Harold Frost, a trustee of the college, 
the campus has finally obtained a per- 
manent centrally-located Christmas 
tree. This year a pine near the old 
chapel is being used. 

Moving of the tree was instigated 
by Superintendent Armstrong of the 
Grounds Service following the failure 
of a tree planted near the pond two 
years ago. 

A BSSfl (lift 

Two days were required to move the 
new tree with six men and special ma- 
chinery being employed. The work, 
valued at $250, was given to the col- 
lege as a gift by the firm of Frost and 
Higgins, of Arlington, with the actual 
work being supervised by Mr. Frost. 

Because of the dampness of the area 
where the present tree is set, it was 
necessary to excavate a hole twelve 
feet in diameter and four and one half 
feet deep. Six inches of crushed rock 
topped with fine loam were placed as a 
bed for the tree to rest on. 

Actual removal of the tree was 
viewed by various classes of the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture and the 
State College. In addition, observers 



One Month Remains 
In Symbol Contest 



Fret! C. Sears, retired head and pro- 
fessor of the department of Pomology 
at Massachusetts State College, has 
left Amherst to continue his work with 
Sir Wilfred Crenfell at the (Jrenfell 
Mission in Labrador, it was announced 
•lust one month remains before the hy Professor Van Meter of M 3.C. 
close of the contest for the selection At Present in * 'iiliforiiin 

of a suitable symbol for M.S.C., it was Professor Sears, who retired in 1936, 
pointed out by Secretary Robert I), is at the present time spending the win- 
Hawley yesterday. | ter in California. On his return to the 

Fast next year, he will stop off at Kan- 



Leonardo da Vinci was the topic of 
an address by Professor Raymond S. 
Stietes, head of the department of 



A novel feature was the introduction art and esthetics of Antioch College, 



the last selection of the whirling, 
imping, leaping Cossack dancers. 
?monst rating the joyous spirit and 
nine abandon of the Don Cossacks, 
I dancers aroused the audience to a 
h emotional pitch. 
The listeners were decidedly pleased 
the .mtics of the whistling, "yahoo- 
member of the group, who was 
■parent ly having as much fun as his 
tencra were. 

Ihn-kstnge Closeup 

Following the concert, many of the 

erested members of the audience 

iwded hack-stage for a close-up 

w of the colorful Cossacks, only to 

disappointed by the hurried de- 

turc of the singers, because of an 

ly Sunday appearance at Symphony 

II, Hoston. 

he man with the beard particularly 
riKued the feminine constituency of 
audience. But the greatest thrill 
e hackstage when he pulled a 
ical Cossack hat of brilliant scarlet 
of his beard and placed it at a 
ish angle on his head. 
hroughout the concert the haunt- 
harmonies and melancholy melo- 
Hr created an impression of a people 
ply emotional and greatly sad- 
ed by religious and political diffi- 
|ties. It was a sad picture of a 
up of people "without a country," 
lured by their fellow-countrymen 
attempting to recreate a pre-war 
lization in which they found life 
u.«t and colorful. 



given last Tuesday afternoon at the 
Fine Arts program. 

Illustrating his talk with slides pro- 
jected on the screen, Professor Stietes 
pictured da Vinci as an outstandingly 
well-rounded man. From his youth 
he was a great scientist and a great 
artist. As an example of his versa- 
tility, slides of his handwriting showed 
how he wrote, both backward and 
forward, with ease. 

Da Vinci's first known commission 
was an Epiphany picture for a group 
of monks near Florence. In this pic- 
ture are found many of the innova- 
tions in composition which da Vinci 
introduced into painting, such as the 
feeling of depth. It is rich in sugges- 
tive power. 

Flying from Florence when his 
name was mentioned in connection 
with a plot to overthrow the Medicis, 
da Vinci traveled to Milan, where he 
soon retired to a monastery. In a 
manuscript which dates from this 
period, he left a record of his life and 
thoughts during the following decade. 

Professor Stietes showed slides of 
various drawings made by Vinci which 
led to his production of the Last 
Supper. In this picture he pointed 
out that the faces of St. Peter and 
Judas are identical except in coloring. 
At the close of the lecture da Vinci's 
most famous picture, the Mona Lisa, 
was shown. The name by which this 
is commonly known is a mistake, 
Professor Stietes stated. If it is a 
portrait at all, it is not of Mona Lisa. 



Competition is open to all graduate 
students, undergraduates, and stud- 
ents of the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. Fntries should be placed 
in sealed envelopes and left with the 
Secretary of the College not later than 
, r i o'clock, .January 15, 1937. 



INDEX BUSINESS 
MANAGER NOTES 
MANY CHANGES 



Pictures of fraternity and sorority 
groups for this year's Index have been 
completed, it was announced yester- 
day by Mitchell NeJame '.'18, business 
manager. The pictures were taken in 



the Memorial Building against a 
were present from Amherst College and I natural background, and it is expected 



other institutions. 

I T r£e More Evergreens 

With the planting of the new ever- 
green at one side of the pond, the sug- 
gestion has been made that a similar 
tree be placed at the other end to pro- 
vide an attractive frame through 
which the buildings on the west side 
of the campus may be seen from the 
main road. 

In an effort to protect the grounds 
around the pond, signs have been 
posted forbidding automobiles to be 
parked on the grass near the edges by 
skaters. In the evening and on holidays, 
student officers are on duty at the pond 
to enforce the order. 

Other projects being undertaken by I hut arrangements will be made for 
the Grounds Service are the building of j these directly after the vacation, 
a gravel road as an approach to the new 



that they will be a considerable im 
provement over those done last year. 

Faculty hy Divisions 

This year the pictures of the faculty 
will appear in divisions, instead of in 
a single group, as has been the method 
in previous years. Another innovation 
will be the inclusion of photographs 
on the pages separating the various 
sections, instead of pen and ink draw- 
ings. The Index board intends to 
break away from the old style of cover, 
and will bring out a modernistic 
cover, worked in the college colors. 

Pictures of the academic organiza- 
tions on campus are yet to be taken, 



sas State Agricultural College for the 
annual reunion of the class of '9fi. 

Every summer since 192H Professor 
Sears has been working with Grenfell 
in the prevention of disease due to 
faulty nutrition. He was hailed as 
"Uncle Freddv" for his part in the in- 
struction of the inhabitants of Lab- 
rador as to the proper diet and the 
raising of fruits and vegetables. 
Honored by VMM Index 

In the dedication of the 1936 Index, 
high praise was bestowed upon Pro- 
fessor Sears by the students of M.S.C. 
as an expression of their appreciation 
and gratitude for his teaching, help 
and friendship. 

Sir Wilfred Crenfell also added his 
word of praise in a special letter to tho 
college and the editor of the Index. 
Quoting one of the volunteer workers 
at the mission, Sir Wilfred wrote: 
" 'Oh, would some power giftie gi'e us, 
To see ourselves as ithers see us,' 
Quoth Robert Burns. But on the Coast 
We have a system that we boast will 

do the trick — 
Just hold it steady — ■ 
Be photographed by Uncle Freddie". 



parking area behind Draper Hall, and 
the building of a walk between Draper 
Hall and the new Abbey. 



A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS 

TO ALL OLTR FRIENDS 

AT 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

JAMES A. LOWELL, Book$eller 



Fountain Pen and Pencil Sets - Desk Sets - Playing Card* and other Bridge Accessorie* 
ranied and Special College Stationery - Books for people oi all Ages and Interests 
Ice Skates and other Athletic Equipment 



A. J. Hastings 



N»W SDBALBR and 
8TATIONRR 



17 So. Pleasant St. 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our hifth-clamod work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed I 1 



FOR THAT Cil FT FOR BROTHER OR 1>A1> 

He will appreciate something to wear. 

Plenty of Ties, Sox, Belts, Suspenders, Gloves, etc. 

Come in and look around. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Cloth** for College Men for forty-fit* ytara 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
|Work called for and delivered Telephone 828 



RINCi COMMITTEE KKPORT 

Continued from Page 1 
immediately after the Christmas vaca- 
tion. If they should miss the first 
opportunity, they may place their 
order during the junior week. 

To give great variety, the rings will 
come in three weights and with three 
finishes on the stone. The range in 
price, too, is reasonable, going from 
$4.00 to $15.25. 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 

Winter Sports 

Togs lead 

the line 




We stock the finest Ski Clothing 
in this part of the country. 

Ski Suits Piirkfis SM«;ilcrs 

Ski Root* (official model) 

Outfits for Men and Women 



Statistics Rhinks 

The social societies are urged to 
return their statistical blanks as soon 
as possible to the Index office. Those 
who have not received blanks will 
have an opportunity to do so soon, it 
was announced. The yearbook, Ne 
Jame said, will be out earlier than last 
year, probably around the first of May. 



PREVIEWS 



Those of u.s who haven't as yet 
had a chance to see Warner Brothers 
excellent production of Mr. Shakes- 
peare's Midsummer Night's Dream 
still have a chance to do so this 
afternoon or evening at the Amherst 
Theater. A fine piece of acting, 
direction and photography, it is 
well worth the public's attention. 
Shakespeare is getting pretty popu- 
lar on the screen these days. 



»• \ I itoM/i oil: 
ADVKKTISKKS 




(Sifts for Max 

Choose for your men friends, gifts that meet with men's 
approval. Here are some examples of what the man with 
thoughtful friends will receive. 

PACKARD ELECTRIC RAZOR $12.98 

DIGBY ENGLISH IMPORTED PIPES 2.00 

BRIGGS PIPE TOBACCO 1 lb. 99c 

CIGARETTE CASES 1.25 

PIPE RACKS 1.25 

HUMIDORS 

MENNEN'S GIFT SETS 
GILLETTE RAZOR SET 
TOBACCO POUCHES 

WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

THE CTT RATE STORK 



1.50 
1.00 
1.45 
1.00 



College Candy Kitchen 



CANDY the old customary Christmas gift. 
Select out of our lines — ready to mail. 
PAGE & SHAW KEMP CYNTHIA SWEETS 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 






MM 



8 



T11K MASS 



ACIILSF/rrS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, PHCEMBEB 17, 1936 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



NETTLKTON SHOES 

TRY A PAIR OF NETTLETON ALGONQUINS 



THREE 
NEW 
TRUSTEES 



ICIIABOD DOL1TTLE 

Continued from Page 1 
Holyoke to coax their prospects along 
with. It works in most cases, es- 
pecially when the prospect is getting 
shy of campus material. 

"To make her think she's putting 
something over on the rest of the 
campus women is somewhat akin to 
coaxing, except that it is possible to 
be less subtle about it. All you have 
to do is to be talking with some other 
girl when your prospect approaches 
and leave this other girl for her when 
the prospect gets within glaring dis- 
tance. That's the best way. There 



are others, but they are so tied up 
with the individuality of certain of 
their users that they are unsuited to 
general practice. 

Mr. Doolittle stopped for a moment 

to rest, there being several women 

present in the Collegian office, not an 

unusual occurrence in these days of 

sob-sistering. When they had retired, 

he gave vent to his last bit of advice. 

That Biifc Brother Bunine** 

"Never try to be a big brother to 

your prospect," Mr. Doolittle said. 

"No matter how much you may love 

her, she will never get ecstatic about 

a big brother. It's a shame, too, be- 



i au.se certain men can never get away 
from the big brother attitude. They'll 
do anything for the girl, but the 
minute a fellow's good deeds reek of 
inevitability, the prospect looks else- 
where. You know, a girl can choose 
her boy friends, but they haven't a 
thing to say when it comes to having 
relatives. Or don't you get my point." 
The reporter got the point. And it 
being time to close the office for the 
night, Mr. Doolittle was asked to 
leave. He left and the reporter 
wondered just what the status of 
Ichabod Doolittle '38 would be come 
his present prospect's sorority formal. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE 

ART CALENDARS 

Just arrived — Ready for mailing. 

A fine souvenir 
An excellent Christmas Gift 

Every student will want one of these 
attractive calendars with six views 
of the campus. 

GET YOURS EARLY AT 

THE COLLEGE STORE 



MEET AT 



BARSELOni'S CAR 



BALLANTINE'S ALE 



HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 



Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 




Buddy, 

I can't pay a higher compli- 
ment than that. 

Girl or cigarette . . . when 
I tumble that means I'm 
for 'em. 
Chesterfield's my cigarette. 
And Til tell all hands they've 
got a hearty good taste that 
makes a sailor happy. And 
listen, they're milder. 
. . .for the good things a 
cigarette can give a sailor^ 




^%j^* 




VI. A. C. Library. 



(Mrata 



WATT 
SPEAKS 
THURSDAY 



oi. xi vn 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, Till KSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



No. i ; 



936 Remembered by 
Outstanding Events 



Ipecial Collegian Issues 

and Successful Winter 

Carnival Listed Among 

' Major Campus Events 

The year just past has been an 

■ctive one on the M.S.C. campus. 

Among other things, 1936 has seen 

Kie first winter carnival ever held at 

» U s college. Following is a resume of 

year's outstanding events. 

January 
State Frosh reported to have 
higher mental standing than 
average college freshmen. 
William C. Monahan named trus- 
tee of college 
First vie party held in Thatcher. 
Angna Enters in Social Union. 

February 
First Winter Carnival begins. 
Collegian publishes special anni- 
versary edition. 
Fletcher Henderson plays at the 

Carnival Ball. 
I raternities pledge 23. 
Farewell banquet given to Coach 
M.I Taube. 
im-rs Quartet at Social Union. 

March 
Roister Doisters present dual pro- 
duction of Othello. 
248 students on Dean's honor list. 
. .lection system announced 
by Senate. 

tdentfl help relieve homeless 
flood victims. 
April 
h Caraway arrives. 
Alpha Lambda Mu wins inter- 

norority sing. 
McEnelly plays for intereorority 

formal. 
Four departments present a "Mid- 
BUmmer Night's Fantasy." 

Continued on Paged 



Broadcast Today 
From WSPR at 5 



1 L. Warner, a graduate of 
College in 1934, has been 
<1 to the staff of the College News 
according to announcements 
Bn M president's office this week. 
B Warner will handle the major 
newspaper publicity, while 
Pray is to supervise radio 
of the college. Newspaper 
>licit> will continue to be under 

direction of Mr. Pray, 
he runt of the series of radio pro- 



gra 

in 

o'cl 

coo 

cb 

a^ri 

ing 

por 

Mi 

be 



i will be broadcast from WSPR 

Seld this afternoon at 6 

'k. Sponsored by the college in 

ration with the Western Massa- 

'i- Winter Sports Council, the 

will feature instruction in ski- 

•S I iwrence E. Briggs and re- 

"ow conditions in Western 

"chusetta. The broadcasts will 

Continued each Thursday afternoon 

■r il„ , -„,_, station. 



it* 



MON KEY HATS 
|ARE STILL MISSING 

* rn\ :ery of the missing Maroon 
ill remains unsolved despite 
be part of the members to 

l hf h,»i.s, 

1 been found or returned 
afternoon, according to 
' ■ kard, president of the 
tn " r ' organization. 



„37 winter To Present Bay State 

CARNIVAL | J __. 

Revue Saturday Night 



PROGRAM 



9:00-12 

1:00 

3:00 

3:30 

7:00 

9:30 



8:30 a.m. 



2:00 p.m. 

2:30 

3:00 

3:30 

4:30 

8:00 

10:15 



FRIDAY, FEBRl'ARY 12 

Arrival of trains, special busses, from Boston, Worcester, etc. 
Tobogganning, Figure Skating, Skijoring — near Pond. 
Figure and Comic exhibition skating — Pond. 
Swimming meet in Pool — M.S.C. vs. Coast Guard. 
Basketball game at Cage — Norwich vs. M.S.C. 
Carnival Ball Drill Hall. Judging of Queen and Court. 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 

Intercollegiate and invitation ski meet — Bull Hill, N. Amherst. 

For men — Downhill and Slalom — Jumping. 

For women — Downhill — Slalom. 

Hot refreshments. Transportation furnished. 
Hockey game at Pond M.S.C. vs. Amherst. 
Figure Skating — between periods of hockey game. 
End of cross country snowshoe race between periods of hockey game. 
Boxing and Wrestling Physical Education Cage. 
"Ski Boot" Informal Drill Hall. 
Magician Mulholland at Social Union Bowker Auditorium. 

Torchlight Parade to Prexy's Hill. Capture of Queen. 
March to Memorial Building. Coronation on throne. 
Queen presents awards, prizes, etc. 
Chapel Bell, Bombs, Flares, etc. End of '37 Carnival. 



HURLEY NEW 
CHAIRMAN OF 
THE TRUSTEES 



As one of his last acts of office, 
ex-Governor James M. Curley ap- 
pointed two new trustees to succeed 
those whose terms expire this week. 

Mrs. Elizabeth McNamara of Cam- 
bridge, a member of the Democratic 
national committee, will replace Mrs. 
Lottie A. I^each of Walpole, and James 
T. Cassidy of Dorchester, a graduate 
of Boston University School of Law, 
1934-35 special assistant district at- 
torney of Suffolk County, and assist- 
ant district attorney of Suffolk County 
since November 1935, will succeed 
James P. Hacon of Boston. 

Governor Charles F. Hurley, former 
Continued on Page 5 



With the release? of tne complete 
Winter Carnival program today, the 
plans for the affair are rapidly being 
completed. The carnival rally, held 
last night in Bowker Auditorium, was 
well attended, and two motion pic- 
tures were shown, one of last year's 
carnival here, and a short entitled 
"Dartmouth Days." Crawford W. 
Adams '38, was the speaker. 
Invitation* Sen! 

The invitations sent out to various 
New England colleges to send ski • 
teams here are being returned now, ! 
and so far Wesleyan and Middlebury \ 
have accepted. 

The selection of the orchestra for 
the Carnival Prom has not yet been 
announced, but the committee said 
yesterday that the choice would f>e 
disclosed next week. 

Transportation 

Special arrangements for the trans- 
portation of jieople to the carnival 
from Boston, Worcester, and points 
en route has been arranged 



SMITH GIVES 
CHIMES FOR 
OLD CHAPEL 



Coincident with reports from the 
old chapel that the renovation is pro- 
gressing rapidly came the announce- 
ment that a set of chimes has been 
presented to the college by Bernard 
H. Smith '99. The chimes, consisting 
of ten bells, were given in memory of 
Dr. Warren Elmer Hinds '99, who 
died on January 11, 193(5. 

This week, cement for the reenforce- 
ment of the foundation was being 
poured while studding for the par- 
titions neared completion. Repairs on 
the roof are also being made. 

The ten Im'IIs, ranging in weight 

from 225 to 1500 pounds, are being 

Continued on Page 5 



Collegian Reporter Analyzes Going Home on 

Vacations; Freshmen Enjoy Them the Least 



Of especial interest to college stud- 
ents and particularly to freshmen is 
this business of going home on vaca- 
tions. The special analyzer for the 
Collegian has gone to the trouble of 
accumulating and conclusion-drawing 
for the purpose of presenting students 
who do not spend their vacations in 
the right manner with a vacation 
modus operandi. 

Kc- orientation 

The freshmen have the hardest 
time re-orienting themselves to their 
home surroundings after a period 
spent at Massachusetts State. In fact 
it has been noted that freshmen, as 
they are spending their Thanksgiving 
or Christmas vacations, sometimes 
are troubled with much mental tur- 
moil. They long to leave the old 
homestead and head back on the road 
to Amherst. In fact this turmoil, by 
the time the freshman gets to be a 



junior or senior, often takes on an 
active state and the person afflicted is 
liable to leave home in the middle of 
a vacation period and return, pre- 
sumably to paint the fraternity house. 

It has been found t hat freshmen have 
many burdens thrust upon them when 
they are at home. For one thing they 
cannot swear as much as they do at 
college. There are a lot of other 
things too, but perhaps the most im- 
portant is that their friends and rela- 
tives place them in very embarrassing 
situations. 

21 Fhiiioiim Wordu 

Freshmen on campus are nothing 
more than nonentities. At home, of 
course, they become the cynosure of 
all eyes. They are placed in a witness 
box and are forced to perform in 
their best collegiate manner for the 
folks. Perhaps the line most quoted 
from the lips of M.S.C. freshmen 



past and present to friends and rela- 
tives is the famous, "It isn't an agri- 
cultural college any more. In fact 
only four percent of the students at 
Massachusetts STATK take agricul- 
tural courses." 

Then there is the problem of keeping 
peace with the boy or girl that's been 
left behind. This is perhaps the 
hardest vacation duty of all and it has 
been found that the best thing to do 
with the home town love is to leave 
it alone, for off campus love never is 
binding, what with all these theoreti- 
cal temptations at college. 
I Ik- Solution 

Through a survey recently conduc- 
ted with people who matter it has 
been concluded that the best thing to 
do when at home on vacations is to 
st ud \ This disturbs the folks no end, 
but then, think what it would do to 
the professors -if they found out. 



Program Does not Include 
a Gilbert and Sullivan 
Operetta as in Former 
Years; Both to Play 

The annual Bay State Revue will 
be presented Saturday evening, Jan. 
9 at 8 o'clock in Bowker Auditorium. 



Operetta in April 

Contrary to the practice last year 
of including a Gilbert and Sullivan 
operetta as part of the Bay State 
Revue, this year's operetta, Utopia 
Limited, will be presented as a separate 
venture by the combined musical 
clubs on April 23 and 24. 

This revue has been organized and 
will be presented by the students of 
the college under the auspices of the 
Roister Doister Society. 

The Bay State Revue is presented 
each year, and has become an annual 
occurence of college; social activities. 

Any student or groups of students 
who have talent suitable for presen- 
tation are eligible to take part in the 
performance. 

However, the plans Bfe not fully 
completed, and there will be additions 
to the evening's entertainment . 

The partial program for the Bay 
State Revue will include: 

Selections by college orchestra 
//7//.S of Home Cloths of Heoren 

Sung by James Kerr ':«> 
Dramatic Skit Rota 

Frank Krox '38 Charles Collins '38 
Lucille Monroe '37 
Guitar Selections 

James Lee 'AH 
Impersonations of Radio Characters 

LerOV Houghton Jr. '.17 
Eccentric Dancing 

Robert Ciddings '38 

Continued on Page 4 



Clancy, Whaley Are 
Chosen by Sigma Xi 

Carl Francis Clancy '31 and William 
Cordon Whaley '36 have been awarded 
certificates of merit, by Sigma Xi, 
honorary society nationally organized 
for the promotion of research. The 
certificate's were given for excellence 
in original research. Clancy was a 
major in bacteriology and physiology, 
and received his masters degree in 
1936. Whaley is now at Columbia 
University. While at State he worked 
in genetics with Professor A. I*. 
French. 

Charter Deferred 

At the executive meeting of Sigma 

Xi, held at Atlantic City, the vote on 

the petition of the local Sigma Xi 

Club for a charter was deferred until 

Continued on Pagr 5 



WATT TO SPEAK AT 
NEXT CONVOCATION 

Robert J. Watt, secretary -treasurer 
and legislative agent for the Massa- 
chusetts Federation of Labor and an 
active labor leader, will speak at 
convocation on January 14. 

Watt gave a memorable talk here 
last year. This year he will discuss 
"Program of Organized I.abor in the 
Nation and State." 



Copyright 19J6. Liggett a Mvma Tobacco Co 



THE 




I MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1J»:*7 



&A 



^T^^j^j ^^lfU Colle,e. Publ.,he d every Thursday by the tudenU. 

LOUIS A. BREAULT '37. Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK UNDSTROM '38. ^U^EdiU^WALT ER GURALNICK "37, A^ociateE dUor 




CAMPUS 

CALENDAR 



Campus 
PHILIP B. SH1KF '37, Editor 
RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 
JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 
MAURICE TONKIN '38 
THOMAS J. EN RIGHT '39 
MARY T. MEEHAN "39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD '39 
MABELLE BOOTH '39 
BETTINA HALL '39 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWICZ '40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '40 
SUSAN E. STUTSMAN '40, Secretary 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 



JULIAN H. KATZEFF '38. Editor 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 
ALFRED M. SWIREN *38 
JOHN E. FILIOS '40 
ARTHUR A. NOYES "40 

Make-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37. Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

Stockbridge Correspondents 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 
WESLEY NUTTER S'38 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37, Business Manager 
Business Assistants 
CLIFFORD E SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH '37. Circulation Mgr. 

CLIFFORD E. &YMAIN WILUAM B FER GUSON '38. Subscription Mgr. 

„ r, r D1H »M "VI WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

WILLIAM B- GRAHAM 38 SILVERMAN '38 

MITC 2?t rARP^i CHARLES RODDA 39 
ALLEN'S M HENRVW^ 



Some pilpll think that nothing 
ever happen* on thin campus. 
They're right. But just the MOM 
we have a column to plug which, 
by the very nature of the beast, 
has been starving for the past 
couple weekN while student* have 
been entering into the Christina* 
spirit and the Christmas spirit 
has to no small extent been enter- 
ing into the student. Happy 
New Year. 

We'll Stooge for a 95— No Less ! 

Anyway, our favorite jokester 
prof seems to have begun the New 
Year with a resolution not to laugh 
at his own jokes. That's a peachy 
resolution. The only trouble is 
that, because he neglected to 
accompany his resolution with 
another one to tell only funny 
stories, his first sally fell so flat 
that nobody cares if he doesn't 
salvage it for next year. "It is a 
long time," he droned, "since I 
was a girl." Soulless silence. 
Well, what can you expect? 



SUBSCRIPTIONS t2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



Make all orders payable to Th* Massachusetts 
ColUgian. In case of change of address, subsenber 
will please notify the business manager as soon as 
possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
trlbution. are sincerely encouraged. Any eommun.- 
cation, or notices must be received at the Cotton 
office be fore 9 o'clock. Monday evemng. Phone 13Z-W 

Entered as second^lass matter at the Amherst Post 
Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate oL postage 
provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917, 
authorized Augus t 20. 1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North Street. 
Northampton. Mass. Telephone 554. 



1016 Member 1937 

Associated GoUe6iate Press 

Distributors of 

Golle6iateDi6est 

JUJMMMf ron national advsrtisino »y 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Represtutativ* 
420 Madison Ave. NEW YORK. N.Y. 

CH.C.r.O - BOSTON - SAN FRANCISCO 

LOI ANSUf • - PORTLAND • MATTH 



Anyway, it was Woolworth it 

A co-ed, returning from a ride with 
the boy friend, discovered that in the 
scramble she had lost her ear-rings. 
Searching through the car, he found but 
one piece of jewelry that even remotely 
resembled an ear-ring. With a smile he 
dangled it before her limpid eyes. 

"Oh" she sobbed, "that's not mine." 



Thursday, Jan. 7 

7:30 p.m. Band, Memorial Building 
8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, at 
Stockbridge 

Friday, Jan. 8 

7:30 p.m. Social Dancing Class, at 

Drill Hall. 
8:00 p.m. Sorority pledge formals: 
Phi Zeta, Lord Jeff 
Sigma Beta, Hills Memorial 
Sigma Iota, informal dance. 
Saturday, Jan. 9 

Basketball, Williams, there. 
Hockey, Army, there 
3:00 p.m. Swimming, Wesleyan 
8:00 p.m. Bay State Revue, Bow- 
ker Auditorium. 
Sunday, Jan. 10 

5:00 p.m. Vespers, Wilmer J. Kitch- 
en, executive secretary of New 
England Christian movement, 
Memorial Building. 
Monday, Jan. 11 

3:30 p.m. Hockey, M.I.T., here 
Tuesday, Jan. 12 

7:00 p.m. Outing Club meeting, 

French Hall. 
8:00 p.m. Men's Glee Club. 
Smith College Concert. 
Wednesday, Jan. 13 

8:00 p.m. Basketball, Conn. State 
at M.S.C. 
Thursday, Jan. 14 

11:00 a.m. Convocation, Robert J. 

Watt, sec.-treas. of Mass. State 

Federation of Labor. 

7:30 p.m. Band, Memorial Building 

8:00 p.m. Hockey, Northeastern at 

Boston. 
8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, at 
Stockbridge. 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN dsaj 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opimom 
voiced in this column. Communications u**; 
not be signed, but the identity of the writet 
must be known to the editor-in-chief. 



CDITCCIAL 



BEST WISHES FOR 

Today a new president of the Board of Trustees of our 
coll Je takes office assuming that title as he - '"^urated 
soverno of the Commonwealth. To Charles F Hurley we offer 
fmcer!Lt best wishes for a successful term of office m both 

CaP " As president of the Board of Trustees we hope that the new 
governor will take an earnest interest in his college. We hope 
that he will endeavor to make the acquaintance of adm.mstra- 
tion faculty and students alike that he may better understand 
the n^ds of the college and the characteristics of .ts faculty and 

students. _, , 

To the departing head of the Board of Trustees we also 
offer felicitations. As one of the last acta of hu, mcumbency as 
Governor James Michael Curley appointed two trustee. We 
Tope that they, with the new governor, wil become our fnends. 
It has often been said, and truthfully too, that the trustees 
are never well enough known on campus. It is tnie the students 
Z them once a year when they appear in a body at trustee 
TnvocaLn and sometimes one of them speaks at the college 
but we never see them often enough. Maybe the pressure of 
nther work is too great for them to extend their contacts with the 
SHegeteyond the' administration, but we feel that if the trustees 
aHowed their students to know them better, the students would 
haveT deeper understanding of the workings of the inst.tution. 



Sometimes Kimft. NEVER Wronji 

A local math instructor announced 
one day that henceforth the students 
should arrive on time or be locked out. 
Came the next day. Four frosh were 
locked out as threatened. Then 
stealthily through a crack in the door 
panel came a note. The instructor 
read the note, wrote an answer, and 
pushed the answer under the door. 

The Note: "We, the undersigned, 
petition vou to let us in." 

Signed: x+y+z+a 
The Answer: "Sorry, boys, the 

bell was never wrong." 

— Understudy 



Announcements 



<iold Ring Found 

A gold ring was found on the high- 
way between the Waiting Station and 
the Experiment Stations. Apply to 
W. H. Armstrong, Superintendent of 
Grounds. 



ATMOSPHERE 

It was silent outside, 

Like snow falling on velvet. 

The quiet hush of the night 

Stole between the 

Transparent moonbeams, 

Filling my soul 

With strange disturbing dreams. 

And there sat that damn girl 

Eating hamburger and onions. 

— Voo Doo. 



Car Registration 

All cars in use on the campus are to 
be registered immediately with the 
Superintendent of Grounds. Students 
and those not on the college staff will 
present their registration numbers at 
the office of the Superintendent of 
Grounds. Staff members are requested 
to be reported by the various depart- 
mental heads. 



R1M.S AM) BELLS 

This college year has seen the beginning of two new tra- 
ditions at Massachusetts State. Both of them will do much to 
bind students and alumni more closely to the college. 

One tradition is the creation of a standard college ring to be 
worn only bv students and alumni of the college. We need say 
nothing of the significance of rings, but we may point out several 
things in connection with the ring as a new college tradition. 

For any person connected with the college as a student, the 
ring will serve as a means of identification with his alma mater. 
For any person whose collegiate association did not include 
fraternity ties, the ring will be, perhaps, of double value. 

The rings are not expensive. We are glad that they have 
been made a part of our college life. 

The other tradition will become a reality when a set of new 
chimes rings out from the chapel tower. This gift, donated by a 
generous alumnus, will do a great deal in bringing about a fuller 

campus life. 

It may seem paradoxical that we should call new things 
traditions.' But we feel that once the rings are worn and once 
the chimes sound forth' that college traditions will be inaugurated. 



From an unimpeachably au- 
thoritative source comes the 
story of an instructor who pre- 
sented his son with a swell me- 
chanical toy for a Christmas 
present. It was a police car full 
of G-men that runs around in a 
circle and spite sparks from 
bristling cannons. So far the poor 
kid hasn't even had a fighting 
chance to wind the toy. He'll 
just have to wait until Pop skids 
on the car and begins spitting 
bullets. 



Rand Rehearsal 

The weekly rehearsal of the Band 
will be held Thursday night at 7:30 
in the Memorial Building. All those 
who expect to participate in the 
concert at the Bay State Review, 
Saturday evening, must be present 
and on time. 

Wildlife Program 

Students and faculty members in- 
terested in the wildlife program of the 
College are cordially invited to attend 
a meeting in French Hall on January 
7 at 7:30 p.m., Room 209. Three films 
will be shown on Forest Fires and 
Game, Wildlife Resources, and Game 
Management. 



c 



re 



Bacteriology Club 

The next meeting of the Bacteri- 
ology Club will be held Tuesday eve- 
ning. Jan. 12 at 7:30 in the Farley 
Club House. 



MID-SEMESTERS 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Soon professors will have reap^l 
their harvest of happiness by theijl 
belaying mid-semester tests. And! 
soon we shall award them the higt| 
distinction of being the most incor.f 
rigible and unmitigated group 
people on earth. 

Faults Developing 

Unfortunately, one of the worst! 

faults in our present day educational 

system is making itself felt on thjl 

campus, and the fault is that of • I 

students working in courses to get! 

good marks rather than to lean! 

something. It must certainly fcj 

apparent that there is a differenol 

between the two methods of study. I 

Perhaps it is too optimistic to hoptl 

for anything as radical as a change icl 

the marking system to offset this jJ 

the nea* future, but something couldl 

be done to better the situation. | 

One method of study is and hJ 

been to faithfully copy the words ol 

the professor whenever he expresaal 

an opinion, and then on the final! 

examination, the wise student, who J 

out for the good mark, fires back aJ 

the prof exactly what he has said iil 

the classroom. Now here is where tbtl 

students who really want to leanl 

something are handicapped by I 

hopelessly musty manner of presetl 

tation. The result is that they eitheJ 

forget their desire for a mark and reallil 

try to learn something on their ow 

or else they cater to the whims of th 

professor at the cost of real cultunj 

knowledge. 

This condition is lamentable, bffl 
true. While it applies to only a fei 
courses here at M.S.C, the fact n 
mains that if we are to improve, i| 
might be worthwhile to do a litl' 
cobweb dusting in certain department!! 
One Opinion 
It would be gratifying to all ofi 
to learn that the majority of coU« 
professors are of the same opinion I 
the Syracuse University teacher wlx 
he said: "Since the ideal of educatia 
is one which demands the intimaij 
knowledge by the instructor of 
students, a grade should represent nJ 
only what is actually obtained <f 
examinations but also that which 
revealed by the students ability duri 
more-or-less off the record classroo^ 
recitations and conferences. For 
stance, if a student shows excelk 
progress throughout the semester, 
lacks the complete knowledge of 
course at the end, and if his ultimaj 
grasp of the subject is obvious, 
might waive examination grades 
some extent." 

There is a sometimes tense, sou 
time indifferent feeling that graA 
are nothing more than black-on-wh 
marks and are not sufficient to 
what a student knows about a cou 
It is gratifying to know that not I 
professors are wholly heartless matb 
maticians and statisticians. 

_.sVm<H 



Shorthorn Board 

Arnie Aho, editor-in-chief of the 
Shorthorn, announces the members of 
his board chosen so far. They are: 
assistant editor. R. Rosenfield; busi- 
ness manager, Fred Fisher; art editor, 
Irene Boguslowski; statistic editor, 
W. McCormick; photographic editor. 
F Fife Other positions have not 
been filled as yet but should In- 
completed within the week. 

Prof. Hollin H. Barrett will again 
act as faculty advisor. Prof. Barrett 
has carried this responsibility for th,- 
past six years and is well equipped I for 
this position. With his aid the editor 
and Inisiness manager have already 
selected the printers and engravers 
for the publication 



Outing Club 

The Outing Club will hold a meet- 
ing, Tuesday, Jan. 12 at 7 p.m. in 
French Hall. Prof. Arthur H. Baxter 
will speak on "Hiking on the Matter- 
horn." The talk will be illustrated. 

Men's CUM Club 

There will be a rehearsal of the 
Men's Glee Club on Saturday, -Jan. 9 
at 1 p.m. Place: the Memorial Build- 
ing. All those who wish to make the 
Htftford trip must be present. 

t'lieiuislry Club 

The ChMfttotry Club is sponsoring a 
fectOIV to be given at the Goessmann 
Auditorium, Thursday, Jan. 7 at 7:30 
p.m. Edward Dovle of the American 
Writing l'n|"' r Company of Holyoke 
will talk oi. "PajxT Chemistry." 



Combined Musical Clubs 

The board of managers of 
Combined Musical Clubs annou 
another concert and dance Ian. 
Admission will be 35c a couple 
25c stag. Proceeds will again go I 
defray expenses of the operett i 



''Continued on Page 6 ] !•'/.. -ullv Mid ..Indents are invited. 




S P ORTS 




JOHNSON NETS TWO AS 
PUCKMEN DEFEAT UNION 



Paced by Bill Johnson, second line 
wing. tne State hockey team opened 
the season, yesterday, with a 3-2 win 
ver Union on the college pond. 
Johnson scored in the first and second 
periods, once on an assist from Niden, 
while Dick Towle also counted in the 
first period to supply the margin of 
victory. 

Hindered by lack of practice the 
Statesmen had trouble with offensive 

ns-work and defensive play, but 



Index Statistics 

The statistics board of the l" 
requests that all upperclassmen, 
have not as yet filled out a stati^ 
form for the 1937 Index, do s<> • 
as possible. Forms may be oM 
at the Library desk, and should 
returned there as soon as pos^'hlf 

Math Club , 

Comments on Relativity »iuj 
the subject of the talk to be pr«*J 
at the Math Club meeting W ti m 
nesday at the Math Building » 
he presented by George Bl W 
All students are invited to * tt6l> * | 
Continued "' ' I 



paas- 

rapao 



le performances in the goal by 




HOCKEY 




CAPT. AL INGALLS 



Captain Al Ingalls and Clif Morey 
staved off a faultering Union attack. 
The first period opened with State 
charging the New Yorker's net and 
was Maroon all the way. Midway in 
the second period Paul scored Union's 
first marker on a rebound, but John- 
son came through with an unassisted 
goal a little later in the same period 
to boost the State lead to 3-1. 

I*ed by right wing Orton, the Dutch- 
men made a great deal of trouble for 
State near the end of the game, 
threatening the goal many times. With 
Niden in the penalty box, Orton got to 
Ingalls for the second Union point. 
Very few penalties marked the game 
with Niden being the only man to 
visit the box more than once. He 
was chased in both the second and 
third periods. 

Lavrakas and Mildram of the first 

| line and Rossiter at defense were 

others to stand out in the State line-up. 

I Rossiter played an aggressive bruising 

| game. The line-up: 



TANKMEN OPEN 
WITH WESLEYAN 



In its first meet of the current 
season, the varsity swimming team 
will meet Wesleyan in the M.S.C. pool 
Saturday afternoon at 3 p.m. The 
Statesmen will be seeking their first 
victory over the Wesmen in four 
years. In each of the past two years 
the Wesmen have handed the States- 
men one of their two defeats. 
Strength I'nknown 

The strength of the State tankmen 
is as yet a matter of speculation. Al- 
though there are many veterans left 
from last year, co-captain Cutter has 
be n ill for the past two weeks and 
will not be in top form. Last year 
Cutter broke the 220-yd. freestyle 
record every time he swam in that 
event. He also holds the pool 100-yd. 
freestyle record. 

Other veteran record holders are 
co-captain Hodder in the 200-yd. 
breast stroke and Dean Rounds in 
the 150-yd. backstroke. The record- 
holding 400-yd. freestyle relay team 
of Fisher, Rounds, Cutter, and Lo- 
throp, and the 300-yd. medley relay 
team of Rounds, Hodder, and Ix>throp 
are both intact save for the loss of 
Cummings Lothrop, captain of last 
year's team. 

Depends on Sophomores 

The success of this year's team will 
undoubtedly depend on the showing 
of the untried sophomores who will be 
holding down varsity positions. A- 
mong the sophomores who will prob- 
ably start against Wesleyan are Calo 
in the freestyle dashes, Howes in the 
relay, Spellman in freestyle distance 
events, and Page in the dives. 



MAROON FIVE TOPPLE 
MIDDLEBURY AND TECH 



Army and M.I.T. 
Puckmen Next 



Mas*. State 


(3) 




Union (2) 


Lavrakas, 




rw 


Orton 


Mildram 




c 


Paul 


Linden 




Iw 


Bond 


Towle 




rd 


Gormeyer 


Niden 




Id 


Hawley 


Ingalls 




g 


Borden 



iHouse Teams 
Open Season 



A new system of organization and 
■administration in intramural athletics, 
Iwa.s i.'cently inaugurated by Sid 
[Kaufman, director of intramural ath- 
llttiis, fof the promotion and super- 
vision ..(' the intramural program. 

Mr. Kaufman will have the help of 
r( 'l'ft ■ dtative student managers from 
fcach competitive team whose indi- 
vidual duties are as follows: to 
Notify Mi team members of the date, 
Waco, and time of each contest; to 
ran«. „ d a t e for postponed games; 
•° *p that his team is on hand at the 
icbtdu] 1 time; to familiarize his 
r f?ani/.tj on ^th the department's 
I'pbilny rules; to submit a list of 
layer- to the scorer before every 
am ' nd to return the score card 
M rtatiHa of the game played to the 
"»te of the intramural director at the 
F°»nple-ion of each contest. 



With the Union win tucked safely 
away on the right side of the ledger, 
Coach Lorrin Ball's hockey squad 
faces two of its toughest opponents 
this Saturday and Monday in the 
person of West Point and M.I.T. 

Fifteen members of the squad will 
leave tomorrow for West Point where 
the following afternoon State will 
meet Army on its home rink. Present- 
ing its usual strong opposition, the 
cadet team will be slightly favored 
because its roster includes faster 
skaters with more experience. Re- 
turning home, the pucksters will meet 
the tested Tech squad on the college 
pond in a game scheduled to get under 
way at 3:30. Equal in strength, the 
outcome of Monday's encounter will 
be in doubt all the way. 

The possibility of an upset in the 
Army game is great and with both the 
first and second lines functioning 
properly a great deal may be looked 
for. The strongest part of the State 
offense is its defense which boasts two 
capable goalies, both worthy of first 
team ranking. Captain Al Ingalls, 
because of his seniority deserves the 
call over Sophomore Clif Morey, but 
both will make the Army and Tech 
offensive tasks doubly hard. 



With three home games, and an- 
other in town with the Lord Jeffs at 
the south end of town, the hockey team 
is doomed to again play before the 
smallest number of State rooters any 
major sport will draw this year. If 
there was any possibility of this state- 
ment not being so, we would ask for 
better support of the team. But with 
conditions as they are the poor turn- 
out must be attributed to poor weather 
conditions and inferior facilities. 

For a sport limited to the month of 
January the pucksters have one of the 
most representative schedules of all 
State teams with a roster including 
games with West Point, Hamilton, 
Amherst, New Hampshire, and M.I.T. 
The fact that Coach Ball's charges 
are, through the years, consistently in 
the win column is another point that 
makes the lack of drawing power so 
apparent. The basketball team draws 
well in the bleakest of seasons, while 
winning hockey has trouble rounding 
up enough sport fans to give the 
appearance of intercollegiate compe- 
tition. 

(jiving the weather its due, a few 
games are postponed every year be- 
cause of too much sun shining on too 
little ice, but hot spells are not re- 
sponsible for the ankle-high boards on 
the pond that look more like a border- 
line than one of the most important 
offensive and defensive aids in the 
stick game. With boards of reason- 
able height home games would be 
faster and more colorful, resulting in 
larger crowds and more interest in the 
team among the students. This sup- 
port could not help but reflect in the 
win and loss record. 

The ideal situation would be an 
indoor rink similar to those at Hamil- 
ton and Bowdoin, with removable 
walls that allow the use of natural ice. 
With a rink of this type the games 
could be played at night to avoid 
conflicting with the scheduled classes, 
and with a reasonable amount of 
speed and color the pucksters would 
draw equally as well as the basketball 
team. 

Pipe dreams of this type, certainly 
won't hurt the club and might en- 
courage a half dozen more out for the 
next home encounter. Led by Capt. 
Al Ingalls, coached by Lorin Ball, the 
team, we know, will be a whole lot 
better than the support it receives 
from the undergraduates. 



H00PMEN TO 
MEET WILLIAMS 



After the long holiday recess the 
M.S.C. basketball team resumes play 
next Saturday night when it takes to 
the road to meet Williams at Williams- 
town. On next Wednesday night the 
team will oppose Connecticut State 
on its home court. 

Neither Impressive 

Coach Frigard is in high hopes of 
extending the teams' opening two- 
game winning streak. On paper the 
record of neither team is impressive. 
Like State, Williams has defeated 
Middlebury, but then dropped de- 
cisions to Columbia and Rensselaer 
Poly tech. Conn. State has yet to 
show its winning form, having lost to 
Northeastern, 42-37, and to ('lark by 
the measure of one point. 

According to present indications 
the State starting combination will be 
the same that has defeated Middle- 
bury and M.I.T. Fred Riel will start 
at center flanked by the high scoring 
captain Lefty Barr and Kd Celusniak 
at the wings. Sievers, Putnam, and 
Zelaszo will probably see service at 
the guard positions. 

Kent < oini<< i i< in in r.t;t<> 

State scored its only two victories 
of last season against Williams and 
Connecticut State. After defeating 
Williams 28-20 in the initial game, 
State lost in a return engagement 47- 
36. Last year's 58-32 win over the 
Nutmeggers was one in a long series 
of State victories over the Blue and 
White. 



HOW THE SCORERS STAND 



Barr 

Czelusniak 

Bush 

Riel 

Putnam 



23 

18 

15 

9 

5 



Hitting on all fours the M.S.C. 
hoopmen rang up two early season 
victories in as many days when they 
toppled Middlebury and M.I.T. in 
that order. The game with Middle- 
bury was won at home when the 
Statesmen scored a 36-31 win against 
the Panthers. The victory over M.I.T. 
came the next night when the team, 
still in its winning stride, came away 
with a 37-36 edge out. 

Both games found the State team 
lagging behind through most of the 
first half, but soon coming forward to 
take the lead which finally meant 
victory. The Statesmen played well 
both nights, with Captain Barr setting 
the scoring pace, followed by < Veins 
niak and Bush, both of whom showed 
up well. 

The contest with Middlebury saw 
Barr maintaining his high scoring 
performance of last season when he 
netted 16 points. Getting off to a 
slow start in this game, Coach Fri- 
gard's team was trailing until well 
along in the half, when with only four 
minutes of the period left, the score 
was tied. State took the lead when 
Riel scored on a rebound. In the 
second half the Panthers closed up a 
large lead which the Statesmen had 
taken, making the final score 36-31. 

The game with Tech at Boston the 
following night found the basketeers 
reversing the last year's outcome, 
setting the Technicians back on their 
heels, 37 to 36. The game was a 
see-saw affair in which neither team 
had a large lead at any time, and in 
which the Engineers put on a fine 
exhibition of defensive play. At the 
end of the half Tech had a two-point 
advantage which was soon lost as 
State forged ahead in the second 
period, maintaining the lead until 
with two minutes left to play, Kangas 
tied things up making the score 34-34. 
Bush immediately broke the deadlock 
but again Tech rounded the score out 
this time 36-36. With the game moving 
fast towards a winless outcome, Barr 
sank the decisive foul shot with twenty 
seconds to go. 



The responsibility for ascertaining 
the eligibility of any competitor, 
scheduling games, selection of officials, 
etc., rests with the intramural director. 
He will assign a list of officials for 
each contest, such officials to be paid 
for their services. He will aLso rule 
upon all protests which must be re- 
ceived by him in writing within 48 
hours after the contest was played or 
scheduled to be played. 



OFFICIATING COURSE 

All men interested in enrolling for a 
basketball officiating course leading 
to certification as a national official 
are asked to sign up with Sid Kaufman 
sometime during the next few days. 



WOMEN'S SPORTS 

All girls interested in participating 
4n badminton are urged to sign a list 
posted on the bulletin board in the 
girl's Gymnasium. A like sign is 
posted in the Abbey for those inter- 
ested in bowling. Competition in 
these sports is between both classes 
and individuals. 



SPORrS CALENDAR 

Basketball 

Saturday, Williams at Williamstown 

Wednesday, Conn. State, here 
Hockey 

Saturday, Army at West Point 

Monday, M.I.T., here 
Swimming 

Saturday, Wesleyan, here. 



League play got under way Tuesday 
night with Sigma Phi Epsilon and 
Phi Sigma Kappa winning both ends 
of their basketball-volleyball compe- 
tition. With Bill Barrett whipping the 
net all evening, S.P.E. topped Alpha 
Gamma Rho 31-6 in basketball and 
received a default in volleyball. Phi 
Sig gained a 22-11 win over Phi 
Lambda Tau in the hoop game and 
eked out a 2-1 win in the other contest. 




The first cote graduatf was 
CATHARINE BREWER. 

SHE GRADUATED rTIW Wl S\ FYAK) 
O0U.EGfc: ( AAAC0W,GA INI&40/ 



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A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londargan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 564 



Northampton, M 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



Phi Zeta, Sigma Beta Chi, Sigma 

Iot a Hold Pledge Dance Fri day 

P. W.A. Sign Has Ups and Downs in 
Battle Against State College Students 



Co*et> Hews 



The series of dances following the 
rushing season will continue tomorrow 
night when Phi Zeta and Sigma Beta 
Chi hold their annual pledge formals. 
Sigma Iota will hold an informal 
pledge dance. Members of Alpha 
Lambda Mu plan a formal for Jan. 16. 

Phi Zeta 

The annual Phi Zeta pledge formal 
will be held Friday night from eight 
to 11:30 at the Lord Jeffrey Inn. Bill 
Tatro's orchestra, which plays in the 
Hotel Nonotuck, Holyoke, will pro- 
vide the music. 

Those in the receiving line will be 
President Kay Wingate, Richard King, 
Mrs. Henschal, Miss Mildred Briggs, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hawley, and Dr. and 
Mrs. Ritchie. The patronnesses have 
been invited to drop in during the 
evening. There will be a few novel 
dances, including a favor dance, and 
a grand march. Several of the present 
members will serve as ushers. 

Thotte Attending 

Some of those attending are: Mary 
O'Connell, Bob Packard, Betty Bar- 
ton, Kenneth Newman; Carolyn 
Rogers, Edgar Beaumont, Doris 
Jenkins, Cyrus E. French, Muriel 
Cain, James Cutter, Marjorie Cain, 
Russell Purrington. 

Constance Fortin. William Howe; 
Eleanor Fahey, John Landers; Ro- 
berta Walkey, Ralph Ingram; Elthea 
Thompson, Edward Thacker; Phyllis 
Snow, Harry Snyder; Frances Morley, 
Carl Gerlack. 

Barbara Strode, Vincent Gilbert; 
Patsy McMahon, Gene Fowler; Mary 
Breinig, Frederick Seivers; Ruth 
Wood, Thomas Mahan; Anne Gilbert, 
Richard Irving, Marian Jones, Morris 
Ried; Lucy Kingston, Robert Bartlett. 
H. Marie Dow, Ed Harvey; Alma 
Boyden, David Tappan; Dolores 
Lesquier, Squire Munson; Betsy War- 
den, Charles Elliott; Nancy Russell, 
John McKelligott; Francis Driscoll, 
Walter McClinn; Betsy Perry, Rich- 
ard Hutchinson. 

Virginia Smith, George Gaudreau; 
Kay MacDonald, Guy Gray, Pauline 
Hillberg, Alvin Ryan; Irma Alvord, 
Donald Taber; Marjorie Irwin, Pres- 
cott Coan; Libby Howe, Robert 
Dewey; Priscilla Archibald, Charles 
Elliott; Kay Doran, Harding Jenkins. 
Catherine Leete, James Schoon- 
maker; Betty Abrams, Edward Hig- 
gins; Lorraine Creesy, William Cox; 
Evelyn Gould, Robert Muller; Bar- 
bara Little, John Hubbard; Eleanor 
Jewell, David Hornbecker. 

Pat Robbins, Ellis Sullivan; Mili- 
cent Carpenter, Robert Sheldon, Irma 
Malm, Franklin Davis, Beatrice 
Wood, Robert Hall; Freida Hall, 
Craig Paul; Dorothy Morley, John 
Osmun. 



In these days of turmoil and strife, 
everything is having its ups and 
downs. For further information see 
the stock market, college students' 
stockings, and the skaters on the 
college pond. 

But now a new "up-and-downer" 
has made its appearance on the State 
College campus. That shiny, white 
brand-new P.W.A. sign at the south- 
east entrance to the campus has 
entered the field. 

It Couldn't Take It 

The very first day it made its fla- 
grant appearance in the world of ski 
pants, hangovers, and college students, 
it succumbed to the wiles of several 
aesthetically-minded students and fell. 

But the P.W.A. workers, not a bit 
deterred, went into a huddle; the 
foreman called the signals; and the 
workers came out in a rush, and the 
sign passed over the line standing up 

again. 

This bit of strategy called for more 
action from the aforementioned stud- 
ents, and they in turn charged out in 
a flying wedge and the sign went down 
on the goal line. Evidently the stud- 
ents couldn't understand the sign 



Phi Zeta 

Phi Zeta announce* two new pledges: 
Shirley Bliss '38 and Louisa Towne '38. 

Mrs. Henschal is holding a tea this 
Thursday afternoon. Anne Gilbert is 
in charge. 



language, but they were managing to 
hold their own. 

The half ended as the college was 
closed for the holidays, and the stud- 
ents repaired to their respective homes 
for a pep talk by the captain of the 
wrecking squad. 

P.W.A. in Surprise Play 
In the interim, the P.W.A. pulled 
a surprise play. While no one was 
watching they dashed out into the 
field and went to work on the fallen 
sign. Came the Renaissance and the 
sign was lifted to its wooden feet, and 
once more its white head, now some- 
what soiled by the savage attacks, 
rose upon the horizon. 

But the students, returning to the 
college and filled with Christmas 
cheer and New Year's spirits, came 
to the aid of the party and the sign 
went down again in the rush — this 
time flat on its face. 

Down Rut Not Out 
From what was last seen, the sign 
was still down— this time maybe for 
good. But who knows? It may rise 
again. The P.W.A. boys are "sign" 
sorrowfully but they must have some- 
thing up their collective sleeves. 
P.W.A. -Persistence Wins Always. 



Sigma Iota 

Ida Davis has been elected secre- 
tary of the pledges. 



BAY STATE REVUE 

Continued from Page 1 

Comic Skit 

Eugene Geiringer '38 
Musical Skit —Mutiny on the Pilot 
Members of Phi Lambda Tau 
Violin Selections 

Robert Cain '39 
Scene from Midsummer Night's Dream 
"Pyramus and Thisbe" 

Lawrence Levinson '38, William 
Graham '38, John Hoar '38, William 
Friedman '39, William Collins '38, 
Ivan Cousins '39 
Selections by college band 



Sigma Beta Chi 

Sigma Beta Chi will hold its pledge 
formal at the Hill's Memorial from 8 
until 11:30. Ed Cerruti and his 
orchestra will play. 

Col. and Mrs. Aplington, Dr. and 
Mrs. Radcliffe, Mrs. Broughton and 
Mrs. Flanders will be the patrons and 
patronesses. Kay Birnie, social chair- 
man, is in charge. 

Tho«e Attending 
The following is a list of those who 
will attend: Dorothy Brown, George 
Haylon; Gladys Sawinski, Frank 
Merton Lyon; Lucille Monroe, Charles 
Thimblin of Southbridge; Catherine 
Birnie, William Johnson; Priscilla 
Bradford, Robert Couhig; Elinor 
Stone, Lawrence Fullerton of Stough- 

ton. 

Ruth Todt, Ralph Gates; Ruth 
Kinsman, Robert Fisher of North- 
ampton; Joy Moore, Walter Lewis; 
Edith Priest, James A. Valenkire Jr. 
of Walpole; Elizabeth Boucher, Rob- 
ert Perriello, Frances Merrill, James 
King. 

Loia Macomber, Donald Cowles; 
Eva Eldridge, William Graham; Olive 
Norwood, Alexander Alexion; Eliza- 
beth Clapp, Thomas Wakefield; Stella 



Crowell, Freda Whittemore; Evelyn 
Parker, Jack Slocum; Elaine Milkey, 
James Olivier. 

Mary E. Bates, William Foley; Rita 
Buckley, William McKinney; Marjorie 
Litchfield, Gordon Najar; Doris Dyer, 
Rex Avery; Marjorie Damon, Norman 

Blake. 

Betty Reynolds, Leroy Clark; Ruth 



Kuusela, Robert Spiller; Dorothy 
Rourke, Edmond Stawiecki; Janet 
Campbell, Henry H. Smith; Anne 
Corcoran, Fletcher Prouty; Helen 
Hallas, Gardner Anderson; Jacqueline 
Stewart, Richard Towle. 

Dorothea Smalley, Norman Grant; 
Elizabeth Spofford, Lloyd Copeland; 
Nancy Parks, Ivan Cousens; Justina 
Crosby, William Harrison; Belva 
Sinclair, Elmer Hallowell; Rita An- 
derson, Robert Cashman; Ruth Wad- 
dell, Fred Davis. 

Sigma Iota 
Sylvia Goldsmith '37 and Martha 
Kaplinsky '38 are in charge of Sigma 
Iota's informal pledge dance to be 
held on Friday. The chaperones are 
to be Dr. and Mrs. Fraker and Mr. 
and Mrs. Ellert. 



Describes Work 
of High School 



"Your curiosity is no doubt aroused 
as to what place there can be for agri- 
culture in a city high school, but the 
Boston School Committee has dis- 
covered that there are many high 
school students who have a distinct 
tendency toward agricultural inter- 
ests," Thomas P. Dooley stated today 
in Convocation. 

Thomas P. Dooley graduated from 
this college in 1913 and is now head 
of the agricultural department in 
Jamaica Plain High School. He has 
always had a great interest in teach- 
ing and agriculture and he received 
his degree of Master of Education 
from Boston Teacher's College. 
Method of Instruction 
He continued in his speech on "The 
Relationship of Vocational Work in 
Secondary Schools to College" to tell 
how the agriculture is taught in the 
high schools by first-hand observation 
and doing, and how this training can 
be used in a city. 

Opportunities in Agriculture 
The city high school students are 
becoming aware of the opportunities 
that await the ambitious young man 
in occupation related to agriculture. 
but not usually classified as such, 
e.g. dairy distribution, fruit marketing, 
food processing, etc. The training 
that the students receive is in a large 
part by observation and learning to 
do by doing. 



GREETING CARDS 

for 

Sick or Convalescent 

friends 

miss Cutlers Gift Shop 



Shows Daily 2:30 6:30 * 8:30 

Fri.-Sat.. Jan. 8-9 

Johnny Weissmuller 

Maureen O'Sullivan 



in 



a 



Tarzan 



LIKE WINTER SPORTS? 

Come in and see our line of sporting equipment 

$2.95 and $4.95 pr. 

8.00 pr. 

2.50 pr. 

2.98 pr. 

75c and 1.00 ea. 



SKATES 

SKIIS 

POLES 

BINDINGS 

HOCKEY STICKS 

ATHLETIC SOCKS 



Escapes" 



also 

John Howard, Marsha Hunt, in 

"EASY TO TAKE" 



, J Plus: March of Time 



SPECIAL PRE-INVENTORY PRICE 

Men's Bostonian $10 Ski Boot 

$8.50 

Expertly developed for the Dartmouth Outing Club. 

Uppers of horsehide full leather lined. Special 

Steel Shank. Several other features. 



25c pr. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



Sun.-Mon.-Tue*., Jan. 10-12 
MARLENE DIETRICH 



in 



'"GARDEN 
OF 
ALLAH"! 

added 
Jimmy Lunceford Band 
Deadly Females News 

Popeye Cartoon 



JOHN WINTER AND SON LTD. 

Carnoustie, Scotland 

British Made 

BLACK BROWN 

Damp-proof double soles Full leather lined 

$7.45 

ALL SALES CASH 

Bolles Shoe Store 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Town Hall 

Try our high-claaaod work 
Popular Price* Work Guaranteed I 



Ski Parkas Navy or White Special values at $5.00 

Ski Mittens Waterproof back Buckskin palm $2.00 
Ski Sox 65c to $1.00 
Sale prices on Suits, Overcoats, Shirts. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Clothes for College Men for forty-fh* ywa 



College Candy Kitchen 



CANDY 

Select out of our lines 

PAGE & SHAW KEMP CYNTHIA SWEETS 



FOUR NEW ART EXHIBITS OPEN to have chimes 
ON CAMPUS DURING THIS WEEK 



pour new art exhibits opened on 
,| u , , am pus this week at Memorial 
Building, Goodell Library, Wilder 
u ,n and the Physical Education 

Building- 

Most Important of Year 

At Memorial Hall is being shown 

[f u most important exhibit of the 

vea r. according to Professor Waugh: 

. | ,,l!i otion of oil paintings by Clifford 

\ Bayard. Mr. Bayard, who taught 

ting in Carnegie Institute of 

Technology until eight years ago, has 

been painting for many more years, 

and his collection contains works 

ranging from one done ten years ago 

to several that were completed only 

this fall. 

In the exhibition are represented 
several styles of painting; Gray Day 
and Hartwell Meadows were painted 
to show the character of the trees 
and landscape, and the time of day; 
they are simple, and lacking in detail; 
while West Dover and Ten Thousand 
Acres are almost photographic in 
color and detail. Windy Weather was 
painted to give an effect rather than 
a picture. 

Prefers Winter in New England 

Mr. Bayard prefers New England, 
and especially southern Vermont land- 
icapec to any other, and most of the 
paintings have for their subjects 
scene- from the country near his 
honn- in Wilmington, Vermont. Some 
f the paintings however were done in 
Nova Scotia, and one on the French 
Kiveria. There are several winter 
Kenes in the exhibition, both general 
and detailed, for Mr. Bayard prefers 
| the winter season in New England. 

The paintings were made from small 

[compositions of the landscape. For 

example, Mr. Bayard had about a 

[dozen canvases of West Dover before 

In completed the present painting. 

I Beside* oil paintings, Mr. Bayard has 

also made etchings, and pencil, and 

I pen and ink sketches. 

New Photograph Exhibit 

The new camera club exhibit, which 
I will he in the library from January 4 
Ito January 23, is from the Camera 
ICluh of New York City. This is the 
[original camera club of New York, 
|ari(i is probably the oldest in the 
country. 

Avery Slack, who had an exclusive 
[■xhiliit here last spring, is a member 
)f the club, and one of his most recent 
photographs is in the present display. 

This group contains many unusual 
Btudies of light and shadow, most out- 
standing being Perry Schofield's Land's 
C/irf. Norman Funk's Fugitive, and 
Bteb's Epilogue. There are some 
txulli nt character studies, although 
Vvery Slack's latest is not his best. 

The exhibits in Wilder Hall and the 
E%yac*J Education Building are not 
Up yet, but will be hung in the latter 
part of the week. 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 
By Expert Barbers 
'.'orth Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



Bayard to Discuss 
Painting Collection 

Clifford A. Bayard, formerly pro- 
fessor of painting at the Carnegie 
Institute and now of Wilmington, 
Vermont, will be presented by the 
Fine Arts Council Tuesday afternoon, 
Jan. 12 at 4.30 p.m. in the Memorial 
Building. 

He will discuss the collection of his 
paintings which are now on display 
in Memorial Hall. 

SCORE; ONE DOWN, 
ONE MARRIED AND 
ONE IS PUBLISHED 



J. Paul Williams, director of reli- 
gious education, is ill with influenza 
at his home in North Amherst, where 
he is reported to be "resting comfort- 
ably." Mr. Fellows is substituting 
for him. 



At a fashionable ceremony in the 
First Baptist Church in New Rochelle, 
N. Y., Frank B. Stratton, instructor 
of music at M.S.C, married Miss 
Myra Coffin of New Rochelle on 
Dec. 28. Mrs. Stratton, an instructor 
of music at the Mary Burnham School 
for Girls in Northampton, is a gradu- 
ate of Smith and is a pianist of repute. 
The couple will make their home on 
Pleasant Street, Amherst. 



The address on the Honor System, 
given at a recent convocation by Dr. 
Maxwell H. Goldberg, professor of 
English here, has been published in the 
quarterly journal of Phi Kappa Phi, 
national scholastic society, and an- 
other address made in New York last 
spring in connection with a conference 
in the field of speech entitled "Creative 
Imitation" has appeared in the Dec. 
number of the Emerson Quarterly. 



SIGMA XI CERTIFICATES 

Continued from Page 1 
next April. If the Sigma Xi Club is 
awarded membership, it will be able 
to elect to it underclassmen and 
graduates who show aptitude in re- 
search. 

Dr. C. R. Fellers, secretary of the 
club, announces that the club will 
sponsor one more lecture on campus. 
The speaker and date are as yet 
indefinite. 

MEET AT 

BARSELOTTFS CAFE 

BALLANTINE'S ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 
Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



Standard Dairies Calendar and Desk Pads Expense Books 

Eaton's Prinscript new styles in printed stationery 

A. J. Hastings ^s^Sr 1 17 So. Pleasant St. 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
work called for and delivered Telephone 828 




OLD CHAPEL 



OLD CHAPEL 

Continued from Page 1 
cast by the Meneely Bell Co. in Troy, 
N. Y., and when installed will be 
operated from a control on the second 
floor of the chapel. The present chapel 
bell, long used to announce athletic 
victories, classes, and vespers, will be 
suspended above the chimes. The 
chimes will be installed before the 
next commencement. A formal dedi- 
cation is being planned for Saturday, 
May 1. 

Plans for New A. B. 
Degree Committee 

The Student Senate has tentative 
plans for the formation of a new 
committee for the A.B. degree. The 
present move on the part of the Senate 
follows an extended period of dorman- 
cy in active effort to obtain the 
degree, a period dating back to the 
beginning of the present college year. 

The Senate is now contacting vari- 
ous students known to be advocates 
of the A.B. movement, and, while 
there have been as yet no definite 
appointments, it is likely that the new 
committee will soon be named. Mem- 
bers of the present committee are: 
Henry Moss '36, chairman; Julian 
Katzeff '38, Herbert Brown '38, Elisa- 
beth Streeter '38, and George Haylon 
'39. 



NEW TRISTEK 

Continued from Page 1 
state treasurer, will serve on the 
board of trustees as a member ex- 
officio and as president. 

These new appointments bring the 
number of changes on the board of 
trustees to three during Curley's 
administration, the other being the 
addition of William C. Monahan, who 
was appointed last February. 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 

Winter Sports 

Togs lead 

the line 




We stock the finest Ski Clothing 
in this part of the country. 

Ski Suit* PnrknN Svrnlorw 

Ski Hoot* official model) 

Outfits for Men and Women 



GRAYSON OUTLINES SCOPE OF 
WORK OF PLACEMENT SERVICE 



W. J. Kitchen Speaks 
At Vespers Sunday 

On Sunday, Jan. 10, at f> p.m. on 
the Memorial Building, W. J. Kitchen, 
executive secretary of the New Eng- 
land Christian Movement, will speak 
on the Student Christian Movement. 

Mr. Kitchen appeared at the Phi 
Sigma Kappa house last year as 
speaker with Religious Embassy. 

EIGHT MORE DAYS 
REMAINS TO ENTER 
SYMBOL CONTEST 



doing, going, $18 in prizes for the 
best college symbol submitted to the 
secretary's office by Jan. 15. 

Announced in the Collegian on Dec. 
3, the contest for the selection of a 
college symbol draws to a close next 
week Friday. Entries will be accepted 
until 5 o'clock, Jan. 15 and should be 
submitted in a sealed envelope ad- 
dressed to Judges of College Symbol 
Contest. 

The competition is open to all 
students, undergraduate or graduate, 
and decision of the judges will be 
based upon the idea presented rather 
than the skill with which the suggested 
symbol is drawn. 

The committee reserves the right 
to reject all proposals. 



M ASSAC II I SETTS STATE 

ART CALENDARS 

Just arrived - Ready for mailing. 

A Inn- Noiivonir 

Ei<ery student will want one of these 

attractive calendars with six views 

of the campus. 

GET YOURS EARLY AT 

THE COLLEGE STORE 



"Many students fail to realise and 
appreciate the possibilities offered by 
the Placement Service of the college." 
explained Mr. Kniory Grayson, Direc- 
tor of the Placement Service, yester- 
day, as he outlined the scope of the 
work of the service. 

The office aids many needy students 
in obtaining jobs while they are in 
attendance at the college and also 
furnishes information as to the oppor- 
tunities in the town for employment. 
In addition, the placement office helps 
seniors in placement after graduation. 
It maintains a permanent department 
for the placing of graduates of Massa- 
chusetts State Oollege after they have 
left the college. 

Summer Employment 
Students and graduates of the 
college are aided in obtaining employ- 
ment during the summer months, also; 
in the fields of business, agriculture, 
horticulture, and other types of work. 
At the present time, one of the 
major tasks of the office staff is the 
administration of vocational and per- 
sonnel guidance to students who are 
preparing for a career. "We are try- 
ing to get students thinking about 
their careers, professions, or vocations 
— to keep them career-minded," Mr. 
Grayson continued. 

"We try to keep them up to the 
minute in vocational trends and oppor- 
tunities to stimulate them to think 
along vocational lines." 

TliuNe Quest ioiiniiire* 

In answer to a query "concerning the 

questionnaires sent to the seniors, 

Continued on Page 6 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

SEANE>CNICC*# 

I 1 MAI I iNI 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
Foods and Beverage** 

Dine, Wine and Dance 



HYGEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



(ftifts for ilen 

Choose for your men friends, gifts that meet with men's 
approval. Here are some examples of what the man with 
thoughtful friends will receive. 

PACKARD ELECTRIC RAZOR $12.98 

DIGBY ENGLISH IMPORTED PIPES 2.00 

BRIGGS PIPE TOBACCO 1 lb. 99c 

CIGARETTE CASES 

PIPE RACKS 

HUMIDORS 

MENNEN'S GIFT SETS 

GILLETTE RAZOR SET 

TOBACCO POUCHES 

WELLWORTH PHARMACY 

TUB CUT RATE STORE 



1.25 
1.25 
1.50 
1.00 
1.45 
1.00 



EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



TIIK MASSAC III SKITS COLUKUAN. Till KSl>AY, JAM AKY 7. 1937 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



NETTLETON SHOES 

If you have trouble with your feet, try a pair of 
NETTLETON ALGONQUINS 



7 

9 

11 

25 

31 



KVKNTS OF TIIK YKAH 

Continued from Page 1 
May 

1 Frank Dailey plays at interfra- 
ternity ball. 

Grapevine edition of Collegian. 

Mothers' Day. 

Patterson Players present The 

Queen's Husband. 
Collegian extra announces death 

of Ex-President Lewis. 
Canoe exhibition on college pond. 

Jim*' 

2 Kappa Sigma tops all fraternities 
in athletics and academics. 

5^ Annual Horse Show. 
6 Roister Doisters present Shaw's 
You Never Can Tell. 
Professor Sears retires. 
Soph-Senior Hop with Hudson- 
Delange orchestra. 
September 
Registration exceeds all previous 
records. 

October 
8j 121 freshmen pledge fraternities. 
8i Phi Kappa Phi elects 13 from 

£ senior class. 
16 Fernald anniversary exercises. 



6 

8 



24 



19 Harold Bauer at Social Union. 

21 Another mountain day. 

22 Collegian poll picks Landon, 

Lodge and Haigis. 

23 Girls present pageant at dedica- 

tion of new athletic field. 

24 Dads' Day with a new high in 

attendance. 
31 Amherst wins football game. 

Novent ber 

5 Alumni radio program. 

6 Hort show presents a formal theme 
16 Music organization presents Ernst 

Wolfe. 
19 Analysis of courses for A.B. 

degree made. 
19 Statesmen defeat Rensselaer 40-0 
in football. 

December 
1 Ring committee selects permanent 

class ring. 
3 President Baker opens contest for 
college symbol. 

3 Renovation of old Chapel begun. 

4 Felix Ferdinando plays at Mili- 

tary Ball. 
11 Prudence impostor found on the 
campus. 
Don Cossacks at Social Union. 



SKM'kltltllHiK 

I Continued from Page 2 
Officers Klected 

The permanent officers of the class 
of S'38 were elected at a special meet- 
ing of the class. They are as follows: 

' president, Henry Griffin; vice-presi- 
dent, James Jenkins; secretary, Eliza- 
beth Pieper; treasurer, S. DeBonis. 

Student Council members are James 
Deary and Edwin Helander. 



of Elmer Allen, open their season 
Monday at Deerfield. This will be 
followed with a game at Williston on 
Wednesday. With the material on 
hand, Coach Allen expects to have a 
strong outfit. 



Convocation 

At the January 5th convocation 
Professor E. Bell of the department 
of economics spoke on "The New 
England Dairy Marketing Situation." 



in agriculture and related fields, con 
ducted by Mr. Emory Grayson; and 
the placement activities of all Othft 
students, directed by Prof. Guy V. 
Glatfelter. 



A. T. G. 

Red Andrews has been appointed 
chairman of the committee in charge 
of the annual formal dinner dance. 
Arrangements have been made with 
the management of the Lord Jeff for 
the party to be held there late in 
February. 



Hockey 

The hockey team, under the tutelage 



PLACKMKNT SKKVICK 

Continued from Page 5 
Mr. Grayson explained that they were 
sent out to get the seniors to talk and 
think about work after graduation 
before they graduated, not to wait 
until the last minute. The seniors are 
encouraged to come in to the office to 
see what suggestions and guidance the 
office may give them. 

In the spring, personnel men from 
various industries will visit the place- 
ment office of the college to discuss 
opportunities and to investigate the 
qualifications of the seniors of M.S.C. 
The Placement Service at Massa- 
chusetts State College is composed of 
three major divisions: the women's 
placement activities, under the super- 
vision of Miss Margaret Hamlin; the 
placement activities for Stockbridge 
students and college students majoring 



ANNOl NCEMKNTS 

Continued from Page 1 

Westley Foundation 

The weekly meeting of the Westley 
Foundation will be held on Sunday 
evening, January 10, at the home of | 
Dr. and Mrs. Adrian Lindsey on 
Mount Pleasant. Those interested are 
invited to attend. 



International Relations Club 

Reports by the delegates to the 
International Relations Clubs con- 
ference at Clark University will be 
read at the regular meeting on Tues- 
day evening, Jan. 12, at 7 p.m. in 
Room 102, Stockbridge. Following 
the reports, there will be a general! 
discussion of Democracy vs. Dictator-] 
ship and The Far East. All interested 
students are invited to attend. 




SAN FRANCISCO 



on a nezo cruise 



#arrying more pleasure to more people 
...giving smokers what they want 
. . . Chesterfields are off on a new cruise. 

From Wake Island 5000 miles out in 
the Pacific Ocean, Pan American Airways 
flashed this radio: 

"RUSH TEN THOUSAND CHESTERFIELDS 
TODAY'S CHINA CLIPPER." 



At three o'clock that afternoon the 
Chesterfields were on their way. Four 
days later back came the message: 

"CHESTERFIELDS JUST ARRIVED. 

FAST WORK. 

PAN AIR WAKE." 

When smokers find out the good 
things Chesterfields give them . . . 

nothing else will do 



COMMUNITY 
CONCERT 
TUESDAY 




U. A. C. Library. 



Monro 



SYMBOL 
CONTEST 
CLOSING 



oh XLVII 



AMHERST. MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



No. 14 



rosh Mental Rating 
Up Two Percentiles 



;iass of 1940 is Superior 
to 72% of Freshmen in 
Colleges Throughout the 
Country 

The class of 1940 at Massachusetts 
Ctat<- College scored in the 73 per- 
centile in the markings of the fresh- 
en psychological examinations which 
Aere given at the beginning of the 
Llltci- year, according to statistics 
iom Dr. H. N. Glick, head of the 
department of psychology. 

These figures denote that the State 

reshmen are superior to 72$ of all the 

.shmen in all the other colleges in 

he United States which gave the 

Jxaminations. 

The 73 percentile rating is 2 per- 
centiles higher than the average for 
|he class of 1939 which, last year, was 
pared < n the 71 percentile. 

Girls Rnnk Higher 
I n-hmen girls, with an average of 
&:)0. r ) were superior to the boys by a 
run nf .0385. Dr. Glick announced 
hat this result is found every year — 
[iris usually have a better average 
tan the boys. This situation is due 
the fact that girls mature earlier 
han the boys and, consequently reach 
more mature intelligence level before 
he hoys do. 

Iti.se tests are given throughout 
M country under the direction of the 
Lineman Council of Education. About 
fit o.| leges in the United States ad- 
minister the examinations to entering 
feshmen, and the scores are sent to 
Washington where they are tabulated 
nd omipared. 

Une 

As in past years, the administration 
planning to utilize the scores in 
etermining the correlation between 
Jitelligonce and marks of the students 
the various college courses. 
Acc ord ing to the percentile system 
rating, the class of 1940, in the 73 
Continued on Page 6 



IIGHT0FJAN.16'T0 
BE GIVEN IN HAMP 



"t special interest to campus play- 
t>' HI ihouM be the presentation by 
Northampton Players of Ayn 

and's Xight of January 16th, to be 
Iven it the Student Building in 
lorthampton, Friday and Saturday 
renings nf this week. The play is the 
Ime one which the Roister-Doisters 
111 present in Bowker Auditorium 
|te in February. 

Kohertson in (nsl 
lAppeiii-jng in the Northampton 
payers' production will be James 
Nftrtoon, .Jr., of the college depart- 
Bn t cl mdscape architecture. Mr. 
obertsii, will play the part of the 
Hrp. li, has appeared with this 
toup oj actors before, in Merry-Go- 
Dunrf. S int Joan, Elizabeth the Queen 
M Rui from Heai'en. He designed 
PWl foi Rain from Heaven. 
Kutca | ;,e play involves an ending 
]°ught .'.out by the character of the 
mi and he type of jury drawn from 
W audi. ,,.« to decide a case, it will 
inter,- i „g to compare results of 
impton production with 
r own campus production. 

Ticket** 

"cketa may be secured at Butler 
* 'I n„ n's in Northampton, on 
Thursday and Friday 
!) ll > [ r > o'clock. 



PLAYS TUESDAY 



NEW COLLEGE 
RADIO SERIES 
STARTS SOON 

Liberal Arts Program 
Over WSPR Monday 

Another series of college radio 
broadcasts scheduled for Monday af- 
ternoons at 2:30 over WSPR in 
Springfield was announced this week 
by Francis C. Pray of the College 
News Service. 

The new series will be in the nature 
of a Liberal Arts broadcast and will 
be directed by Professor Frank P. 
Rand. Next Monday's program is to 
include a discussion of miracle plays 
with an illustrative dramatization 
from "On Corpus Christi Day" by 
members of the Roister Doisters. 
Second Sport* Program 

The second of the series of Winter 
Sports broadcasts will take place this 
afternoon at 5 o'clock, also from 
station WSPR. Featured this week 
will be Jarvis Schauffler, Massachu- 
setts champion of downhill skiing. 
Continued on Page 6 

Musical Clubs Plan 
Program for Friday 

Another in the series of combined 
dance and entertainment programs 
designed to raise funds to support the 
operetta will be presented tomorrow 
evening in Memorial Hall under the 
auspices of the Combined Musical 
Clubs. 

Appearing on the program will be 
the String Ensemble, Bob Cain in a 
new violin novelty; Vernon Coutu in 
a group of trumpet solos; John Osmun, 
tenor; Walter Epstein in a group of 
readings; a small group from the 
band; Sam Shaw; and Carlos Fraker. 

Chaperones for the vie party follow- 
ing the entertainment will be Prof, 
and Mrs. Clark L. Thayer and Prof, 
and Mrs. Arthur French. The enter- 
tainment will begin at 7:30. 




Biagini Scheduled for 
Winter Carnival Ball 



JESUS MARIA SANROMA 



Jesus Sanroma 
Pianist, to Play 
In Next Concert 



Jesus Maria Sanroma, pianist of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will 
play at the second of the Amherst 
Community Concerts of the 1936-37 
season to be presented on Tuesday 
evening, Jan. 19, in Stockbridge Hall. 
Pro&rnm 

Mr. Sanroma's program 
sist of the following: 

1. Sonata in I) major 
Two Impromtus 

G-flat major 

B-flat major 
Sonata in C minor (Pathetiquej 

Adagio-allegro 

Adagio . .nit. il. it.- 

Rondo 
Variations of "Mary Had A Little Lamb 
In the styles of ten different composers 

Mozart (Agneletto in C) 

Beethoven (Adagio) 

Schubert (Demi- moment Musirale) 

Chopin (Nocturne posthumous) 

Wagner (Siuriliii.il scene and Kestmahl) 

Tschaikowsky (V'alser Funebre) 

Grieg (Mrks Klnh Lmbl) 

McDowell (At a Lamb) 

Debussy (The Evening of a Lamb) 

Liszt ((".ramie Btudt dC CMOMt) 
Two Puerto Kiom Dances 

Felices Dias 

No me tOQUnl 
Tw.i BpuUh Dun et 

D.ltue uf the Millet 

Ritual Kire Dance 

Continued on Page 6 



2. 



.'». 



will con- 



Schubert 



Recthoven 



I. 



< 'iimfios 



Valla 



GOV. HURLEY TO 

ORDER SURVEY 

OF COLLEGE 

Dean Holmes of Harvard 
To Determine Savings in 
Cost of Administration 

Charles F. Hurley, new governor of 
the Commonwealth and president ex- 
officio of the Board of Trustees of 
Massachusetts State College, enlivened 
his first meeting with the Trustees 
yesterday, by a rapid-fire questioning 
of Dr. Hugh P. Baker about conditions 
at the college. At the conclusion of 
the meeting the governor declared he 
would order a survey of the college by 
Dean Henry W. Holmes of the Har- 
vard Graduate School of Education, 
to determine what savings could be 
made in the cost of administration. 

Other developments at the meeting 
as outlined last night by Robert B. 
Hawley, secretary of the college, were 
as follows: 

(1) The same officers of the Trus- 
tees were re-elected; Governor Hurley, 
Continued on Page 3 

Appoint New A.B. 
Degree Committee 

A newly formed A.B. degree com- 
mittee will take up the duties of last 
year's group, next week, when the 
four present members and two new 
appointees meet to elect a chairman 
and arrange plans to carry the request 
for an arts degree before the State 
students, faculty and trustees. 

The present members include Shirley 
Bliss '38, Herbert Brown '38, Frederick 
Lindstrom '38 and George Haylon '39. 
Two members from the sophomore 
class are to be chosen this week to 
fill the remaining board positions. One 
of the new appointees will be a co-ed 
and the other will be a science major. 
The other committeemen are students 
who are majoring in Knglish and 
economics. 



Collegian Business Board Conducts 



Survey of Student Spending Uptown 



m n, 



How many times during the week 
do you visit the retail center of 
Amherst? 

A survey of 250 representative 
students, conducted by the business 
board of the Collegian, under the 
supervision of Kenwood Ross, shows 
that last year the average student 
pushed his pedal extremities uptown 
about two or three times a week. 
And he seems to have used his time 
there to better advantage than heck- 
ling the blue boys, bumming to Hamp, 
and passing the time of day with 
Dean Burns. 

For instance, the average student 
annually whiles away time varying 
from 35.7 hours to 107.1 hours stamp- 
ing his feet and booing at villains in 
the Amherst Theatre at a cost of 
from $5 to $15 to the alma pater. 
He finds that in order to keep his 
feet shod suitably for maximum 



stamping performance he must spend 
an average of $8.00 per year on shoes, 
of which $3.00 is left in Bolles. 

A Haircut Every 13 Day* 

It is no rarity on this campus to 
have the hair apparent of a student 
get cut off without a cent. But most 
students prefer to exercise their own 
prerogative in the matter of haircuts. 
Thus it is that the average student 
shambles into a barber shop about 
once every thirteen days, beams ap- 
provingly at the pseudo-military salute 
preferred by a line of white-liveried 
barbers, and has his locks shorn. The 
annual outlay for looking tidy is 
allocated to the tidy sum of $10, 
divided equally between Nap Mercier 
and the barber corps uptown. A few 
students further enhance their natural 
charm by an additional expenditure 
of $5.00 left in parts unknown. 

Now that the typical student is 



resplendent in a new haircut, he must 
have clothes that will sit him well. 
His annual outlay for clothing totals 
$35, of which $24.50 is spent in a 
lump outside of town presumably for 
a flashy suit with collegiately short, 
baggy trousers. Uptown, Thompson 
and Walsh pocket the remainder of 
the sum spent for sartorial perfection. 

Tli.it KngliMh 71 Influeiiee 

If the average student has any in- 
clination for the collection of his own 
private library, he humors it along 
with a meagre pittance of $3.00 per 
annum. This he spends in bookstores 
other than those specializing in college 
texts. It is quite possible that the 
$3.00 also buys a magazine or two 
that even in these modern times still 
retains some of the spontaneity and 
zest and exuberance and elan of those 
inimitable Elizabethans. 

Continued on Page 6 



Played at Soph-Senior Hop 
in 1934; Tickets, $4.00 
per Couple, go on Sale 
next Monday 

Henry Biagini and his orchestra 
have been secured as entertainers for 
the Winter Carnival Ball, John Glick, 
chairman of the ball committee, an- 
nounced recently. The ball is to be 
held the evening of February 12, dur- 
ing the carnival week-end. 

The band will consist of Biagini 
himself and a group of fourteen, in- 
cluding Selda Castle, vocalist. 
Here Before 

Biagini has appeared on campus be- 
fore. His orchestra was featured at 
the Sophomore-Senior hop of 1934. 
Biagini has been recognized as a leader 
of some repute, having led the original 
Casa Loma orchestra. The style of his 
present band is said to approximate 
that of the present Casa Loma organi- 
zation. It may be heard nightly over 
WAAB in Boston, at 11 o'clock. 

The dance will be held in the Drill 
Hall, from 9 to 2. Tickets will go on 
sale Monday at $4.00 per couple. 

Tickets may be secured from John 
Glick, chairman, Fred Sievers, Ruth 
Wood '38, Norman Blake, Howard 
Steff and Bob Packard. Chaperones 
will be announced later. 

New Ski Trail 

Other winter carnival developments 
include the construction of a new ski 
trail on Bull Hill. The construction of 
this trail was supervised by Philip 
Layton '37, chairman of the head 
committee of the carnival. Bull Hill 
will be the scene of the invitation 
Continued on Page 6 



ONE DAY LEFT IN 
SYMBOL CONTEST 

One more day remains for those who 
yet wish to enter the college symbol 
contest in competition for $18 in 
prizes. The contest, the rules of 
which were announced in the (-ollegtan 
of December 3, will close tomorrow 
afternoon at 5 o'clock. All entries 
should be submitted in a sealed enve- 
lope to the Judge's of the College 
Symbol Contest. 

All graduate and undergraduate 
students are eligible for the contest. 
The winning entry will be selected 
more for its idea than for its artistic 
quality, and will be adopted as the 
standard and official symbol of the 
college. No part of the state seal 
may be used. 

Announcement of the winners of 
the contest will appear in an early 
edition of the Collegian. 



Tuberculosis Fund 
Aided by Students 

Through the activities of the fra- 
ternities and sororities, the fund for 
aiding tuberculosis was increased by 
$33.25. 

The heads of the various organiza- 
tions conducted the drive in coopera- 
tion with the local authorities, and the 
results were encouraging. From a small 
beginning, this idea has swept the 
country and aided hundreds of tuber- 
cular cases as well as providing sana- 
toriums for their care. 



Copyright 1937. Liggitt * MyimTo»acco Co. 



TMK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14. 1937 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 







flftageacbugeWy Collegian 

Official ne^paper of the Massachusetts State College. Published every Thursday by the students , 

LOUIS A. BREAULT '37, Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK L1NDSTROM '38. Managing Editor WALTE R GURALNICK '37, Associate Edito r 



•W4 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Campus 
PHILIP B. SHIFT '37, Editor 
RICHARD C. DESMOND '37 
JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER '38 
MAURICE TONKIN "38 
THOMAS J EN RIGHT 39 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE "39 
ELEANOR WARD 39 
MABELLE BOOTH 39 
BETTINA HALL 39 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWICZ 40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART 40 
SUSAN E. STUTSMAN 40. Secretary 



Athletic* 
JULIAN H. KATZEFF 38. Editor 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN '38 
ALFRED M. SWIREN "38 
JOHN E. FILIOS '40 
ARTHUR A. NOYES '40 

Make-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37. Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

Stockbrldfte Correspondents 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S"37 
WESLEY NUTTER S'38 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 




WANTED: Any information 
leading to the wlierenbout* of our 
favorite joke- hook, cither lout, 
Ntriiyed, or «wiped from the Col- 
legian office. You'd better return 
it hefore we Ktiirt to Jfcet original. 



"Wanna peanut?" 

"Oh, thank you." 

"Wanna neck?" 

"No." 

"Then gimme back my peanut. 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37, Business Manager 

Business Assistants 

CLIFFORD E. SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH 37. Circulation Mgr. 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON # 38. Subscription Mgr. 
WILLIAM B. GRAHAM 38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON 38 
MITCHELL F. NEJAME '38 DONALD L. SILVERMAN 38 
ABRAHAM CARP '39 CHARLES RODDA 39 
ALLEN GOVE 39 HENRY WINN 39 



He (at the movies): "Can you see 
aU right?" 
She: "Yes." 

He: "Is there a draught on you?" 
She: "No." 
He: "Is your seat comfortable?" 

She: "Yes." 

He: "Will you change places with 

me?" 



tVUIIA 
CALENDAR 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



Make all orders payable to Tk* Massachusetts 
ColUgia*. In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager as soon as 
possible. Alumni, undergraduate and faculty con- 
tributions are sincerely encouraged. Any communi- 
cations or notices must be received at the Cotttgian 
office before 9 o'clock. Monday evening. Phone 132-W 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post 
Office Accepted for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917. 
authorized August 20. 1918. 



Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North Street. 
Northampton. Mass. Telephone 554. 



|Q36 Member 1917 

Associated GoUe6iate Press 

Distributors of 

Colle6iaJeDi6esf 

KIPSIIINTIO FOR NATIONAL ADVSBTISINO BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative* 
AZO Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 

Boston . San Francisco 

PORTLANO . aiATTLS 



Chic ' CO • 
LOS ANDELII 



"Hello\ HelM Is this the maternity 
ward?" 

"Yes." 

"Do you deliver babes?" 

" Yes." 

"Well, I'm staying at the Lord Jeff 
with a friend of mine. Send over a 
couple." 



Thursday, Jan. 14 

7::i0 p.m. Band rehearsal, Memorial Bids. 
8:00 p.m. Women s Glee Club, Stockbridge 
«:(J0 p m. Hockey, Northeastern at Boston 
Friday, Jan. lb 

7:30 p.m. Dancing Clasj, Drill Hall 
7:30 p.m. Musical Clubs, Entertainment 
and Dance. Memorial Building 
Saturday, Jan. 16 

3:00 p.m. Swimming. W.P.I, at Worcester 
8:00 p.m. Basketball. Amherst at M.S.C. 
KKK) p.m. Vic Parties: Phi Lambda Tau. 

Alpha Gamma Rho 
8:15 p.m. Hockey, Hamilton at Clinton 
Sunday, Jan. 17 

5:00 p.m. Vespers. Prof. James T. Cleland, 
Amherst College 
Monday, Jan. 18 

3:30 p.m. Hockey. New Hampshire, here 
Tuesday, Jan. 19 

4-H Leaders Training School 
8:00 p.m. Community Concert, Sanroma 
Wednesday, Jan. 20 

4-H Leaders Training School 
8:00 p.m. Basketball. Wesleyan. here 
Thursday, Jan. 21 

11:00 a.m. Convocation. Dr. William P. 
Ryan of Holyoke. Commander of the 
Dept. of Mass. American Legion 
4-H Leaders Training School 



s 

3= 



Communications 



The MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN lot, 
not necessarily agree with or oppose opi: ,.,, 
voiced in this column. Communications r*j 
not be signed, but the identity of the »u 
must be known to the editor-in-chief. 



MORAL 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

The talent and life shown a' thtl 
Bay State Revue is an inspiring ei.l 
ample of latent enthusiasm in tM 
student body. We need more of thJ 
enthusiasm and spirit displayed, mort' 
and even better Revues — our col] _ 
should mean a good deal more thanl 
all work. Spirit should not be allowed! 
to stagnate. The cry of Mass. Staul 
spirit must not be that of Pyramus,~\ 
dying, dying, dying — dead. Alack-a 
day. 

— Milton Reiser 



Announcements 



Stockbridge 



Fernald Club Meeting 

There will be a meeting of the 
Fernald Entomological Club tonight 
in Fernald Hall, Room H, at 7. The 
motion pictures "Horses and Bots" 
and "Beware the Japanese Beetle" 
will be shown. 



CDITC-QIAL 



A PENALTY , . . 

There seems to be a penalty inflicted by the general run of 
students on those undergraduates who by their interest m extra- 
curricular, attain that vague something known as campus 
Prominence." And, as might be expected, the instigators of that 
penalty are either ignorant or troubled with a case of sour-grape 

Phll0 It° P seims that persons holding class or other elective offices 
must be immediately classed as politicians, in the worst sense of 
the word. It seems that persons who become members of such 
organizations as Adelphia, Maroon Key and the Senate, where 
popularity is a recognized requisite for membership, are smoothies 
and grabbers after vain glory. It seems that students connected 
with organizations where the handling of money is necessary are 
Scrooge* mercenaries. Students who turn their natural ability to 
organizations where the competition is keen and a place of honor 
is the result of hard work are "suckers." Phi Kappa Phis are 

"course crabbers." , ... 

The only people of prominence on campus upon whom this 
penalty is never inflicted are the athletes. They are the fine, 
upstanding, unselfish students. 

The grapevine lately has been buzzing more than ever with 
this penaltv-inflicting gossip. It has actually hurt a lot of people 
who in the final analvsis. are doing just exactly what the athletes 
are doing making the most of their natural ability. 

For it is natural ability that makes a person well-enough liked 
to be elected to an academic, honorary or class position. It is 
natural ability coupled with plenty of work that makes a person 
a food singer*, an actor, a musician yes, even a member of the 

Colleeion staff. , , 

It would be an interesting existence if everyone took stock 
of his limitations and abilities and so conducted his life that he 
worked, studied and played within them. It would be interesting 
too. if everyone realized the possibility that his neighbor might 
be a bit more clever and more capable than himself. 

No one ever gets anywhere by talking too much about the 
other fellow, especially when such talk is directed anywhere but 
directly to the person mentioned. . 

We are glad of the success various students are making and 
have made at the college. We wish them the best of luck when 
thev graduate. It is our opinion, and not a far-fetched one at 
that that success in college is but a prelude to success in later 
life. 



THE WINTKB CARNIVAL 

Within a month the Second Annual Winter Carnival will be 
a thing of the past at the college. The committee, under Chair- 
man Phil Layton has been working hard and it will not be their 
fault if the affair is not a success. 

The only thing lacking for a successful carnival this year is 
the snow, and there is a very good chance that the weather will 
take care of this for us. Everything else is in perfect order. 

The carnival will be more elaborate than it was last year. 
It has been more carefully planned. More and better facilities 
for those attending are certain. 

With these things in mind, students should take advantage 
of all that will be offered them in the way of entertainment and 
sport next month when the carnival gets under way Only it 
they do will more carnivals of this or even a better sort be under - 

e Those who are planning to have off-campus visitors should 
make arrangements immediately. Those planning to take part in 
tl e various events should begin preparing as soon as possible. 



A minister visited a fraternity 
Im.ii-..- and of course thought that 
everyone m\\A grace before and 
after meals. Nevertheless, he 
thought it best to inquire of n 
pledge and see if some of the new 
pledges understood the meaning 
of prayer. 

"Caspar Frosh," he asked the 
first urchin, "what do the boys 
do just before eating?" 

"They sing grace," replied 
Caspar. 

"And what do they Jlo after 

eating. 

"They just push back their 
chairs and belch," was the reply. 



Carnival Transportation 

Arrangements for Boston-Amherst 
transportation to Winter Carnival 
must be made before Jan. 25 with 
Ben Hurwitch, who may be reached 
at Tel. 8110. The price is $3.50 
round trip from Boston with propor- 
tionate deductions for transportation 
from points en route. Busses will 
leave Boston the noon of Feb. 12. 



Basketball 

The Stockbridge basketball team] 
came through with an easy win overij 
highly touted Amherst High team 
open their season. The team appeared! 
strong in both offensive and defensive! 
play. Bob Eisenhaur was high seorer.1 
garnering 14 points. Capt. Wajtkfel 
wicz was best defensively. 

The quintet played Suffield AcadeJ 
my yesterday as a preliminary to tht| 
M.S.C. -Conn. State game. 

A basketball practise for all whJ 
are not on the first and second tean| 
has been called for Thursday at 
o'clock. At this meeting anyone inter] 
ested in entering intra-mural eompe-| 
tition will be assigned to a team. 



Vespers 

At the Vesper service next Sunday 
at 5 o'clock in the Memorial Building, 
Professor James T. Cleland, assistant 
professor of religion at Amherst Col- 
lege, will speak on "Sin." 



MAY OCT EAST WARE MEN 
ARE MOM EN 

A couple of college students were 
bumming back to college a couple of 
nights ago from somewhere east of 
Ware when they found themselves 
stuck in Ware without a copper in 
their jeans. With a flash of commend- 
able pride, they decided that the 
gutter was no place for gentlemen of 
parts to spend the night. Besides, 
there are always trucks meandering 
through Ware looking for people in 
the gutter to run over. 

SO-o-o-o, the boys decided at the 
police station for accommodations. 
Everything was hunky-dunky until 
it was discovered that the gaol was 
filled Hp for the season: every cell in 
the men's section was filled to capacity, 
standing room only. The jailer-host, 
fearing for the welfare of his guests. 
decided against forcing college stud- 
ents, ol all things, upon them, re- 
moved his transients to a cell in the 
women's department. 

The point to the story is: wo(we)men 
must stick together. 



Fine Arts Speaker 

As the Fine Arts program for 
Tuesday, Jan. 19, Mr. John Theobald 
of the department of English at 
Amherst College will present "Some 
Readings from English Poetry." The 
program will take place at 4:30 o'clock 
in the Memorial Building. 
Index Board Meeting 

There will be an important meeting 
of the entire Index staff at the Index 
office in the Memorial Building today 
at 4:30. All members are expected 
to be present. 



Hockey 

Hockey candidates took to the i«| 
for the first time this week. Co 
Allen's charges were given a breail 
when the game scheduled with Deer! 
field was postponed due to lack of ictf 
Games with West Springfield audi 
Holyoke High are tentative. Then! 
games will be played at the M.S.C. I 
rink. 



Alpha Tau Ciamma 

Members of the house are planning 
Continued on Pageil 



l»re-Mcd Club 

There will be a meeting of the PnJ 
Med Club today at 7 in the 4-H Cluil 
House. Mr. Bradley of the physiology! 
department will talk on "Undulafll 
Fever -A Typical Public Healtif 
Problem." 



SWKKT MYSTERY OF LIFE 
Seen €»n the floor of n student's 

room: "If I nm studying when 

you enter, wake me up." 

— Northeastern 



She doesn't paint 
She doesn't rouge 
She doesn't smoke 
She doesn't boo*e 
She doesn't kiss 
She doesn't pet 
She's fifty-eight 
And single yet. 

— Swiped 



He called her his main support be- 
cause she always stood him up. 

— Hooked 



He who laughs last probably just 
got the joke 



Poem of the Month for January 



I.AKORKR POST-MORTEM 

Not the black earth that pressed, 

but the silence pressing in 

through the white pine sides; 

a coflin 

is such a narrow world. . . 

death 

is such a short word. . . 

he braced 
and went through 
from the black earth, 
from the silence 
to a field of flowers, 
ebony, red, and the purple 
of sunrise, and there were angels; 

this, said the angel, 
is a flower, observe it, 
the stamens open to life, 
the thin orangelust of the petals, 
the black earth feeding 

the hungry stalk; 

beauty that was never 

in my world, he said, I remember 

only the machines 

grinding their metalsong 

into me .... he sighed; 

tomorrow, said the angel, 
we shall study 

grass. 

fly: Sidney Kosen, 1939 
JmdgE l'rof. Arthur N. Julian 



CONN. STATE WINS IN LAST MINUTE, 41-37 



Ipucksters EDGE 2-1 

VICTORY OVER M.I.T. 



The hockey team broke even over 
t | H . week-end, dropping a game to the 
strong Army club at West Point, 
Saturday, 4-1, and edging M.I.T. on 
gjB College Pond, Monday, 2-1. 

Again led by wing, Bill Johnson, 
the Statesmen took the lead on the 
home ice and outplayed the Cambridge 
engineers all the way for a close win. 
With hut 3:51 minutes gone in the first 
period, Johnson took a pass from 
Bullock, beating goalie Rebori for the 
first score and it was not until four 
gecondfl before the end of the same 
canto that Tech evened the count. 
'Hi, . ngineer marker came when Cook 
beat Captain Al Ingalls on a pass from 
Acker. 

Faster skaters, the Technicians spent 
the last period rushing the State de- 
fense, but goalie Ingalls made numer- 
ous saves and defensemen Rossiter 
and Towle held off further attacks. 
On one of the few last period rushes 
Coach Ball's charges made on the 
Tech net, Johnson was on the scoring 
end of a Mayo-Bullock-Johnson pass 
play that had goalie Rebori sucked out 
on the wrong side of the cage. 

Although they did not figure in the 
storing plays, Niden, Towle and Rossi- 
ter showed the best form seen on the 
pond for the Statesmen. Rossiter 
was at his best stopping Tech's fast- 
skating line in a way that discouraged 
speed. 

At West Point, Saturday, Don 
Mayo, Bpare wing, pushed in the one 
State score, against the fast Army 
team. Not three goals better, but 
three goals stronger, the cadets gave 
the Statesmen a busy afternoon that 
will pay dividends in future contests. 

Mass. State M. I. T. 

lagals. u 8. Rebort 

Rossiter, rd rd. Eddy 

Towle. Id Id, Ililliker 

Mildram. c c. Cohen 

lamka* rw rw. Muther 

Niden, lw lw. Acker 

SoORs, Mass. State 2. M.I.T. 1. 

Mate si>ares, Mayo. Adams, Bullock. Linden, 
Johnson, llennessy, Morey. 

M.I.T. spare*. Minott, Drury, Deveber, Cook. 

Referees, Brogoli and My rick. 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Basketball 
Saturday, Amherst, here 
Wednesday, Wesleyan, here 

Hot- key 
Tonight, Northeastern at Boston 
Saturday, Hamilton at Clinton 
Monday, New Hampshire at M.S.C. 

Swimming 
Saturday, W.P.I, at Worcester 

Winter Track 
Interclass meet, Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
Sto. k bridge participating. 



TANKMEN IN 
51-26 WIN 



Winning all but one of the first 
places, the State swimming team in- 
augurated its season in grand style 
by decisively defeating Wesleyan, 51- 
26, in the Phys. Ed. pool last Saturday. 
In all, five new college and four new 
pool records were set. The victory 
marked the end of the Wesleyan jinx, 
for it was the first over the Cardinals 
in three years of intercollegiate com- 
petition. 

In the initial event the State 300- 
yard medley relay team of Rounds, 
Co-captain Hodder, and Howes set a 
new college record of 3:15.6 minutes. 
Although he had been ill for the 
previous week, Co-captain "Chick" 
Cutter won the 220- and 440-yard 
free style events in the record break- 
ing times of 2:28.8 and 5:24 minutes. 
Hodder set a new college record in the 
200-yard breast stroke event of 2:39.8 
minutes. Dean Rounds contributed 
the new record of 1:47.1 in the 150- 
yard backstroke event. Thurlow and 
Harrison placed first and second in 
the dives. In the final event of the 
afternoon, the 400-yard relay team of 
Cutter, Fisher, Calo, and Rounds set 
the new record of 3:51. Davis won 
the only Wesleyan first place in the 
100-yard free style event. 



Riel and Gzelusniak Star for 
M.S.C.; Pringlewith 21 
Points Leads Conn. State 
to Exciting Victory 

In one of the most exciting games 
ever witnessed in the M.S.C. cage, the 
Connecticut State quintet defeated 
Massachusetts State, 41-37, by sinking 
two baskets in the last minute of play. 
Pringle, Connecticut center, scored 
first to break a 37-37 tie, then with the 
timer ready with the gun to end the 
game, Ferguson scored the final basket 
to end the scoring. 

After five minutes of wild shooting 
by both teams, Pringle dented the 
twince for the first of his 21 points. 
Czelusniak and Riel put Mass. State 
out in front; but Conn. State forged 
ahead and led at the half 20-18. 

Riel tied the score at the beginning 
of the second half. From then on the 
lead see-sawed, Mass. State coming 
from behind five times to tie the score. 
With one minute of play left, Pringle 
and Ferguson set the stage for the 
Connecticut triumph. 

Riel and Czelusniak starred for 
Mass. State with 16 and 14 points re- 
spectively. The great height of Pringle 
was a constant bother to Mass. State 
under the basket, the Connecticut 
center repeatedly taking the ball off 
the backboard to end an M.S.C. threat. 



HOOPMEN TAKE 50-41 

WIN OVER WILLIAMS 



Chem Department 
Leads in Bowling 

With all games played through 
Tuesday, the Faculty Bowling League 
has developed some stern competition 
on the Memorial Building alleys with 
the Chemistry Department out in 
front with a total of ten points, leading 
nearest opponent, Social Science, by 4. 

Dairy with five and Fernald Hall and 
Bacteriology tied at four each are next 
in the rankings. Physical Education 
totals three, and Agricultural Econom- 
ics follows with two, while the Ad- 
ministration has been able to capture 
but one. The Math Department has 
failed to gain a point and trails along 
with the Dining Hall, South College 
and Horticulture. 



The Sigma Nua at Oregon State 
College have introduced the idea of 
having a hired chaperon at their 
fraternity during Saturday evenings. 



Peat Moss Imported From Holland 
Used As Material For Cage Floor 



SURVEY TO BE MA1>E 

Continued from Page 1 
president; Nathaniel Bowditch, vice- 
president; Mr. Kenney, treasurer; 
Mr. Hawley, secretary. 

(2) Reports of the president and 
treasurer were accepted. 

(3) The Trustees approved a new 
course in training for recreational 
leadership. 

(4) The Trustees approved a nature 
school on Mt. Toby in connection with 
the Summer School. 

(5) The Trustees voted to appoint 
a special committee of the Trustees, 
consisting of Mr. Bartlett, Mr. Bow- 
ditch and Dr. Baker, to confer with 
auditors on college accounts. 

Besides Governor Hurley, new Trus- 
tees present for the first time were 
Mrs. McNamara and Mr. Cassidy. 

Governor Hurley stated that he 
was interested in the number of stud- 
ents enrolled and the number of 
teachers employed with a view of as- 
certaining what are the expenditures 
of Massachusetts State College. 

President Baker reported student 
enrollment had increased from 1315 in 
1932 to 1927 in 1936. In the same 
period the teaching staff rose from 
107 to 146. 



PUCKSTERS MEET 
HUSKIES TONIGHT 



TOWN SERIES 
BEGINS HERE 



The M.S.C. basketball team will be 
seeking its first win over Amherst in 
three years when the two teams meet 
Saturday night in the Cage. This will 
be the first Frigard-coached team to 
encounter the Sabrinas. 

If comparative scores mean any- 
thing, State defeated Middlebury 36- 
31 while the Jeff men defeated Middle- 
bury 54-25 last Monday night. This 
was only Amherst's second game of the 
season, while State has won three con- 
secutive victories over Middlebury, 
M.I.T., and Williams. 

Amherst has used three complete 
teams in its first two contests. The 
first team is an all veteran combine 
which defeated State twice last year. 
It is composed of Captain Coey at 
center, Meyers and Ramey at the 
forward positions, and Schweizer and 
Holmes, guards. The second team 
includes Michell, Rider, Warner, Kee- 
sey, and Miller, while the third squad 
is an all sophomore outfit. 

State, however, has shown great 
progress and plenty of fight in its 
schedule to date. In the Williams 
contest Czelusniak scored 16 points, 
Riel 12, and Barr 8, but they will find 
plenty of opposition in Coey who 
scored 15 points against Middlebury, 
and in Meyers and Schweizer, who 
scored 12 points apiece. 



Making it three in a row, the State 
basketball men chalked up n 60-41 
win over their 1'urple opponents in 
Williamstown last Saturday evening. 
The game found the experienced State 
team in the lead throughout the con- 
test with Williams trying in vain to 
come up from l>ehind. 

High scorer for the evening was Ed 
Czelusniak who accounted for sixteen 
of the points. Fred Kiel, center, 
chalked up twelve, and Captain Lefty 
Barr, hampered by three personal 
fouls, netted four baskets and one 
foul shot. 

The Statesmen showed the towns- 
men a good brand of basketball with 
a fast breaking offense and a strong 
defensive arrangement, which frus- 
trated the Purple the entire stretch. 
Failing to take advantage of scoring 
opportunities, the Williams five trailed 
the Maroon and White, while negligent 
passing gave State the break many 
times. 

Riel opened the scoring in the first 
minute of play, and the scoring alter- 
nated beneath the two baskets until, 
with the score standing 4 to 4, Frigard's 
charges caught fire and went on the 
scoring spree which gave them the 
game. The final score, 50-41. 
The summary : 



Hicks and Caraway 
Deliver Addresses 



Uten of the physical education 
building who have wondered at the 
lack of dust and the resilence of the 
[cage 11,, <,r need wonder no longer. The 
magic, material which is at the base of 
these two qualities is the little-known 
Peat rtv >s«, in this case imported from 
Holland. Whether or not this soil 
makes our athletes Dutchmen is not 
known. 

Until ■ few years ago the colleges of 

the MMon were harassed by the prob- 

' er n ot i i tiding a suitable ground ma 

I terial for cages. Our own physical 

education department played quite an 

| import nt part in the solution of the 

Experiments and tests direc- 

urry Hicks, head of the de- 

i proved the value of peat 

a moisture-holder and soil 

' tofessor Hicks, who drew the 

esign for the building, found 

the problem in the analyses 



matter, 
ted h> 
Partm. i 
moss | 
diner, 
original 
hisclu, 



of the M ,,, U8ec i m t, ne cages of several 
Sew l land colleges and preparatory 
^hools, Kour to five percent of or- 



ganic material was found to be con- 
tained in soil from the Andover cage, 
whose floor was considered a superior 
one at that time. This led to the use 
of peat moss in our cage and the sub- 
sequent spread of uts ise throughout 
the country. 

Another substance which the de- 
partment uses in the treatment of the 
floor is calcium chloride, a soil binder 
which is also used for rural road sur- 
facing. Applications of peat moss and 
calcium chloride are made at least 
twice a year, usually oftener. No peat 
moss is used on the running track, 
which is of ordinary hard pan. Several 
years ago the turns were banked, but 
the track is still not considered a fast 
one. 

The basketball floor now in use was 
enlarged four feet last year. Its con- 
struction was originally copied from 
Wesleyan's movable floor. 

Like many other things a cage is 
built from the ground up. 



Members of the Physical Education 
department proved this week that 
their ability is not confined to teaching 
athletics. Professor Curry Hicks, head 
of the department, delivered an ad- 
dress this week at Michigan State 
College. He spoke to his fraternity, 
Kappa Phi Alpha. 



Mass. 


M.ilf 




Willi, mi-. 








1 !• 


P 




It 


K 


P 


Barr.rl 


1 1 


9 


Su.i.lley.rf 


4 


1 


9 


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2 


l-.ii vis.rf 





I 


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S-..y,lf 


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il 


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Kintj.i rf 


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a 


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Bush.rf 


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a 





Bud Klun.lg 


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Totals 


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.VI 


Totals 


1/ 


7 


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Mam, ( 


MsJdy, 





npire Winters 




I IIM.\ 


20-minute halves. 













Professor Caraway spoke on football 
last Tuesday night at a meeting of t la- 
Lions Club of Northampton. He also 
addressed the Stockbridge convocation 
Wednesday on "Agricultural Condi- 
tions in Texas." 



Opening tonight at the Boston 
Garden against Northeastern, the 
State hockey team is in for a busy 
time over the week-end taking on the 
strong Hamilton club and New Hamp- 
shire in addition to this evening's 
opponent. Rated even with the Boston 
team and a little ahead of New Hamp- 
shire, Coach Ball's charges are given 
an even chance of capturing two out 
of the three engagements and but 
little odds for a clean sweep. 

Led by Captain Johnny Bialek, 
chain-lightning wing, Northeastern 
will be a constant scoring threat 
throughout tonight's game, but the 
superior defensive play of the States- 
men should win out in the end. 

Always one of the strongest small 
college hockey teams in the country, 
Hamilton again looks too strong for 
State and should chalk up another 
win on their home ice, Saturday. 

Returning to Amherst Monday, the 
pucksters will face New Hampshire 
on the college pond in what promises 
to be the most interesting game of the 
three. Slightly favored, in view of the 
records, State will be out to make it 
three straight on the home ice. 




Coprt|Ki by rUiocuuiCtOttiiU Pmi- Mnjiion, WunmiM 



• BUCKSHOT 

6IL KUHN WAS SCX/mERN 
CALIFORNIA^ NINTH SlGrM 
CHI FOOTBALL CAPTAIN IN 
TEN YEART ! 



A. T. Wilson 



W. E. Londergan 



THE KINGSBURY PRESS 

Printers and Publishers 



Telephone 554 



Northampton, Mass. 



• Ai3^v5 CHDiw irnj 



T1IK MASSACHUSETTS CXHXJNUAN, Till KSDAY, JANUARY 14. 1937 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. JANUARY 14. 1937 



Pyramus and Thisbe Scene 
Bay State Revue Highlight 



SAMPLES OF 
OFFICIAL 
- RING ARRIVE 



"One of Funniest and Most 
Enjoyable"--Reviewer 

If William Shakespeare eould have 
bften present at the Bay State Revue 
last Saturday evening at Stockbridge 
Hall, even he would have laughed 
himself sick at the Roister Doister 
production of the famous scene of 
Pyramus and Thisbe from "A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream." 

The tragic end of Thisbe as she 
(or he) was fishing for the death- 
sword and trying to hold on to the 
skidding wig affected even the de- 
ceased Pyramus who lay on the floor 
rolling with laughter at the "death" 
of his beloved Thisbe. 

Ad Libhing 
Evidently Pyramus, even in death, 
still possessed his sense of humor; for 
as he urged Thisbe onto her end with 
the point of the sword, he was over- 
heard to remark, "If Thisbe treason, 
then make the most of it." 

The remainder of the program 
proved equally as enjoyable. The 
college orchestra inaugurated the 
Revue, followed by vocal selections 
by .James Kerr "36, who was in his 
usual fine voice. 

Then came the presentation of the 
only serious moment in the entire 
program, the dramatic skit, Rosa. The 
fine work of the tragic-stricken Italian, 
portrayed by Frank Brox *38, was the 
highlight of the play. 

Next, there appeared the erstwhile 
violin virtuoso from the sticks, Prof. 
Robert Cain '39. Meddling around 
with violin, playing it in different 
positions, behind his back, under his 
legs, etc., he drew an appreciative 
round of applause from the audience. 
At this point in the program, 
mutiny made its appearance on the 
Pilot, led by members of Phi Lambda 
Tau fraternity. Conceived and written 
by Myron Fisher '39 and Ben Hur- 
witch '38, the skit was the only original 
part of the program. What with 
Goo-goo's losing her head and the 
cook's dawncing, the comic operetta 
was well received. 

Houghton Behind a Curtain 
Kingsbury Houghton '39, protected 
by the curtain, offered impersonations 
of "Oh-oh-oh-oh Yeah!" Oswald and 
Bazooka Bob Burns, interpolated with 
gags from the Big Broadcast of 1937. 

Next appeared on the scene Eugene 
Marie Annette Yvonne Cecile Emilie 
Geiringer '38, with his "vast-uh field 
of cabbages 'n carrots swarming with 
wabbits." This skit proceded to 
wreak havoc with every one's sense 
of dignity and humor. Dressed effec- 
tively in a short skirt and "wompers," 
he proved an immediate hit. 

Continued on Page 6 






Encrusted 
Stone 



Faceted 
Stone 



Buff Top 
Stone 





The sample of the miniature, or women's size, of the official M.S.C. ring 
is to be put on display sometime today at the college store the Ring Committee 
has announced. The larger size, for men, will be delayed about a week 
from todav but a fine idea may be obtained from the sample here now. 



Pledge Formal for 
Alpha Lambda Mu 

Alpha Lambda Mu will hold its 
annual pledge formal at the Memorial 
Building after a banquet at the Hotel 
Perry on Saturday, January 16. The 
music will be furnished by Bob Miller's 
orchestra. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Fraker, 
Mrs. Edith Atkinson, and Miss Mil- 
dred Briggs will be guests. The ad- 
visers have been invited to the dance. 
ThoMe Attending 
A partial list of those attending 
include: Elizabeth Scace, Ernest 
Davis; Beatrice Davenport, George 
Davenport; Winifred Taylor, Bradley 
Frey of Orange; Edith Whitmore, 
Thomas Michaelson; Jessie Chase, 
Jasper Waite of Springfield. 

Sally Hopkins, George Pereira; 
Sandra Gulben, Dr. Robert E. Kendall 
of Cornell; Dorothy Lannon, Herbert 
Ferguson of Amherst; Lois Wood, 
Robert Smith; Eleanor West, Charles 
Whitmore of Forrestdale. 

Margaret Firth, James Jenkins; 
Emma Taft, John Ruffley; Helen 
O'Hearn, John Lav.rence; Silvia Ran- 
dall, Russel Smith; Edna Sprague, 
John Loncar of Wilbraham. 



COUNCIL CHAIRMAN 
ASKS COOPERATION 



ICLIFFORD BAYARD DISCUSSES 
PAINTINGS IN FINE ARTS TALK 



Survey of Sorority Formals Made; 
1 hree Reasons For Holding Dances 



Approximately three-fourths of the 
sorority girls have attended sorority 
formals this season, it was indicated 
today by a survey made by the social 
expert of the Collegian. Much of 
interest was gathered during the 
survey, and. the sorority formal season 
being almost over, a delineation of 
this material has been made. 

Three Keawonw for Formal** 
A canvass made of the sorority 
houses indicates that formals are held 
for various reasons, the least of these 
being that there is plenty of money 
in the house's social fund. Formals 
are held, it seems, to allow some girls 
to dance with the men they think wiU 
go out with them, to allow other girls 
to just dance, and to give others 
practice in getting dates. 

Co-eds who attended the Military 
Ball said they had little difficulty 
procuring escorts. Men attending the 
Military Ball were of the same opinion, 
except one who would not be quoted. 
The women, though, admitted that 
they were in a quandary. Because of 
the Military Ball, it was impossible 
for them to decide whether their 
sorority formal was an epilogue to the 
Military Ball or a prologue to the 
Winter Carnival Ball. Of course, the 
men hold the final judgment on this 
matter so important to certain of the 
women, and it is indicated in certain 



male quarters that independence will 
be the vogue of the Winter Carnival 
Ball with imports and changes very 
much in evidence. 

Ciirnival No Handicap 

Girls of the semi-wallflower and 
wallflower types claimed that they 
experienced a little difficulty due to 
the Winter Carnival tinge to their 
invitations, but said that the evident 
desire of M.S.C. males to be social 
lions precluded these difficulties. 

Just where this social controversy 
will end up is a matter of conjecture. 
But in the Collegian files are records 
very nearly correct of who took whom 
to what and after the Winter Carnival 
Ball another and more specific survey 
will be made to give readers the true 
status of the social muddle that exists 
at this institution. 



Alpha Lambda Mu 

The freshman pledges have organ- 
ized and chosen their officers as 
follows: president, Carolyn Monk; 
secretary and treasurer, Beryl Barton. 

Sigma Beta Chi 

The following girls from Sigma Beta 
have been chosen to model in the 
Winter Carnival: Elaine Stone, Pris- 
cilla Bradford, Lucille Monroe, Lois 
Macomber, Jessie Kinsman, and Betty 
Bates. 

The Mothers' Club of Sigma Beta 
have given them a set of dishes. 



Lambda Delta Mu 

The pledges of the sorority have 
elected the following officers: Pat 
Morse '38, chairman; Marjorie Smith 
'40, secretary; and Kay Rice '40, 
treasurer. 

Plans for an entertainment to be 
given by the pledges are under way. 

Lambda Delta Mu announces an- 
other new pledge to the sorority, 
Joan Sannella '39. 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Hair Cutting As You Like It 

By Expert Barbers 

North Dorm. M.S.C. Campus 



COLODNY'S 

32 Main St., Northampton 

Winter Sports 
Togs lead 
the line 



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Come in and see our line of sporting equipment 
SKATES $295 and $4.95 pr. 



SKIIS 
POLES 
BINDINGS 
HOCKEY STICKS 
ATHLETIC SOCKS 



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2.50 pr. 

2.98 pr. 

75c and 1.00 ea. 

25c pr. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




SKI PINS 



with 



SAFETY CLASP 

Newest thing in sport jewelry 

mm cutlers em $i»p 



In an attempt to prevent the re- 
currence of difficulties which arose 
during the first semester's fraternity 
rushing in the new rushing period 
which will end Feb. 10, Kenwood 
Ross, president of the Interfraternity 
Council, today called for an obs, rv. 
ance of gentlemen's agreements. 

"Rules," said Mr. Ross, "as hereto. 
fore set up by the Council regarding 
rushing must be considered as genife. 
men's agreements. On several ooct. 
sions such a consideration has not met 
with success. Attempts to pen;ilu«. 
infractors of rushing rules have not 
met with success for the simple 
reason that the letter of the law ha» 
not been violated. During this rush- 
ing period just ahead let us be careful 
not to violate the spirit of the law " 

Rushing rules for the second mam 
ter, announced by Mr. Ross, are a* 
follows: 

1. Open rushing shall exist from 
the close of the first semester rushing 
period in October, 1936 to Wednesday 
evening, February 10, 1937 at 6 p.m. 

2. Open rushing has been defined 
under rushing rules of the first semes- 
ter. 

3. No fraternity, or member there- 
of, shall be allowed at any time to 
invite a man to pledge his fraternity. 

4. Pledge bids will be given out on 
the evening of February 10, 1937, at 
8 p.m. at a special meeting of all 
freshmen at the Memorial Building. 

5. Pledge bids can only be awarded 
by the authorized representative of 
the Interfraternity Council at the 
special meeting of February 10, 1937. 

6. All fraternities must turn in their 
bids to the president of the Council 
by 7 p.m. on the evening of February 
10, 1937 at the regular monthly meet- 
ing of the Interfraternity Council in 
the Senate Room of the Memorial 
Building. 

7. There will be a special Chapel 
held for freshmen on the morning of 
Thursday, February 11, 1937 in 
Bowker Auditorium, Stockbridge Hall 
at 7:30 a.m. At this time, freshmen 
pledging fraternities for the second 
semester will put on their pins. 

8. Between the hours of 6 p.m., 
February 10, 1937, and 7:45 a.m., 
February 11, 1937, fraternity mem 
bers, (including alumni), and fresh 
men, (including freshmen already fra- 
ternity pledges), will not be allowed 
to communicate in any way. 

9. All freshmen not pledging at thi» 
time will not be allowed to pledge any 
fraternity until the beginning of his 
sophomore year. 

10. Infractions of these rules should 
be reported immediately to the presi 
dent of the Interfraternity Council. 



I 



issing from a personal angle 

, it ion of his paintings now on 

in Memorial Hall. Clifford 

l. famous Vermont artist, spoke 

i, -sday afternoon on the weekly 

Iji,,, is program. 

>^ r Bayard spoke of his fondness 
I f , r " r ■ landscape of southern Vermont. 
The e « » n area near Wilmington, he 
k . uf ) evhflt* the design of the country 
• different from that anywhere else. 
u 0{ \i the formation of the land, and 
trie trees of the region, maple, fir, and 
j.pru.. . make particularly fine design. 
Winter subjects are especially ex- 
cellent. 
In this connection, Mr. Bayard 
^gpokt of the influence of landscape on 
the artists mind while he is working. 
It sometimes seems, he remarked, 
that his painting gete entirely out of 
his control. 

"Mere imitation of nature is not 
art " Mr. Bayard stated at one time. 
"That is the work of a craftsman. 
Real painting is much more than 
photographic." 

In a most interesting part of his 
talk he considered many paintings 
individually, telling the history of 
their conception and discussing such 
technical matters as composition and 

color 

Toward the close of the program 
Mr. Bayard called for criticism from 
dience, and explained such fea- 
tures of the paintings as came in for 
questioning. 



Hardware 

35 Pleasant Street 



Electrical Supplies 

Amherst, Mass. 



We stock the finest Ski Clothing 
in this part of the country. 

Ski Suits Parkas Sweaters 

Ski Boots (official model) 

Outfits for Men and Women 



Always an Enjoyable 
Treat at 

SRANDCNICC'S 
RESTAURANT 

Just below the Town Hall 

The finest in quality 
Foods and Beverages 

Dine, Wine and Dance 



MEET AT 



BARSELOnrS CAR 

BALLANTINE'S ALE 

HAMPDEN CREAM ALE 

Every Visit A Pleasant Memory 



HYGEONIC DRY CLEANING 

Men's Suits 75c Plain Dresses 75c 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



THE NATIONAL SHOE REPAIR CO 

3 Main St. Next to Tewn Hall 

Try our high-classed work 

Popular Prices Work Guaranteed 



Ski Parkas Navy or White Special values at $5.00 

Ski Mittens Waterproof back Buckskin palm $2.00 
Ski Sox 65c to $1.00 
Sale prices on Suits, Overcoats, Shirts. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON. 

Cloth** for College Men for forty -five y*ar* 



College Candy Kitchen 



CANDY 

Select out of our lines 

PAGE & SHAW KEMP CYNTHIA SWEETS 



Newmans to Hold 
Breakfast Sunday 

The Newman Club will hold a 
communion breakfast after the nine 
o'clock mass Sunday, January 17, 
David P. Rossi ter '37, president of 
the organization, announced today. 

Tickets may be obtained from David 
Rossiter '37, Helena C. McMahon '37, 
Mary P. O'Connell '38, and Charles 
E. Eshbach '37. 



TEXTILE EXHIBITION 
SHOWS NEW TREND 
IN COLOR HARMONY 

The exhibition of textiles which is 
now on display in Wilder Hall, and 
which will be up for inspection until 
January 12, is one that will appeal to 
all art lovers, and those especially 
who are interested in clothing or 
interior decoration. 

This exhibition is of modern textiles 
created by the Bureau of Style and 
Design of Marshall Field & Company, 
manufacturing division; these textiles 
are new, not only in color and design, 
but also in weaving. 



iKitchen Sees Need 
of Faith in World 

There is a great need in the world 

[for a common integrating faith, stated 

J\V. .1 Kitchen in his address on the 

(•'Student Christian Movement" at the 

fagpers service. 

Results 
This lack of consciousness of 
bentral value in life," he said, "has 
frequently led to futility; and hu- 
nanity has been driven to seek some 
Barter around which to unite. The 
mergence of powerful secular philoso- 
phies such as Communism and Fascism 
an particular, and the more general 
nati rialistic, secular view of life 
NDNsent efforts to find some point of 
loyalty in life." 

The Student Christian Movement, 
I ained, is a fellowship of protes- 

lant students who desire to understand 
traditional Christianity. Its hope 
lies in a united movement of all 
I nits to reestablish the princi- 

ita of Christianity. 

<ki;iIs for This Year 

Every year the Student Christian 

Movement directs its efforts towards 

lefinite goals. This year it is inter- 

Mtd in: education for peace; a 

•]( to understand the processes 

n today; the possibility of the 

Btudcr Christian Movement becom- 

|nii | world instrument for embodying 

f these principles. 



HEATSF 



Shows Daily 2:30 6:30 8:30 



FRI.-SAT. 

the laugh hit of the year! 

I" 3 MEN ON 
A HORSE'" 

with Frank McHugh 

Joan Blondell Allen Jenkins 

— also — 

Robert Armstrong in 

"WITHOUT ORDERS" 

Plus: Poodles Haneford Circus 
Technicolor Cartoon 



SIN.-MON.- TIF.S. 

The fastest collection of smash 

song, gorgeous girls and goofy 

gags you've ever seen! 

"COLLEGE 
HOLIDAY"' 

with Jack Benny 

Burns and Allen Mary Boland 
Martha Raye and others 
— and look\ 
Pete Smith Sports 
Popeye Pathe News 



DRAWING MATERIAL 

Board* T Square Triangles Pencils Erasers 

Slide Rules Compasses Protractors 

A.J.Hastings ""ESSST 17 So. Pleasant St. 



ANYWAY, HE GOT IT BACK 

The notice in last week's Collegian 
about a ring having been found by 
the (Irounds Department has cre- 
ated a problem on the campus. 

When the ring was claimed by 
its owner soon after the notice 
appeared, the Grounds Depart 
ment saw the matter ;is proof of its 
honesty and efficiency, the Collegian 
saw it as proof of its effectiveness 
as an advertising medium, and 
both doubt that there is enough 
credit in the whole affair to go 
around. 

The owner was Dana H. Malins 
'40. The recovered ring is valued 
at $35. 



OUTLOOK OF ORGANIZED LABOR 
IS SUBJECT OF ROBERT WATT 



Next Semester's 
Speakers Named 

Dr. William P. Ryan of Holyoke, 
commander of the Department of the 
Massachusetts American Legion, is to 
be the speaker in convocation on 
January 21. 

Following is the list of speakers for 
the convocations in the second semes- 
ter. 
Feb. 11. Opening Convocation — Pres. 

Hugh P. Baker. 
Feb. 18. Interfraternity Council-Dr. 

W. Elmer Ekblaw, Professor of 

Geography, Clark University. 
Feb. 25. Concert by College Band. 
March 4. Wilfred Husband —"Toward 

A New Far Eastern Policy." 
March 11. Munroe Smith, National 

Director, American Youth Hostels. 
March 18. President A. N. Jorgensen, 

Connecticut State College. 
March 25. Flavel Shurtleff, Counsel, 

American Planning and Civic Assn. 
April 8. John H. Baker, executive 

director, National Association of 

Audubon Societies. 
April 15. Prof. Erwin H. Schell, head 

of department of Business and En- 
gineering Administration, M.I.T. 
April 22. Inspector W. H. Draine 



Tree Removals For 
Orchard Betterment 

The appearani e of the college 
orchard on I'rexy's Hill has been 
changed recently by the removal of a 
number of trees. The pomology de- 
partment has cut down an entire 
section of the orchard to make way 
for further planting. 

The policy of cutting trees is in no 
way injurious to the purpose for which 
the trees were planted, Professor Van 
Meter of the department said. Only 
the trees that are not needed are l>eing 
removed. He pointed out that the 
college does not grow apples for the 
market. The trees are for experiment- 
al purposes only. 

D00LEY ARRIVES 
2 MINUTES LATE 
FOR CONVOCATION 



Two minutes after Dean William 
L. Machmer dismissed convocation 
at quarter past eleven last Thursday, 
assuming that the speaker would be 
unable to reach Amherst over the icy 
roads, Thomas P. Dooley '13 arrived 
at the college to discuss "The Re- 
lationship of Vocational Work in 
Secondary Schools to College." Ex- 
cerpts from the talk were printed in 
last week's Collegian. 

Lester, Bureau of Investigation, 

Washington, D. C. 
April 29. Phi Kappa Phi Convocation. 
May 6. Insignia Con vocation. 
May 13. Burnham Declamation. 
May 20. Trustee Convocation. 
May 27. Senior Convocation. 



Unemployment Insurance by the 

stale administration is "a colossal 
absurdity" according to Hubert J. 
Watt, secretary <>l tin- Massachuset t.s 
Federation of Labor, who spoke at 

convocation this morning. His topic 
was "Organized Labor*! Outlook in 
the Nation and State." 

He continued to sav thai it is a 
"monument of waste, of conflicting 
jurisdictions, and of inefficient opera- 
tion." He himself is a member of the 
Massachusetts Unemployment Com- 
pensation Commission which adminis- 
ters the state law. He advocated one 
Federal system instead of forty-nine 
separate plans. He also stated that he 
has "no patience with any insurance 
system which spends three quartt'iw 
of its energy in finding ways to limit 
its own usefulness." 

"Logic will again be ignored by the 
many representatives and senators 
who heed the whispered warnings of 
the hidden lobbyist for intrenched 
privilege," he predicted for the struggle 
over issues on Beacon Hill this winter. 
Mr. Watt doubts if any voter deserves 
"any higher standard of behavior 
from an elected official than the voter 
himself practices," and he questions 
whether "the people who pride them- 
selves on 'fixing' a parking tag are 
honest enough to recognize that their 
little privileges are petty pickings 
from the trough of graft." 

"I think that our law is bad even 
if I was one of the small group which 
drafted it," the speaker added. He 
said that some of the amendments 
which were added to the law at the 
time of its enforcement two or three 
years ago were undoubtedly forced 
upon the drafter "in an effort to 
make us so disgusted that we would 
kill the whole program." 



PREPARE FOR MID YEARS 

Outlines and Kcvirw Rooks. We have n larfte stock. 

American and English Literature, History, Economics, Forestry, 
Natural Resources, Shakespeare, Sciences, Languages. Psychology 

Sociology, Education, Government. 

Verb Wheels 35c (French, German and Spanish) 

JAMES A. LOWELL, Bookseller 



SUM kit It MM, K 

Continued from Page 2 
to enter a basketball team in the 
intra-mural competition. Outside 
games with the Amherst Boys Club, 
McCarthy's Business School have also 
been arranged. 

The third and final degree of initia- 
tion will be conferred on pledges of 
the house at the next regular meeting. 
All members are requested to be 
present. 
llort Chin Meeting 

All students interested in gardening 
are invited to attend the meeting of 
the Hort Club, Thursday evening at 
7.:50 in Wilder Hall. 



HAL KEMP 



M. S. C. MEN'S MOTTO IS ALWAYS 
"LET DAVE DO IT" 

Amherst Cleaners and Dyers 

Only dry cleaning plant in town. 
Work called for and delivered Telephone 828 




KAY THOMPSON 



HAL KEMP'S ORCHESTRA 
FEATURING KAY THOMPSON AND 

THE RHYTHM SINGERS "* 
EVERY FRIDAY 8 30 P • M., E. S. T. 

ALL COLUMBIA STATIONS 




EDDIE M. SWITZER 



Clothing and Haberdashery 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



THOMAS F. WALSH 



College Outfitter 



HICKEY-FKEEMAN SUITS 

Is it not better to share distinction with the well-dressed minority 

who wear Hickey-Freeman suits rather than follow the 

majority carrying the stamp of mass production. 



BAY STATE REVUE 

Continued from Page 4 

Cheater Chmura '38 presented in- 
terpretive dances, first the Malaguena 
and then the Dance of Death. The 
latter was particularly appreciated by 
the audience. 

James Lee '38, guitarist, taking his 
place in the spotlight, offered well- 
played solos on the guitar. His ren- 
dition of Two Guitars was very well 
done. 

Shakespeare the Highlight 
And then the never-to-be-forgotten 
scene from Shakespeare's "Midsum- 
mer Night's Dream." With Larry 
Levinson '38 and Bill Graham '38 
playing the leading roles of Pyramus, 
the great lover, and Thisbe, the sweet, 
demure maiden, respectively, the pres- 
entation was a howling success from 
the very start. The expressions on the 
actors' faces, the animate crevice in 
the wall, and the ad-libbing of the 
actors themselves brought gales of 
laughter from the audience. 

Eccentric dancing by Lane Giddings 
'38 and selections by the college band 



drew to an auspicious close one of the 
funniest and most enjoyable Revues 
ever staged at Massachusetts State 
College. 

The skits and the eccentric musical 
solos kept the audience in a constant 
frenzy, and the audience left the hall 
in a state of exhaustion brought on by 
the hilarity with which it had greeted 
the efforts of the actors. 

— N. E. L. 



ROSS' STATISTICS 

Continued from Page 1 

No one would question the cold 
logic of the student who sat himself 
down in the presence of a hamburger, 
examined it critically, and remarked 
to himself: "Hell, them proteins 
ain't any good. They're deadl" But 
whether or not the average student is 
a connoiseur of dead proteins, the fact 
remains that his annual lunch cart 
and restaurant expenditures total 
$15.25. This sum is almost evenly 
divided among Sams' Candy Kitchen, 
Deady's Diner, and points West. Ap- 



parently our student is a cosmopolite 
who can, with the same reckless 
abandon, slup up a soda, mangle a 
hamburger, or guzzle a beer. 

No White-Collar Student* 

Judging from the looks of his 
laundry expenditures, the typical stud- 
ent is by no stretch of the imagination 
a white-collar man. If he appears to 
you to be bow-legged, do not be 
hasty of judgment. It may be that 
his trousers need pressing. Still, with 
a laundry and tailor bill of only $7.00 
a year, Joe College nevertheless ap- 
pears to retain an attractive and 
engaging personality. Dave and the 
Amherst Laundry rate equally with 
him. 

Surprising as it may seem, the 
average student spends only $4.00 per 
year in drug stores, half of which is 
left at Wellworth's. 

There is the composite picture of 
the average M.S.C. student, a callow 
youth of diverse desires. On campus 
he is merely an everyday occurence, 
but at home he is a mother's pride, a 
father's joy. 



JESUS SANROMA 

Continued from Page 1 

Native of Puerto Rico 

Mr. Sanroma is a native of Puerto 
Rico and has made a study of the 
native music of the Puerto Ricans. 
Arriving in the United States in 1917, 
he has been active in musical circles 
in Boston. In 1926 he was chosen 
official pianist of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

His concert in Amherst will have as 
a special feature the variations of 
"Mary Had A Little Lamb." Mr. 
Sanroma's rendition will demonstrate 
musical parody at its best. 



Nature Broadcast* 

Mr. Pray stated that a Weekly] 
series of nature broadcasts is Leirt| | 
prepared and will go on the air s^me. 
time later. 



WINTER CARNIVAL 

Continued from Page 1 
intercollegiate ski meet, which carnival 
attendants may attend with transpo r .| 
tation furnished. 

Students planning to have off-cam. I 
pus visitors for the carnival are urged 
to take cognizance of the announce. 
ment of transportation appearing else- 1 
where in the columns of the CoU,^i an 



RADIO BROADCASTS 

Continued from Page 1 
Mr. Schauffler, a student at Amherst 
college, won first place in the second 
and third class races on both the 
Thunderbolt and Mt. Wachusetts 
trail. The program will also include 
the first lesson in the ski school con- 
ducted by Lawrence E. Briggs and 
side remarks by "Christy Tempo." 



FROSH STATISTICS 

Continued from Page 1 
percentile, are superior to 72 % of the I 
freshmen of all the other colleges I 
which gave the exams. They arel 
equal in intelligence to 1% and inferior I 
to 21 % 

Dr. H. N. Glick made the statement 
that M.S.C. freshmen are equal to 
the best fifty percent of the freshmen | 
in the country. 




Aromatic tobaccos from the districts 
of Xanthi, Cavalla, Smyrna and Sam- 
soun in Turkey and Greece, the to- 
baccos of richest aroma 



. blended with 

Mild ripe home-grown tobaccos — 
Bright tobacco from the Carolinas, 
Georgia and Virginia; Burley tobacco 
from Kentucky and Tennessee; and 
tobacco from southern Maryland 

. . . and rolled in 



Champagne Cigarette paper of the 
finest quality. This paper, specially 
made for Chesterfield cigarettes, is 
pure and burns without taste or odor. 



z^h^u CJUste^HexMS 



PRINCE 
BROADCAST 

MONDAY 




U. A. C. Library. 



Mpn 



THETA CHI 

WINS 
INSPECTION 



. 



fol. *> V " 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1937 



No. 15 



937 Index 
Is Dedicated 
To Machmer 

dedication to be Written 
by Marshall Lanphear; 
Dean has been at M.S.C. 
Since 1911 

The 1937 number of the Index, 
State College year book, will be dedi- 
cated to Dean William L. Machmer, 
|t was announced here yesterday. The 
Jedication will be written by Assistant 
)ean Marshall O. Lanphear, to whom 
Ihe 19i r > Index was dedicated. This 
narks the first issue of the year book 
[o be dedicated to Dean Machmer. 
Came in 1911 

The Dean, at present acting head of 
[he mathematics department, has been 
Actively associated with M.S.C. since 
[911. Upon receiving his A.B. degree 
U Franklin and Marshall College in 
1907, he headed the mathematics de- 
partment at Franklin and Marshall 
jtaademy until 1911 when he took his 

.M. degree at the Lancaster, Pa., in- 
kiitution. The same year he came to 
Rtair .i* an instructor in mathematics. 

In 1913 he was appointed assistant 
professor in mathematics, holding that 
bosit ion until 1918 when he was made 

federal demonstration agent in market- 

tg, returning here in 1919 as a pro- 
lessor of mathematics. The following 
tear he was named assistant Dean, 
►nd shortly after that acting Dean. 
I>ean Since 192K 
In 1924 he was acting Registrar of 
Ihe college, and in 1926 he was ap- 
pointed Dean. He is a member of 

Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi 
Continued on Page 2 



START NEW SERIES 
OF FRENCH MOVIES 



PLAYS AT BALL 




Dean Holmes Not Told of Survey; 
Action Awaits Return of Hurley 



HENRY BIAGINI 



LINDSTR0M, 
FLOWER TO 
HEAD STAFF 



Beginning Monday, February 15 at 
1.30 p.m., a series of at least five 
french movies will be shown at the 
unbent theater, sponsored by the 
French departments of Mass. State 
^nd Amherst Colleges. 

Titles 

Four of the movies have already 

in chosen; they are: Liliom, fea- 

Jrinn Charles Boyer, Cessez le Feu or 

1 'ilte des Rapaces with the 

tfebrated French actor Jean Galland, 

1I1' M. Poirier, and the 

^rilli.ini - ,1 ire. Knock, ou le Triomphe 

la A/> Heine, the fifth, it is hoped, 

'ill be / 11 Kernesse Heroique, which 

rtfll running in Broadway, and was 

Ecently 'warded a prize for the best 

Jm in anj language in 1936. 

As in previow years, admission is 

Continued on Page 6 



decision in Symbol 
Contest Is Delayed 

the contest for the selection of an 

"al and standard college symbol 

de d Friday, January 15, and the 

Wn ,,r, i n tne hands of the judges. 

e winning proposal will be selected 

■ l " r '" 1 ' is Pray, James Robertson, 

1,(1 lr t I rank P. Rand. Because of 

>nclis],.,.,tj on of one of the judges, 

nal dt 1 >M 0n has not yet been made. 

-'on of the judges will be 

a cleverness of the idea 

on the skdl with which 

1 symbol is drawn. 



Excuse Classes 
On Saturday of 
Carnival Week 



All classes will be excused on Satur- 
day, February 13, and carnival com- 
petitors may be excused from classes 
the afternoon of February 12, Philip 
Layton, chairman of the Winter 
Carnival committee announced today. 

An innovation in decorations will 
be in store for those attending the 
winter carnival ball, John Glick, chair- 
man of the ball committee, announced 
recently. The services of Louis Tisdale 
of Leominster and his crystal shower 
have been secured to provide a back- 
ground for the music of Hiagini. 

The crystal shower, a reflecting 
apparatus utilizing over 9000 mirrors 
to throw the rays of multicolored 
lights about the hall, is the same 
apparatus that has appeared at the 
Dartmouth winter carnival ball and 
at several other New England insti- 
tutions. Besides Mr. Tisdale a staff 
of five electricians will be required to 
operate the crystal shower. 

Chaperoning the ball February 12 
will be Major and Mrs. Leo B. Conner 
and Dr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Radcliffe. 

Other winter carnival developments 
include the presentation of a fashion 
show by the Ann August Shop. 



At the annual election meeting of 
the editorial board of the Collegian 
last Monday, Frederick B. Lindstrom 
'38 and Stanley A. Flower '38 were 
elected to the positions of editor-in- 
chief and managing editor, respective- 
ly, and Julian H. Katzeff '38 was 
appointed to the position of associate 
editor. 

Other appointments were Maurice 
Tonkin '38 to the campus editorship 
and Alfred M. Swiren '38 to the sports 
editorship. 

Take Over February 11 

The new editorial board will take 
over its duties beginning with the next 
issue of the Collegian on February 11. 
That issue will mark the retirement 
of the following senior members: 
Louis A. Breault, Jr., editor-in-chief; 
Walter G. Guralnick, associate editor; 
Philip B. Shift", campus editor; Ray- 
mond B. Jordan, make-up editor; 
Continued on Page 6 



Farwell '28, Prince 
On Radio Programs 

Theodore A. Farwell of Greenfield, 
an alumnus of M.S.C. in the class of 
1927, will be the guest speaker on the 
third in the series of Winter Sports 
programs to be broadcast from station 
WSPR in Springfield this afternoon 
at 5 p.m. The second lesson of the ski 
school being conducted by Larry 
Briggs will be featured on today's 
program. Master of ceremonies will 
be Christie Tempo. 

The second in the series of Liberal 
Arts programs which opened last 
Monday will be broadcast over the 
same station next Monday at 2:30 p.m. 
Professor Walter K. Prince will be 
Continued on Page 6 



HOLMES NOT INFOKMIl) 

In an exchange of telegrams with 
Dean Henry W. Holmes by the 
Collegian late Tuesday in an effort 
to determine the status of Governor 
Hurley's proposed survey of the 
college, Dean Holmes of the Har- 
vard Graduate School of Education 
stated that he knew nothing about 
the proposed survey. 

His reply to a Collegian query 
was as follows: 

"I have had no official coin* 
in unical ion whatever and know 
nothing about the investiga- 
tion except what has been re- 
ported in newspapers. 

Henry W. Holme*." 



State Auditor Reports That 
Only A few Bookkeeping 
Errors Found in College 
Accounts. 



Theta Chi Wins 
First Semester 
House Inspection 

Theta Chi was awarded first place 
in the first semester fraternity house 
inspection made Tuesday night by a 
committee of judges comprising Mrs. 
Coolidge, Prof. Frank C. Moore, and 
Prof. Orton Clark. Second place went 
to lambda Chi Alpha while Kappa 
Sigma finished third. 

Inside Stressed 

This was the first of two house 
inspections which will be held this 
year. It stressed inside appearance 
and orderliness; while the other in- 
spection, which will be held in May, 
will emphasize outside conditions. 

First place in last year's inspection 
went to Lambda Chi Alpha, with 
Theta Chi, Kappa Sigma, and Kappa 
Epsilon taking second, third, and 
fourth places, respectively. 

Part of Competition 

House inspections are grouped with 
such things as the snow sculpture 
competition, the interfraternity sing, 
and other academic activities in the 
winning of points towards the cup. 



All was quiet on the Western 
Massachusetts front last night as the 
second investigation within a year 
into the finances of the college by a 
governor of the Commonwealth halted 
almost as suddenly as it began. 
Holme* Not Told 

With the announcement by Henry 
W. Holmes of Harvard Graduate 
School of Education in a telegram to 
the Collegian that he knew nothing 
about his proposed survey of the 
college and the report by the state 
auditor that only a few bookkeeping 
errors were found in college accounts, 
it seemed unlikely that the investi- 
gation would be pushed any further. 

Governor Hurley, who proposed the 
survey, left for Washington on Tues- 
day, January 19, to attend the in- 
auguration, without having indicated 
whether or not he would drop the 
proposed investigation. The first news 
of the proposed investigation came at 
what was expected to be a routine 
organization meeting of the board of 
trustees on Wednesday morning, Jan. 
13. During the meeting, Governor 
Hurley, as president ex-officio of the 
board of trustees, began a rapid fire 
questioning of Dr. Baker. Some of 
the questions asked were as follows: 
Dialogue 
"What I am interested in is the 
number of students enrolled and the 
number of teachers employed with a 
Continued on Page 4 



INFIRMARY CASES 
AVERAGE 15 DAILY 



Jesus Sanroma Delights Capacity Audience with Catchy 
Burlesque of Adventures of Mary and Her Little Lamb 



With amazing dexterity and with ■ nique and the dexterity of his supple 
catchy burlesque of "Mary Had A fingers. 

Little Lamb," Jesus Maria Sanroma, ; After the concert, the members of 
pianist, delighted a capacity audience j the feminine sex predominated the 



at the Community Concert in Bowker 
Auditorium on Tuesday evening. 

The listeners were highly pleased 



crowd back-stage seeking autographs. 
Mr. Sanroma discovered an old child- 
hood friend in the presence of the 



with the "irreverent" disclosures of wife of one of the members of the 



■ted ,,, 
Kb* .1 

he su gK , 



the adventures of Mary's little lamb 

as depicted by Sanroma at the piano 

in the style of ten different composers. 

S<- 1 1 xi- of Humor 

Ranging from the delicacy of De- 
bussy to the majesty and ponderous- 
ness of Wagner, Mr. Sanroma demon- 
strated a prominent sense of humor and 
ability to please an audience. His 
encores of the "Cat and the Mouse," 
relating the hunt of a mouse by a re- 
lentless cat, and "The Hurdy-gurdy," 
imitated on the piano, pleased the 
listeners very much, particularly the 
younger ones. 

The remainder of the variable pro- 
gram offered the pianist many oppor- 
tunities to reveal his admirable tech- 



faculty of Massachusetts State College 

whom he had known in Puerto Rico. 

A Comic 

A comical situation was created 
when the pianist, in autographing 
programs, sadly remarked that a 
proferred autograph book was not a 
check book as it had appeared. 

As the younger girls left the room, 
fleeing before the presence of time, 
and the older people began to enter, 
Mr. Sanroma stated with a grin that 
the "girls must be growing up." 

Queried as to his education in the 
United States, Mr. Sanroma replied 
that he had come to this country in 
1917 and had enrolled as a special 
student in Huntington Preparatory 



School in Boston. I^ater he had 
alligned himself with the Boston Con- 
servatory of Music and was still con- 
nected with this institution. 

He was astonished and pleased to 
hear the information that a son of his 
former teacher of English at Hunting- 
ton was now a student at M.S.C. 

He Declines 

As he continued to sign programs, 
he remarked with pseudo-sadness that 
no recognition had been made of the 
fact that he himself had authored the 
annotations of the selections on the 
program. "I'm not going to write any 
more annotations," he declared with a 
twinkle in his eyes. 

Then, bidding everyone fareweU 
and thanking everyone for the co- 
operation and friendliness which he 
had found in Amherst, he put on his 



While other regions may be suffering 
large numbers of hospital cases, the 
college infirmary is handling only a 
slightly greater than normal January 
run of illness. 

There has been an average daily 
load of about fifteen cases, Dr. Rad- 
cliffe reported. Four or five cases 
enter each day while the same number 
leave. Despite any rumors to the 
contrary, there have been, to date, no 
serious contagious diseases. Most 
cases are either severe colds or mild 
grippe. 

The health service recommends that 
all students pay particular attention 
to hygienic methods of living during 
this period and advises that adequate 
rest is an excellent preventive. 



No Cut to Be Made 
In N.Y.A. on Campus 

The dismissal of twenty student 
N.Y.A. workers who were recently 
cut from the grounds department 
force was in no way connected to the 
national W.P.A. reductions, and in 
no way repudiates the previous state- 
ment by the placement service that 
N.Y.A. funds at this college would 
not be cut this year, according to 
Mr. Hannum of the Placement office. 
The students in question were 
hat and coat and left the hall for his ! hired temporarily through funds which 
return to Boston where he has the accumulated from unfilled work quotas, 
position of pianist with the Boston Their dismissal only indicates that 
Symphony Orchestra. ' the extra funds have run out. 



Coprr»«ht 19J7. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1937 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. JANUARY 21. 1937 



:» 




Collegian 



/Ibaeeacbii^ 

Official n^pape^o f the M»Machusett. State Colle«r. Published every Thursday by the stu dents. 

LOUIS A. BREAULT '37, Editor-in-chief 
FREDERICK LINDSTROM 38. Managing Editor WALTER GURALNICK '37. Associate Editor 



Campus 

PHILIP B. SHIFF '37, Editor 
RICHARD C. DESMOND 37 
JAMES S. WALDMAN '37 
STANLEY A. FLOWER 38 
MAURICE TONKIN "38 
THOMAS J ENRIGHT 39 
MARY T. MEEHAN '39 
EMERY MOORE '39 
ELEANOR WARD 39 
MABELLE BOOTH '39 
BETTINA HALL '39 
JOSEPH BARTOSIEWICZ 40 
FRANKLIN M. DAVIS '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART 40 
SUSAN E. STUTSMAN 40. Secretary 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Athletics 




CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Editor 
•38 



JULIAN H. KATZEFF 38. 
MAXWELL I. KLAYMAN 
ALFRED M. SWIREN '38 
JOHN E. FILIOS '40 
ARTHUR A. NOYES '40 

Make-up 
RAYMOND B. JORDAN '37, Editor 
DOROTHY MERRILL '40 

Stockbridfte Correspondents 
GEORGE TROWBRIDGE S'37 
WESLEY NUTTER S'38 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS BOARD 

KENWOOD ROSS '37. Business Manager 
Business Assistants 
SYMANCYK '37. Advertising Mgr. HARRY F. KOCH 

WILLIAM B. FERGUSON '38, Subscription Mgr. 
WILLIAM B. GRAHAM '38 WILLIAM H. HARRISON '38 

MITCHELL F. NEJAME '38 
ABRAHAM CARP 
ALLEN GOVE '39 



Another week, another column 
>vith a dtml personality, one for 
yon mid one for the waste basket. 
Still no sijin of our columner 
eruteh — the missing joke hook, 
however. The only thinjj that has 
turned tip is a pair of ladies' silk 
hosiery short in the hoof and 
long i" the shank. That, dear 
reader (we always like to think 
that at least ONE person reads 
this drivel), turned onr thoughts 
into other channels — 

"Cherehe* la femme." 



Thursday, Jan. 21 

7.30 p.m. Band, Memorial Building 
8:00 p.m. Women's Glee Club, at 
Stockbridge 
Friday, Jan. 22 

7:30 p.m. Social Dancing Class, 

Drill Hall 
8:00 p.m. Dance given by Stock- 
bridge freshmen, Memorial Hall 
Saturday, Jan. 23 

Hockey, Middlebury, there 
8:00 p.m. Basketball, B.U., here 
Sunday, Jan. 24 

5:00 p.m. Vespers, Memorial Hall, 
Pres. Hugh Baker, M.S.C. 
Monday, Jan. 25 

8:00 a.m. Final exams start 
Monday, Feb. 8 

8:00 a.m. Second semester starts 



Stockbridqe 



WESLEYAN WINS IN SECOND HALF 53-36 



Freshman Reception 

The annual Freshman 



Rec» 



•tion 



CLIFFORD E. 



37. Circulation Mgr. 



'39 



DONALD L. SILVERMAN '38 
CHARLES RODDA 39 
HENRY WINN 39 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR. SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



Make all order* payable to The Massachusetts 
Collegian. In case of change of address, subsenber 
will please notify the business manager as soon as 
possible. Alumni, undergraduate and (acuity con- 
tributions are sincerely encouraged. Any communi- 
cations or notices must be received at the Collegia* 
office before 9 o'cl ock. Monday evening. Phone 13^-W 

entered as second-class matter at the Amherst Post 
Office Accepted for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in Section 1103. Act of October 1917. 
authorized August 20. 1918. 

Printed by The Kingsbury Press. 82 North Street. 
Northampton, Mass. Telephone 65* 



1936 Member 1937 

Plssociated GoUe6icfe Press 

Distributors of 

Golle6ide Di6est 

mmmmmm ro* nationau adv««tibino »y 
National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Collet* Publishers Kefretemtativt 

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CM.COO - BOSTON - SAN FSANCISCO 

LOS ANOELSS - PORTLAND . SEATTLE 



With finals just around the cor- 
ner we've been gnashing our 
pearly white tooth trying to figure 
out how best to utilize the reading 
period that fills the gap between 
cessation of regular classes and 
beginning of finals. All we have 
to do is decide what to use Sunday 
for. 



Announcements 



EDITCRIAl- 



fTJJH WRRANTED, UNWARRANTED 

Unwarranted and we hope unintentional was a threat made 

the carnival ball are not run to make money. It s like cutting tne 

two'Se^for reasons the, did act m. e £, ta wen^so 
&rt&A^^<2£ta *• air and outwardly nta 

« wa rP of the situation which is operating to bring about a boy- 
cott of th i affair The spiteful ones cannot get the committee in 
wrong But what a job they can do to their reputf ons! 

A small college should be like a happy family. This one is 
like ^family ail I right- except that too many of the children are 
very, very young. 

WHAT THE HELL 

A while ago we thought Joe College had gownup^ JomMh 

hood and had assumed an air of dignity befitting his station in 
Kfc Rut we notke Sat most of the fraternities are again planning 
\?Jb$!^&$^ to that annual bit of foolishness known 

about the values of the fraternity. 



Probably the most embarrassed student 
on campus was the one who, answering 
a knock on his fraternity house door, 
cordially greeted a person carrying a 
black satchel whom he took to be a 
travelling salesman, and invited him in 
to display his wares. The "travelling 
salesman" turned out to be the Com- 
munity Concert artist of the evening, 
pianist Jesus Maria Sanroma. 

WE HAVE OITt HOME-MAKERS, 
TOO 

AmherHt Student, please copy. 
Our exchange copy of the Wheaton 
News contained an extra piece of 
mail in its fold* today— a third- 
class advertisement informing 
student W. Wham that "his 
subscription to the Redbook mag- 
azine expires with the very next 
issue, so he will want to send his 
renewal at once, we're sure, in 
order that his subscription may 
be continued without interrup- 
tion." 

Now at last we can hold up our 
head and continue reading Roys' 
Life and the Ladies Home Journal 
where •*• left oil. 



Senior Class Meeting 

All seniors who expect to graduate 
in June are asked to attend a class 
meeting immediately after convoca- 
tion on February 11. Plans for the 
various activities connected with com- 
mencement will be discussed. 



NEXT ISSUE, FER. 11 

This is the last regular issue of 
the Collegian for the first semester. 
Publication will be resumed on the 
first Thursday, Feb. 11, of the 
second semester. 



will be held at the Memorial Bui di nz 
on Friday, January 22 at 7.30 p. m 
The usual dance will be supplem- nted 
with bridge, bowling, billiards. | )(X! | 
and table tennis. The progran h* 
been arranged by Ralph Hietmn 
his committee. All students of Stock 
bridge and their guests are invitt t 



I^ose in Hockey and Hasketbull 

The Blue and White's athletic] 
teams failed to come up to their] 
usual standards in the past week. Th, 
basketeers losing two games and the | 
pucksters one. 

Beaten decisively in their gamel 
with Suffield Academy, Wednesday 
the quintet played much better basket- 
ball only to lose a close one to Williston 
on Saturday. 

Their next scheduled game Ls with | 
Vermont Academy at the cage Satui- 
day, January 23. 

The hockey team playing on » 
slushy, wash-boardy surface, lost their 
game to Williston by a one goai | 
margin. The team showed up well. 
however, as it was their second time 
on ice this season. The first line, made I 
up of the veterans, Norberg, Baldwin 
and Merino were best for Stockbridge, 

Intramural basketball competition! 
promises to be keen this year with 
ten teams entered in the league. The 
first round gets underway with six I 
games scheduled for this week. 



Exam Schedules 

Extra copies of the December 17 
issue of the Collegian which contains 
the first semester examination sched- 
ule may be obtained without charge 
after three o'clock today at the 
Collegian office. There is a limited 
number of copies available. 



THOUGHTS ON RETIRING 

We've lived on borrowed time, 'tis said, 
And we admit it sad but true — 
If time has passed on wings of lead 
Sincere condolences to you. 

But as for us— Reinaerd and I 
We've had our fling, our fun, our try 
To make of cares a happier mold 
To leave some warmth where there 

was cold. 
We've hurt some feelings- we don't 

doubt — 
By jokes put in or jokes left out; 
But now we ask you — please forgive— 
'Look up, and love, and laugh, and 

live.' 

Our time's nigh up; the sinking fire 
Voices one thought time to retire 
Part then we must, in the soft after- 
glow; 
Reinaerd, you'll stay— but I must go. 



Carnival Transportation 

Reservations for Boston-Amherst 
bus tickets are requested to be made 
with Ben Hurwitch at Phi Lambda 
Tau as soon as possible so that definite 
arrangements with the bus company 
may be completed. The round trip 
will not cost more than $3.50, and the 
price will be less if a large number of 
reservations are made. 

Freshman Dance 

There will be a "vie" party in 
Thatcher Hall Friday night from 8-11. 
Raker at Vespers 

Dr. Hugh P. Baker, the President 
of the College, will speak on the sub- 
ject, "Seeing Life Through" at the 
Vespers Service this Sunday which is 
to be held in the Memorial Building 
at 5 p.m. 

Fine Arts Concert 

As the last program of the semester, 
the Fine Arts Council will present Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Stratton in a concert 
of two pianos on Tuesday, January 
26, at 4:30 in Memorial Hall. 



Poultry Club 

The Massachusetts State College l 
Poultry Club met for the first time 
this year last Friday evening. The 
meeting was in the form of a party 
and Prof. Banta and John Vonddl 
were in charge of the entertainment. 
Refreshments were served under the | 
supervision of wives of the faculty. 

At a brief meeting Fred Dickens I 
S'38 was elected president, John 
Brooks S'37 secretary-treasurer, and 
George Trowbridge S'37 member of 
the executive board. An interesting 
series of programs is being arranged 
and will be announced soon. 



Ipickmen drop game 
to n.u. skaters 4-2 



Hon't cry little fellow, some 
glutton for punishment will pick 
up your k — d — column. 



THE EDITOR LEAVES 

This is the last issue of the Collegian under the present ad- 

fecultv « g nd alumni who have read the paper have been appreci- 
ative of the task that was mine and consulate of the fact that a 

rJaner is in harmony with the people who control the destinies of 
fhe co lege Particularly am I grateful for the happy situation 
that has Existed between the paper and its faculty director 

I have had excellent cooperation from students and student 

• fTLa TVVpv have eiven me all the news I have asked 

fo^andfha'e tried' M to aTwTs possible, to give them the space 

^fittfi^^ which has worked 

nnder me I can truthfully say that there has never been even a 
Kft mfsun^standing during my period as ^LSt^V" 



AND SO WE TOTTER OUT 



INDEX DEDICATION 

Continued from Page 1 

Gamma Mu, and Alpha Sigma Phi 

fraternities. 

Last year's Index was dedicated to 
Professor Fred C. Sears, head of the 
Pomology department. The dedication 
was written by Sir Wilfred Grenfell, 
noted explorer. 



Alumni Notes 

Marston Burnett S'21 has ju>! M 
ceived his ski instructor's certificaw 
at Otto Schneik Ski School at Han 
over, N. H. He was one of six stud- 
ents who qualified for this distinction 
out of a class of 46. Burnett is ureen-| 
keeper in charge of Wyantenu 
Club, and a member of the Tai-onic 
Ski Club, at Great Barrington. He I 
has been a ski instructor at the North- 
field Inn, and coaches the ski squad' 
at Northfield Seminary am! Mi 
Hermon School. 

By qualifying as a skilled ski in- 1 
structor, Burnett becomes one of the 
first greenkeepers in New England, if | 
not in this country, to combine a 
skilled knowledge of both sport activi- 
ties, thus demonstrating an increasing 
field of usefulness for golf clubs where 
winter sports can be developed to 
complete a full year program. 

This is the ideal set-up which many 
up-to-date clubs in New England are] 
striving for and is a key-point in golf 
club management as presented in the I 
Greenkeepers Short Course at M» 
State College under the direction 
Prof. Lawrence S. Dickinson. 

Philip Smith S'36 has taken I p»| 
tion with the Riseley Plant Hott 
at Hamilton, N. Y. 






Get Your Date for the Carnival Ball 

Drill Hall February 12 9 to 2 



Music by Biagini 



The famous "Crystal Shower" 



Chaperoning by the Major and the Doctor 

Tickets $ 4.00 per couple 

From Glick, Sievers, Blake, Packard, Steff, and Ruth Wood '38 



Soenstrom, and Morning- 
star Score 22 Points for 
Wesleyan. Bush, Ban- 
ana 4 Riel Score for State 



STATESMEN OUT-PLAYED 
42-24 IN AMHERST TILT 






heat waves in both Clinton, 
nd Amherst flooding out games 
amilton on Saturday and New 
,l ,ire on Monday, the State 

team was forced to go through 
, ,, r , ,i less week absorbing a 4-2 de- 
j,. at m Northeastern University at 
<ton Arena, Thursday, in the 
on( . * hrduled game played. 

Shi ving the advantage of having 
practiced regularly on good ice, the 
Hogkiea capitalized on their better 
uan i work, outskating and outshoot- 
InjjiL Maroon. The victor's captain, 
Johnny Bialek, once again lived up to 
hi* n putation, scoring two of the 
Sort Ik astern goals and gaining an 
! lss jst <>n a third. N.U. outplayed 
State only in the second period when 
a flurry of Husky shots kept Captain 
Al Ingalls busy in the loser's net with 
two fitting by to increase the North- 
nstern lead at the third period to 3-1. 
George Niden put State in the lead 
in 1:32 minutes of the first period on 
an unassisted goal but the fast skating 
Bialek evened the count with a marker 
at 9:i. r ). Bialek's two goals in the 
second period put N.U. in front 3-1. 
The last period found Northeastern 
■coring its last goal when Sessler 
pushed in an unassisted marker at 
5:24. Fighting to even the game, 
Coacfa Ball removed Ingalls from the 
State net and sent six men down the 
in but only Towle's goal on a pass 
from Bullock in 11:20 managed to 
mar the save-studded performance of 
(Carol Krystysen in the Husky net. 
The line-up: 
yi 4 M.S.C. (2) 

Fktdiiu h* ,w « Niden 

Gsmrj - C Mildram 

hales, rw n». Lavralcas 

Byrne, id Id. Towle 

faafc, rc | rd. Rossiter 

K en. | 8. Ingalls 



TANKMEN IN 
62-15 WIN 



State mermen scored their second 
successive win of the season in out- 
splashing Worcester Tech at Worcester 
62-15, last Saturday afternoon. The 
feature of the meet was Co-Captain 
Chick Cutter's performance in the 
440-yd. freestyle event in which he 
set a new Worcester pool record of 
5:18.4 minutes. 

State won all events but two. The 
300-yd. medley relay team of Irving, 
Hodder, and Howes scored the first 
State win. Cutter won the 220-yd. 
freestyle, with Thorndike second. 
Fisher, who was paced by Calo, won 
the 40-yd. dash event. Rounds and 
Irving finished in one two order in the 
150-yd. backstroke. Howes led the 
field in the 100-yd. freestyle with 
Rozwenc second. The 400-yd. relay 
team of Rozwenc, Fisher, Thorndike, 
and Jacobson scored the last State win. 
Dearborn of Worcester won the 
diving event with Page and Green 
finishing second and third. Engineer 
Evans headed Co-Captain Hodder to 
the tape in the 200-yd. breastroke 
event, while Bieniek finished third. 

This is the last meet for State before 
the final examination period. On 
February 12 State will swim against 
Coast Guard Academy at the local 
pool. 



State went down fighting before an 
undefeated Wesleyan team in the cage 
last night to the score of 53 to 36. 
The lead changed hands five times in 
the first half; but in the second half 
Morningstar and Soenstrom scored 
eight points each in a powerful Wes- 
leyan scoring drive. 

During the first half Wesleyan im- 
mediately jumped into the lead on 
three foul shots. Bufh made State's 
first score on a long shot from the 
floor to make the score 3 to 2. Nelson, 
Wesleyan's lanky center, came thru 
with two successive goals to raise 
their lead to 7-2. State, however, 
came back on two baskets by Riel and 
one each by Czelusniak, Bush and 
Barr to gain a lead which they held 
until there was only three minutes left 
to the half. At that time Wesleyan 
jumped into the lead, 18-16, and con- 
solidated their position with three foul 
shots and a basket. State put on a 
sustained rally in the closing minutes 
of the half but the only score was a 
basket by Czelusniak. The half closed 
with State trailing, 20-18. 

In the second half Wesleyan im- 
mediately unleashed a high powered 
scoring machine and ran the score up 
to 47 to 25 before State got going 
again. Barr scored three baskets and 
Riel and Bush scored one each but 
the Wesmen were too far ahead to be 
overtaken. 



B. U. QUINTET 
HERE SATURDAY 



ITC'KKTKKH PRACTICE 



The Mass. State varsity hockey 
t.ani journeyed to Springfield yes- 
terday to play the newly formed 
Springfield College hockey team. 
The Maroon goal grabbers re- 
turned with a 14-5 victory. 



COMMUNITY BASKETBALL 
LEAGUE 

A Community Basketball League 
has been organized, which will include 
four or five teams, with ten men on 
each squad. Three teams are now 
organized, and the first game was 
played yesterday afternoon. 

Anyone interested in joining the 
league should see Sam Golub. 

The purpose of the league is to help 
get commuters organized and to 
stimulate their interest in extra- 
curricular activities. 



FACULTY BOWLING LEAGUE 

The league finished its second round of compe- 
tition this past week with the following results 



*hysi-ed Bldg. a Busy Spot 
As Division Grows Rapidly 





P 


W 


L 


Pts. 


Chemistry 


■ 


8 





10 


Dairy 


4 


4 





5 


Bacteriology- 


H 


7 


1 


y 


Social Science 


H 


fi 


3 


1 


Physical Education 


I 


1 


1 





South College 


I 


4 


4 


:> 


Kernald Hall 


8 


a 


5 


4 


Administration 


H 


3 


| 


4 


Ag. Econ. 


K 


1 


t 


2 


Dining Hall 


1 


2 


6 


2 


Mathematics 


8 





8 





Horticulture 


8 





8 





HIGH 


SCORES 






High String 






Congdon 


114 


High Eve. 






Congdon 


:m*:i 


High Team Single String 






:ii>7 


High Team Eve. 








1401 



The varsity basketball team will 
meet the Terriers of Boston Univer- 
sity for the first time this Saturday 
night at the Cage. 

The Terriers will present a high 
powered scoring machine, but Coach 
Waylie Vaughan has found himself 
confronted with the problem of a 
weak defatise throughout the early 
games of the season. This was the 
cause of their recent loss to the 
Engineers from W.P.I. 

leading their lineup will be Solly 
Rechtem who is one of the leading 
individual scorers in New England 
collegiate basketball. Against Har- 
vard he scored 15 points, to lead all 
New England scorers. He will be 
ably accompanied by Russ I^awry at 
the other forward position. Captain 
Abe Rabinovitz has proved to be a 
dangerous scoring threat, coming from 
his defensive guard position to score 
under-the-basket assists. 

The Statesmen will undoubtedly 
present the same lineup which de- 
feated Middlebury and M.I.T. and 
lost to Connecticut. Captain Lefty 
Barr, who has yet to regain his 
scoring stride of last year, will be at 
right forward, matched by Eddie 
Czelusniak, who has been having a 
fine season, at left forward. At center 
will be Fred Riel who has been playing 
a fine floor and scoring game. At the 
guard positions there will be the much 
improved John Bush and Fred Sievers. 
Zelaso and Putnam will also see 
service at the guard posts. 



The powerful Amherst quintet down- 
ed the highly rated Frignrdmen in the 
cage last Saturday night by a 42-24 
score. The game started out to 1m- one 
of the beat games ever seen in this 
section but soon dwindled down to a 
bad passing, poor shooting affair with 
Amherst's Myers taking advantage of 
the State relapse to score 11 points 
for the Sabrinas. 

State started the scoring early when 
Sievers looped in a difficult one while 
running under the basket. Amherst 
soon tied it up and went ahead on 
baskets in quick succession by Sch- 
weizer and Ramey. Sievers added a 
point for State on a free try. Meyers 
then garnered the first of his seven 
field goals. Not to lie outdone, John 
Bush ran wild for a few minutes to 
score three baskets to put State in the 
lead, 9-6. Schweizer and Cocy added 
two baskets to the Amherst score to 
tie up the game, but Riel and Czelus- 
niak put State out in front again with 
a pair of baskets from outside the foul 
line. Then Amherst went to work, 
scoring 14 points to two for State in 
the remaining minutes of the first 
half. Score at the half. 23-15. 

Myers continued his good work as 
the second half got under way. Bush 
added two for State, but Coey and 
Myers added ten between them to 
increase the Amherst lead to 115-17. 



Amherst 

■ 



RaMkelbnll 

Jan. 23, Boston U. at M.S.C., 8:00 

Feb. 10, R. I. State at Kingston 
Track 

Jan. 30, K. of C. Meet at Boston 
Hockey 

Jan. 23, Middlebury at Middlebury 



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If recent trends are any indication, 
Istudenis at Mass. State seem to be 
|gettinu closer to the old Greek ideal of 
"a mind mind in a sound body." In 
Ifive yean there has been a jump in 
[the numlier of students accommodated 
I by li. physical education division 
[from DQ to 1200. 

Whil this increase is in part due 
u> | 'responding increase in enroll- 
lill there has been a dispro- 
portioi ily growing interest in physi- 
cal i, 1 1 ion coupled with a more 
il program. Mu